Research Grants/Fellowships/SBIR

Final Report: Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments (CHSUE)

EPA Grant Number: R829482
Center: HSRC (2001) - Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments
Center Director: Bouwer, Edward J.
Title: Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments (CHSUE)
Investigators: Bouwer, Edward J. , Alavi, Hedy
Institution: The Johns Hopkins University
EPA Project Officer: Lasat, Mitch
Project Period: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2007
Project Amount: $941,000
RFA: Hazardous Substance Research Centers - HSRC (2001) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Hazardous Waste/Remediation , Land and Waste Management

Objective:

The Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments (CHSUE) completed its final year of existence under EPA’s Hazardous Substances Research Centers program with Collateral Grant funding (expiration date of August 31, 2007). The CHSUE was a cooperative activity between The Johns Hopkins University (lead institution), University of Maryland, Morgan State University, University of Connecticut, and New Jersey Institute of Technology and covered EPA Regions 1, 2, and 3.
 
About 80 percent of the U.S. population lives in metropolitan areas. These urban residents face a number of pressing environmental problems including exposure to toxic chemicals from contaminated sites, landfills, incinerators, abandoned industrial sites (Brownfields), industrial releases, lead, and pesticide use. In this context, EPA Regions 1, 2, and 3 have identified “Urban Livability” as a strategic priority. Focusing on the upper mid-Atlantic to the Northeast, the mission of the CHSUE was two-fold: (1) to promote a better understanding of physical, chemical, and biological processes for detecting, assessing, and managing risks associated with the use and disposal of hazardous substances in urban environments and (2) to disseminate the results of the research and provide technical expertise to various stakeholders including community groups, municipal officials, regulators, academia, and industry. The Collateral Grant funded a portion of our Outreach Program as described below.
 
OUTREACH PROGRAM
 
The Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments (CHSUE) Outreach Program under the Collateral Grant was a collaborative effort between The Johns Hopkins University (lead institution), University of Connecticut (representing EPA Region 1), New Jersey Institute of Technology (representing EPA Region 2), and University of Maryland and Morgan State University (representing EPA Region 3). The goal of the Outreach Program was to transfer knowledge and technology resulting from the research projects and expertise of the principal investigators and technical staff to communities with environmental contamination throughout the regions.
 
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO BROWNFIELDS COMMUNITIES (TAB)
 
TAB Goal: To assist municipal officials, developers, and community groups with the challenges facing sustainable Brownfields redevelopment through education, technical assistance and the application of advanced science and technology.
 
TECHNICAL OUTREACH SERVICES TO COMMUNITIES
 
TOSC Goal: To provide technical assistance and education to communities affected by hazardous waste to assist them in their participation in the restoration of their environment and neighborhoods.

 

Summary/Accomplishments (Outputs/Outcomes):

The outreach activities conducted by the CHSUE were distributed among the partnering institutions to more appropriately respond to the local needs across the large geographical area represented by EPA Regions 1, 2, and 3. The interdisciplinary and multimedia nature of hazardous waste site problems demanded a diverse array of scientific talent and facilities. The affiliations and expertise of the participants in the Outreach Program are detailed below:
 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (Lead Institution) (EPA Region 3)
Director: Edward Bouwer (environmental engineering, bioremediation, and engineering microbiology)
Assoc. Director: Hedy Alavi (environmental engineering, hazardous waste and solid waste management)
Ralph Lightner (environmental restoration and waste management)
Erik Rifkin (human health and ecological risk assessment, risk communication)
 
University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland (EPA Region 3)
Barbara Sattler (environmental health nursing)
Robyn Gilden (environmental health nursing)
Rebecca Clouse (environmental health nursing)
Mary Rosso (regulatory and community perspectives)
Johanna Neumann (community involvement)
Katie Huffling (environmental health nursing)
Errol Mazursky (EPA Fellow—public health)
 
Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland (EPA Region 3)
Gbekeloluwa Oguntimein (chemical engineering, hazardous waste management, bioremediation)
Guangming Chen (risk assessment, experimental design and statistics)
Sedley Williams (soil chemistry, water quality analysis, environ. assessment, GIS)
Bheem Kattel (industrial engineer, occupational ergonomics and safety)
 
New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (EPA Region 2)
Director: Fred Ellerbush (environmental engineering, hazardous and solid waste management, risk assessment, and outreach) (Fred left NJIT at the end of October 2005—his duties were assumed by Daniel Watts)
Director: James Mack (environmental management, site, characterization and remediation)
Executive Director: Daniel Watts (environmental management and chemistry, green manufacturing, and sustainability)
Gerard McKenna (community outreach, characterization methods, technology transfer and training)
 
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (EPA Region 1)
Christopher Perkins (environmental monitoring and assessment, environmental toxicology and risk, risk communication)
Kevin Hood (public health, facilitation, community outreach)
Amine Dahmani (remediation, site assessment, Brownfields policy)
Charles Zimenski (hydrocarbon remediation, environmental engineering)
 
The funds from the Collateral Grant were used to support the Technical Assistance to Brownfields Communities (TAB) program. The objective of the TAB program was to assist municipal officials, developers, and community groups with meeting the challenges of sustainable Brownfields redevelopment by providing education and technical assistance on the application of advanced science and technology. A separate Final Report was prepared for the TOSC projects under the Core Grant. However, the TOSC and TAB efforts were frequently highly interrelated, so it is difficult to separate them into two Final Reports. Consequently, there will be some overlap in the discussion of the Outreach Projects contained in the two Final Reports.
 
The outreach activities for the CHSUE included 68 projects geographically distributed across EPA Regions 1, 2, and 3 (Table 1). Twenty projects were allocated under TOSC, and 48 projects were allocated under TAB as shown in Table 1. A listing of the communities for the TOSC and TAB projects appear in Table 2. The listing in Table 2 is organized by EPA Region. Information on each of the TAB projects appears in Appendix A. Miscellaneous activities in the support of the outreach efforts in these regions are presented in Appendix B.
 
 
 
 

 

 

FINAL SUMMARY

 
Table 2. Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments
Summary of Outreach Projects with Detail
 

EPA Region

Project Title/ Community/Location
TAB/TOSC
 

         I

 
 
Aberjona River /Industri-Plex Superfund Site
Woburn, MA
 
TOSC
 
I
Elizabeth Mine
Stafford, VT
 
TOSC
 

         I

Fall River, MA/Tiverton, RI –ENACT Fall River MA, Tiverton,RI
 
TOSC
 

I

 
Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR)
TOSC
         I
Cape Cod (several towns), MA
 
I
Newhall Coalition
Hamden, CT
 
TOSC
I
Passamaquoddy Tribe at Pleasant Point
Perry, ME
 
TOSC
I
Unnamed Fish and Game Club/ Lead Remediation
CT
 
TOSC
I
Williamstown, VT Williamstown, VT
 
TOSC
I
Aroostook Band of Mic Macs
Presque Isle, ME
TAB
I
Blackburn and Union Privileges Superfund Site
Walpole, MA
TAB
I
Bridgeport, East End Neighborhood
Bridgeport, CT
TAB
I
Coltsville Redevelopment Project
Hartford, CT
TAB
I
Mallory Hat Factory
Danbury, CT
TAB
I
City of Meriden Redevelopment
Meriden, CT
TAB
I
Ninigret Park
Charlestown, RI
TAB
I
Regional Growth Partnership
New Haven, CT
TAB
I
Rocky Hill, CT
TAB
I
Roosevelt Mills
Vernon, CT
TAB
I
Town of Plainfield
Plainfield, CT
TAB
II
Abbott School District
Statewide, NJ
TAB
II
Brownfield Environmental Solutions for Trenton
Trenton, NJ
TAB
II
Bloomfield Third Riverbank Association
Bloomfield, NJ
TOSC
II
Buzby Landfill
Vorhees, NJ
TOSC
II
Camden, Fettersville Community Organization/Macedonia Historical Association
Camden, NJ
TOSC
II
Ft. Edwards
Ft Edward, NJ
TOSC
II
Heart of Camden
Camden, NJ
TAB
II
Ironbound Community Corp
Newark, NJ
TOSC
II
Long Branch Concerned Coalition
Long Branch,NJ
TOSC
II
Martin-Aaron Community
Camden, NJ
TOSC
II
Ringwood Neighborhood Association
Ringwood, NJ
TOSC
II
Lakewood Redevelopment Authority
Lakewood, NJ
TAB
II
Ford Avenue Redevelopment Project
Milltown, NJ
TAB
II
New York State Department of Housing and Community Renewal
Statewide, NY
TOSC
II
Coalition for Clean Air during Construction at Liberty Harbor North
Jersey City, NJ
TOSC
II
Upper Hudson River – Brownfield
Ft Howard & Saratoga Springs, NY
TOSC
II
Middleport Remedial Action Group
Middleport, NY
TOSC
III
Lamond – Riggs Park
Washington, DC
TOSC
III
Hamilton Park
New Castle, DE
TOSC
III
Metachem
Delaware City, DE
TOSC
III
Hercules Golf/DE National Golf Course
New Castle, DE
TAB
III
U-HELP
Wilmington, DE
TAB
III
Greater Wilmington Environmental Health Summit
Wilmington, DE
TAB
III
Woodberry Land Trust
Baltimore, MD
TOSC
III
Clearinghouse for a Healthy Community/Baltimore Community for
Environmental Justice
Middle East Baltimore, MD
TAB
       III
Highway Petroleum Abandoned Gas Station
Cumberland, MD
 
III
Former Baltimore Transformer and Coil Brownfield
Elkridge, MD
TAB
III
East St./Carroll Creek Brownfield Sites/Parcel “G” Brownfield Sites
Frederick, MD
TAB
III
Central Chemical Superfund Site
Hagerstown, MD
TAB
III
Superfund and Brownfield Sites in Herring Run Watershed
Baltimore, MD
TOSC
III
Little Washington
Upper Marlboro, MD
TOSC/TAB
III
Brown Derby Abandoned Gas Station
Princess Anne, MD
TAB
III
Lester’s Garage Abandoned Gas Station
Salisbury, MD
TAB
III
Brooklyn/Curtis Bay-Pottee-Garrett St. Site
Baltimore, MD
TAB
III
Multiple Brownfields-Park Heights
Baltimore, MD
TAB
III
Baltimore Environmental Justice Network
Baltimore, MD
TAB
III
Box Hill South
Abingdon, MD
TOSC/TAB
III
Little Elk Creek One Cleanup Pilot
Elkton, MD
TAB
III
Baltimore City Soil
Baltimore, MD
TOSC
III
Carroll County MTBE
Carroll County, MD
TAB
III
Eastalco
Frederick, MD
TAB
III
Jacksonville Exxon
Baltimore County, MD
TAB
III
Washington Village/Pigtown
Baltimore, MD
TAB
III
Rail Road Roundhouse
Newburg, MO
TAB
III
West Philadelphia PCE Brownfield Site
Philadelphia, PA
TAB
III
Pen Argyl
Pen Argyl, PA
TAB
III
Chester
Chester, PA
TAB
III
Pottstown
Pottstown, PA
TAB
III
Northern Liberties
Philadelphia, PA
TAB
III
Ambler Asbestos Piles/Bo-Rit
Ambler, PA
TAB
III
Pathan Chemical Site
Philadelphia, PA
TAB
III
Swimming Point Civic League
Portsmouth, VA
TAB
III
Swimming Point Civic League (2)
Portsmouth, VA
TAB
III
Brook-Hancock-Jefferson Metropolitan Planning Commission
Weirton, WV
TAB
III
Park Heights Reisterstown Corridor Community (PRCC)
Baltimore, MD
TAB
       
 
 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR THE TAB PROGRAM
 
The CHSUE activities under the Collateral Grant benefited from guidance supplied by an external advisory committee. The Outreach Advisory Committee (OAC) provided guidance on our TOSC and TAB programs.
 
Our Outreach Advisory Committee (OAC) was comprised of 12 representatives from EPA, other government offices, industry, and the community (Table 3). The purpose for the OAC was to assist the CHSUE in the development, implementation, and evaluation of education, knowledge transfer, and outreach activities and to identify outreach funding opportunities. The OAC met annually throughout the duration of the Collateral Grant funding.
 
 
 
CENTER INTERNET WEBSITE: www.jhu.edu/hsrc/
 
 

Appendix A:  Outreach Projects Under the Collateral Grant

Project/Community Name: Aroostook Band of Micmacs

City: Presque Isle

State: ME

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Russell Dennis

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Jim Murphy

Institution/Center: ERI/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The tribe took ownership of a portion of the former Loring AFB in Caribou, ME. The parcel of land was contaminated by a variety of chemicals including, petroleum and other fuel byproducts. This parcel included four, million gallon fuel tanks which are still in place, in varying degrees of structural soundness. The tribe hoped to use to the existing infrastructure to launch a fuel oil business. Additionally, they wished to use other parts of the parcel for cultural purposes, including tree farming to produce materials for basket production and medicinal purposes.

Activities:

The site in 2006 and met with the tribe and investigated and facilitated contacts for structural and safety inspections and repairs. TAB facilitated contact with parties regarding rail track upgrades as well as funding opportunities. Additionally, TAB provided some support on the interpretation of laboratory data associated with the contamination and Brownfields assessment. The activity on this project was due to increase as the property was transferred to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and then subsequently to the Tribe. Unfortunately, the TAB program, and our ability to support the tribe, ended prior to the BIA transferred the parcel to the Tribe.

Project/Community Name: Blackburn and Union Privileges Superfund Site

City: Walpole

State: MA

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Robin Chapelle

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: N/A

Institution/Center: CESE/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Blackburn and Union Privileges Superfund Site is located in Walpole, MA and is listed by the USEPA as a National Priorities List site. It contains over 21 parcels of land over an area of approximately 22 acres, with 12 parcels within the Superfund Site boundary. The primary contaminants of concern are Asbestos, volatile organics, metals and PAHs. The Town of Walpole was looking to redevelop this parcel consistent with their Master Plan developed in 2004. The City’s primary concerns related to redeveloping this parcel in a manner that minimized exposure and risk. To that end, TAB became involved to assist the Town.

Activities:

TAB attended 5 meetings, over the extent of the project, and met privately with citizens groups to fully understand their concerns and issues. TAB received and reviewed several documents including the Remedial Investigative Report and the Reuse and Redevelopment Planning Alternatives. Based on our review, TAB provided comments related to mitigating risk associated with human health and ecological receptors, to the city of Walpole on their proposed reuse plan.

Project/Community Name: Bridgeport, East End Neighborhood

City: Bridgeport

State: CT

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Sabine Kusco

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Kathleen Castagna

Institution/Center: ERI/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

TAB assisted the City of Bridgeport with the redevelopment planning for its East End neighborhood, which included a historically contentious “Mount Trashmore” site. There was also some assistance being provided to the City regarding the development of a lead abatement program.

Activities:

TAB has attended 8 monthly meetings and planning sessions during this project period. TAB has evaluated the feasibility of the use of phytoremediation on one of the parcels that had concentrations of arsenic and chromium that exceeded the CT Remediation Standard Regulations. Unfortunately phytoremediation was not found to be suitable for this site due to plant toxicity issues. In 2006, TAB personnel attended a public health fair in Bridgeport and provided expertise and technical support regarding lead paint in homes. TAB participated in a weekend long community design charrette to produce a general plan. After the consensus design, TAB evaluated the ability of using an integrated constructed wetland to treat storm water prior to its arrival at the receptor, Johnson’s Creek. There are many advantages to this, from an aesthetics and environmental standpoint; although there are issues with the contamination on site. We worked with the City to find potential funding for this project, unfortunately the TAB program, and our ability to support the City ended prior to obtaining funding.

Project/Community Name: Coltsville Redevelopment Project

City: Hartford

State: CT

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Carol Coburn - CSS/CON

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Jim Murphy

Institution/Center: ERI/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities  Conducted:

Project Description:

A Community group- CSS/Con and the City of Hartford asked TAB to review asbestos and lead remediation plans that were proposed as part of the revitalization project The group was concerned that lead and asbestos would be released into the neighborhood and to tenants still occupying part of the complex.

Activities:

The lead and asbestos plans were reviewed and found to be appropriate. TAB met with the developer and performed a site inspection tour. The project continued with three follow up meetings and was completed in September of 2004.

Project/Community Name: Mallory Hat Factory

City: Danbury

State: CT

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Jack Kozuchowski

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Jim Murphy

Institution/Center: ERI/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Danbury historically was the center of the New England hat making industry over the last 150 years. It is known that mercury was extensively used in the production of felt for hats and mercury was released to the Still River and groundwater in the area, and still present in sediments. Last summer, a professor from a University in Connecticut released information to the press regarding an independent study that he conducted on mercury contamination in Danbury. This has raised concerns in the community and forced the City of Danbury Health Department to respond to these concerns. This site is part of a Brownfields Assessment Pilot and the City is actively seeking redevelopment. The preliminary assessments completed (Phase I and II), if accurate, could minimize the ability to develop this property.

This professor also has announced his intentions to perform his own risk assessment study which resulted in additional concerns for the community.

Activities:

TAB reviewed contaminant data reports and the Brownfield Assessment Pilot Grant. The City proposed using a novel phytoremediation program to remediate the mercury at the site; however, there was some concern regarding the volatilization of mercury as a result of the process. To minimize concern, TAB recommended a baseline and periodic atmospheric mercury monitoring plan prior to the start of this remediation process to quantify the transpiration of mercury from the leaves. We worked with the City to design a pilot/ baseline monitoring program which helped alleviate some concerns regarding the potential for mercury to be emitted to the atmosphere during the transpiration process. TAB provided comments to the City of Danbury on their Quality Assurance Project Plan for the phytoremediation and subsequent atmospheric monitoring program. Additionally, we had 2 meetings and three conference calls regarding the QAPP and our proposed comments and changes. After the completion of the monitoring program, TAB had two conference calls regarding the data generated by the atmospheric monitoring program and our interpretation of the data. It was found that there was no risk to the community due to phytoremediation program. This program was completed in 2005.

Project/Community Name: City of Meriden

City: Meriden

State: CT

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Peggy Brenan

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Kathleen Castagna

Institution/Center: ERI/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

TAB was in the early stages of working with the City of Meriden staff to provide technical review services and some educational components to the City and several community organizations regarding potential redevelopment of two Brownfields properties in the city.

Activities:

TAB attended 15 meetings this project period and participated in planning for the reuse of City owned sites, including the Meriden Mall hub site. TAB facilitated communication between the City Wetlands Commission and the US Army Corps of Engineers regarding wetland restoration associated with one of the sites. TAB review reports and clean up cost estimates for the City of Meriden associated with the potential sites. Focus had been on the cleanup and reuse of a silver manufacturing factory that was very heavily contaminated with asbestos. Its proximity to homes and the revitalized business core of the downtown made it a priority as well as environmental and human health risk issue. As a result, one key focus of the support provided to the City was providing assistance in risk and risk management for the site as it relates to redevelopment options. The project is ongoing and the TAB program, and our ability to support the City, ended prior to completion of the redevelopment and risk management plans.

Project/Community Name: Ninigret Park

City: Charlestown

State: RI

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Virginia Wooten

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: N/A

Institution/Center: ERI/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The town of Charlestown, RI requested TAB to assist them in understanding the implementation of the remediation plan of a former Naval Air Station located adjacent to Long Island Sound that has been turned over to the town by the Federal government. There were multiple contaminants of concern, including benzene, lead, and free phase gasoline. We were working with the Ninigret Park Contamination Study Committee.

Activities:

We have attended over 20 meetings with the committee during this project period to facilitate the redevelopment process. TAB brought in some expertise from the Conway School of Landscape Architecture to help the town and community undertake the visioning process for their park. We provided maps and schematics, including site photographs to the school. Initial site tours were completed with the intention of working this process and resulting design into the school’s winter practicum. This process resulted in a landscape blueprint that the stakeholders then used to improve the quality of the park and minimize the potential exposure to contamination. We attended 7 meetings with the committee to facilitate the follow up contaminant delineation activities to the initial investigation activities. TAB met on site, in all day meetings with the RI DEP and RI National Guard relating to the investigation and remedy (if needed) of the last two locations suspected of contamination. These meetings went very well and the town and citizens committee are satisfied with the testing being done, planned, and likely remedial actions proposed. As a result of TAB involvement, the Army Corps of Engineers have agreed to remove buried transformers that likely contain PCBs. Additionally, per a TAB recommendation, a comprehensive public survey which focused on site uses has been completed and town council is processing the results of the survey. TAB provided technical recommendations regarding elevated nitrogen levels in the pond. The excess nitrogen was likely originating from nearby soccer fields and the resulting drainage of fertilizers into the pond. Preferential subsurface flow was caused by abandoned pipes which were observed on historic maps. TAB recommended a series of pollution abatement measures which include the plugging of the pipes and reduced fertilizer applications. To help mitigate the explosive growth of milfoil, TAB researched measures, including a triploid (sterile) species of grass carp, which could be introduced to eat the milfoil. This method was being used in 23 other states to control for invasive species. This recommendation is still being considered by the town and the R.I. DEP. TAB was asked to review plans for a high density “high-tech” septic system 17 subsurface flow was caused by abandoned pipes which were observed on historic maps. TAB recommended a series of pollution abatement measures which include the plugging of the pipes and reduced fertilizer applications. To help mitigate the explosive growth of milfoil, TAB researched measures, including a triploid (sterile) species of grass carp, which could be introduced to eat the milfoil. This method was being used in 23 other states to control for invasive species. This recommendation is still being considered by the town and the R.I. DEP. TAB was asked to review plans for a high density “high-tech” septic system for a proposed condominium complex that abuts the site. This complex was not on town water or sewer and the density and volume of effluent would exceed current regulations. Variances were applied for by the developer. TAB recommend against the system based on a literature review and an assessment of past experiences with this system in Oregon. The system is design, installation, and most of all maintenance sensitive. TAB recommended that if installed, a bond be required to protect, the town from system failure in the future.

Project/Community Name: Regional Growth Partnership

City: New Haven

State: CT

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: New Haven Regional Growth Partnership

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Jim Murphy

Institution/Center: ERI/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Regional Growth Partnership (RGP) is a Brownfields Pilot recipient and also lead agency for a smart growth project that involves the Quinnipiac River Conservation and Development Corridor.

Activities:

A workshop was presented on Brownfields legislation and its impact on the liability framework and tools for managing liability. A follow-up to this workshop was also conducted to help the Board gain a better understanding of the decision-making process for acquisition of contaminated properties. This session and TAB research involvement assisted the Board in creating a model process to be used in its deliberations along the Corridor.

Project/Community: Name Rocky Hill

City: Rocky Hill

State: CT

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Jeanne Webb Chavez/ Glenn Parent

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Jim Murphy

University: UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

TAB was involved with two projects in Rocky Hill. The first project was the assessment of a former police firing range in order to determine clean up requirements before marketing the site as a light industrial business location. Secondly, TAB was asked by the town to advise them on use and potential redevelopment processes associated with a closed 45 acre privately owned municipal landfill site. This site became the town’s responsibility resulting from a nonpayment of taxes.

Activities:

Project 1—After a review of historical documents, it was determined by TAB that the site had in fact been little used as a firing range. Preliminary review using a XRF analyzer determined that the soil was well under clean up levels. However three telephone pole “stubs” were found that had been used as target backstops, which would have to be disposed of as contaminated waste. The Boston Lead Company of Middletown was contacted by TAB and Rocky Hill for confirmation of this opinion. After a joint site inspection they concurred with this opinion. The “stubs” were removed and the site was being marketed.

Project 2—The town was going to use this landfill site to store stumps. TAB reviewed the documents associated with the landfill and strongly advised the town to seek alternatives, as heavy equipment traffic would damage the containment cap.

Project/Community Name: Roosevelt Mills

City: Vernon

State: CT

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Larry Schaffer

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Jim Murphy

University: UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Vernon, like innumerable New England towns has an abandoned textile mill that the town is trying to redevelop. Roosevelt Mills is a 100 year old concrete structure that is contaminated by dry cleaning solvent (TCE) and other contamination from the wool sweater production operations. TAB assisted the town with technical issues related to the redevelopment of the property, including community outreach.

Activities:

TAB assisted the town with a presentation to the Connecticut Development Corporation to help secure further funding. TAB staff reviewed the data report generated from site specific treatability studies and provided written comment to the Town. TAB staff has attended 8 meetings during this project period and worked extensively with the Town to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed remediation strategies. Additionally, TAB provided technical assistance on the interpretation of the data resulting from the remediation activities, to the Town. TAB closed out this program in September 2006.

Project/Community Name: Town of Plainfield , CT

City: Plainfield

State: CT

EPA Region: Region 1

Community Contact: Elizabeth Swenson

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: Kathleen Castagna

Institution/Center: CESE/ UConn

Outreach Director/Manager: Christopher Perkins

Project Manager/Coordinator: Kevin Hood

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

TAB was asked to advise the town of Plainfield regarding the redevelopment of a Mill site destroyed by fire. RFPs have been prepared and TAB assisted the town in the review of the responses.

Activities:

TAB attended 4 meetings and one contractor inspection tour regarding of a former mill site and (and other sites) in Plainfield. TAB facilitated the release of liens on the property which has enabled the town to begin marketing several sites for redevelopment TAB reviewed proposals received in response to a advertised RPP and provided recommendations to the Town.

Project/Community Name: Abbott School Districts

City: Statewide

State: NJ

EPA Region: Region 2

Community Contact: N/A

State Contact: Paul Hamilton, School Construction Corporation, NJEDA

EPA Contact: N/A

University: New Jersey Institute of Technology

Outreach Director/Manager: Fred Ellerbusch & Jim Mack

Project Manager/Coordinator: Fred Ellerbusch & Jim Mack

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled in Abbott v. Burke that children in urban communities are entitled to a "thorough and efficient" education under the State Constitution. The ruling includes educational standards and quality teaching, health services, extracurricular programs and safe and adequate school buildings. This last item has been translated into a multi-billion dollar upgrade program for school districts that have been identified as needing help to correct deficiencies. The majority of these districts are urban and because of scarce land availability, new school sites involve Brownfields.

Activities:

NJIT has provided support through extensive interaction with the NJ School Construction Corporation (NJSCC), NJDEP, and consultants to refine the use of Triad particularly as it applies to school construction in urban areas. For example, we followed up the completed Triad Approach site assessment of two new projects: New Brunswick, and Hoboken with site investigation support. We sponsored an NJDEP-NJSCC site visit to provide an opportunity for senior officials to see a field investigation using the Triad Approach in action. NJIT finalized a multi-year agreement to provide technical support on the use of the Triad Approach for site acquisition activities - particularly with site characterization. This activity was transitioned from TASB support to direct funding from the School Construction Corporation and has evolved into a long term activity.

Project/Community Name: Brownfields Environmental Solutions for Trenton

City: Trenton

State: NJ

EPA Region: Region 2

Community Contact: Leah Yasenchak & JR Capasso

State Contact: N/A

EPA Contact: N/A

University: New Jersey Institute of Technology

Outreach Director/Manager: Fred Ellerbusch and Jim Mack

Project Manager/Coordinator: Fred Ellerbusch and Jim Mack

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Brownfields Environmental Solutions for Trenton Advisory Council (BEST) was formalized through a USEPA Pilot grant but originated in the community support work under a previous TOSC project. BEST is focused on the Brownfields opportunities in the city of Trenton, New Jersey ranging from assisted living housing, residential living, to commercial redevelopment. The council also serves as a standing forum for citizen involvement.

Activities:

Monthly meetings were held during the quarter with presentations from the city, NJDEP, new developer initiatives, the TAB program and NJIT support resources, as well as citywide redevelopment initiatives. We drafted a panel proposal for the 2004 Brownfields Conference focused on how Brownfields fits into the overall planning effort for city. An informative citywide bus tour of major Brownfields properties and redevelopment plans was conducted by the City of Trenton for the BEST. Immediately following the tour a meeting was held to develop concepts and ideas that might aid the city as it moves forward. Subsequent meetings have included opportunities to address property issues in-depth that were identified during the tour and refine the concepts and ideas that BEST developed. Monthly meetings were held during the year that focused on how the group could assist the City of Trenton with redevelopment of its Brownfield sites. The BEST also toured Brownfields in the City to assess progress and continue discussions on redevelopment objectives. Meetings focused on the Magic Marker cleanup, newly identified Brownfields properties and initiatives, funding opportunities, integrating redevelopment plans with State-sponsored community schools, storm water investigations, and development of topics for the Brownfield 2005 conference. BEST also reviewed and provided input on updated HUD community development documents which will be the subject of a presentation to the Mayor in the next quarter NJIT provided BEST with a presentation on the issues of use of re-cycled concrete aggregate in construction, which is becoming of greater concern in New Jersey and other states.

Project/Community Name: Heart of Camden

City: Camden

State: New Jersey

EPA Region: Region 2

Community Contact: Chris Auth and Father Doyle

State Contact: Judy Shaw

EPA Contact: Larry D'Andrea, USEPA

University: New Jersey Institute of Technology

Outreach Director/Manager: Fred Ellerbusch and Jerry McKenna

Project Manager/Coordinator: Fred Ellerbusch and Jerry McKenna

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

NHSRC was requested to provide technical assistance to a South Waterfront Redevelopment Plan sponsored by the Heart of Camden, a community organization located in South Camden. The area has been plagued by encroachment of industrial uses and abandoned property including sites listed on the NJDEP Known Contaminated Site List, USEPA Superfund program and the target of NJDEP enforcement actions. The area is disadvantaged but with strong grassroots community involvement. Our assistance activities were focused on a technical evaluation of the Environmental Risk Management Framework & Mitigation Strategies Interim Report prepared by Vita Nuova LLC under funding by the Heart of Camden. We provide technical suggestions on land use issues and building design for Brownfields.

Activities:

During the period of this project, our involvement with the community leadership, City of Camden, NJDEP, and others continued to be extensive on the redevelopment plans for the Waterfront South area through conference calls and meetings. We commented on an update of the NJDEP Air Toxics study to assess land use impacts on the residential neighborhoods. A multi-stakeholder meeting was held with the NJDEP Commissioner to review neighborhood plans and address concerns. Vita Nuova, Tufts, and NJIT developed a proposal to conduct an independent transportation related study on diesel emissions to determine the impact of mobile sources on air quality.

Project/Community Name: Lakewood Redevelopment Authority

City: Lakewood

State: NJ

EPA Region: Region 2

Community Contact: Trish Compton

State Contact: Ken Kloo

EPA Contact: Larry D'Andrea, USEPA

Institution/Center: New Jersey Institute of Technology-NHSRC

Outreach Director/Manager: Fred Ellerbusch and Jerry McKenna

Project Manager/Coordinator: Jerry McKenna

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

At the request of the Lakewood Redevelopment Authority, NJIT has been asked to provide guidance on stakeholder involvement and community support. Lakewood is the recipient of a USEPA Brownfield Pilot grant and has begun the process of developing an inventory of sites. Work on stakeholder outreach has just started.

Activities:

After some initial support, few additional activities took place, or at least there were no requests for assistance. There is a strong likelihood that the project may not need further support to guide the stakeholder planning and outreach activities. A letter was sent to determine additional needs.

Project/Community Name: Ford Avenue Redevelopment Project

City: Milltown

State: NJ

EPA Region: Region 2

Community Contact: Denise Nickel, Middlesex County Improvement Authority

State Contact: Marie Franco-Spera, NJDEP - a transition is expected in the near future

EPA Contact: Carl Struble, USEPA

University: New Jersey Institute of Technology

Outreach Director/Manager: Fred Ellerbusch

Project Manager/Coordinator: Jim Mack

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

At the request of NJDEP, NHSRC provided technical support to facilitate the Systematic Planning and Work Plan preparation phases of the Triad Approach. The Ford Avenue Redevelopment Project is a former Michelin Tire manufacturing facility located on 20 areas of land in Milltown, NJ. The Ford Avenue Authority was created to provide a mechanism to redevelop this site into senior housing, market rate residential and mixed use commercial. The project involves coordination among key stakeholders including Middlesex County Improvement Authority (MCIA), the NJDEP, the developer, USEPA Region II Brownfields, USEPA Region II Mobile Laboratory, the MCIA consultant, Argonne Labs and USEPA Technology Innovation Office.

Activities:

Provided technical support for preparation of the Triad work plan and for the fieldwork and in preparing draft for NJDEP review. Participated in meetings w/NJDEP to review and discuss comments to WP. Organized a training session with Region 2 EPA ERT to present a data management system. Organized a training session for NJDEP on the Tetra Tech Data Management System and Decision Support Software for Triad programs. Updated key NJDEP officials on EPA data, BDA program and funding. Attended meetings w/ Milltown Ford Avenue Redevelopment Agency to provide technical support to discussion on Triad approach, schedule for investigation and funding requirements. Provided technical assistance to prepare HSDRF grant application.

Project/Community Name: Hercules Golf/DE National Golf Course

City: New Castle

State: DE

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Sheryl Ottinger, Bill Dunn

State Contact: Christina Wirtz (DNREC)

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The DE National Golf Course site comprises 162 acres, of which 101 acres was an operating 9-hole golf course. The remaining 61 acres is undeveloped land. A development company is interested in purchasing the property for residential use. The Milltown-Limestone Civic Alliance, an umbrella community group for New Castle County, asked for assistance reviewing the RI/FS submitted by the environmental consultants. Their questions and concerns included: was the site posing a threat to human health and the environment in its present state, was contamination migrating off-site, would the proposed remediation be conducted in a way to protect workers and nearby residents from further exposure, and would it be appropriate to consider residential reuse given the level of contamination on-site? They also voiced concern about increased traffic related to new housing.

Activities:

Outreach staff reviewed documents provided by the community and researched additional questions related to arsenic in pesticides with the assistance of Dr. Caroline Baier-Anderson, a PhD Toxicologist. Staff identified other case studies similar to the community’s situation where contaminated sites were reused as golf courses and the type of remediation involved. Staff provided comments to the community to inform their participation in County Planning Board meetings. Outreach staff responded to several additional questions from the community related to characterization of arsenic contamination on-site and most appropriate follow-up questions to pursue. Staff also identified the appropriate process for submitting comment to DNREC and reviewed the Interim Arsenic Cleanup Standard as requested by the community. The community group also requested Center support for new State Legislation on decreasing the residential arsenic cleanup level. Staff reminded the group that TAB cannot engage in political advocacy, but did discuss scientific considerations of risk levels pertinent to the issue and also referred the group to other organizations in DE they could collaborate with. The Center was asked to present a workshop on arsenic, contamination, movement in the environment, health effects, risk based concentrations and screening levels, risk assessment, and public health protection interventions. The workshop was organized by the community group and held on 5/21/05. Thirty-five community members attended, including State Senator David Sakola. Electronic and printed copies of the presentation were distributed at the workshop and afterwards to promote further dissemination of the information. Staff made follow-up calls and emails to assess additional learning and technical assistance needs. Following the workshop, outreach staff provided additional information on what assumptions are involved in determining risk-based concentrations. Staff also reviewed the statewide background arsenic studies and the Draft Arsenic Risk Management Proposal and provided comments to the community and DNREC. Outreach staff also investigated questions from the community related to autism rates and available literature for the DE, MD, PA, and NJ areas.

Project/Community Name: U-HELP

City: Wilmington

State: DE

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Brenda Gunter

State Contact: Christina Wirtz (DNREC)

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Urban Health and Environment Learning Project requested assistance with providing educational workshops for the community members in Wilmington.

Activities:

Outreach staff provided instruction on making a FOIA request to DNREC and suggested some specific questions to ask regarding site documents and cleanup standards. Staff met with UHELP representative and DNREC to discuss possible technical services for Wilmington and to identify learning needs for future trainings and workshops. UHELP identified other community leaders in Wilmington to bring into the discussion. Staff discussed learning needs with contacts from UHELP, which were identified as grant writing skills, community capacity building, and public participation process. Staff created draft agendas for each of the three workshops and shared those with UHELP for review and critique. (See Greater Wilmington Environmental Health Summit.)

Project/Community Name: Greater Wilmington Environmental Health Summit

City: Wilmington

State: DE

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Brenda Gunther (UHELP), Susan Regis Collins,

Alfie Moss

State Contact: Christina Wirtz (DNREC)

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden/Johanna Neumann

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

There are many environmental concerns and questions in the Wilmington Area. The workshop request originated from the Urban Health and Environment Learning Project and was then expanded to include a broader stakeholder group to form the steering committee.

Activities:

Staff met with key leaders to brainstorm ideas for the workshop, the steering committee membership, and plan for the workshop. Tasks were delegated and members were invited to participate on the steering committee. Staff followed-up on progress with the invitations and provided logistical support for communications. Staff organized and facilitated the first of four planning conference calls on 12/6/05 to discuss overall mission, agenda, and logistics for the day. Staff facilitated identification of additional stakeholders to involve in planning and to invite to the workshop. Following the first planning call the Center was asked by several partners already engaged in a grant to serve environmental information needs of Wilmington to halt plans for a workshop to allow them time to complete their activities. In an effort to not interfere with existing collaborations and networks, Center staff heeded the request but remained available to support whatever training or technical assistance needs the community had, including providing education on arsenic and asthma as well as addressing site-related questions regarding several Brownfield sites within Wilmington. Several nursing partners were identified to be included in the broader plans for an environmental health-nursing workshop.

Project/Community Name: Clearinghouse for a Healthy Community/Baltimore Community For Environmental Justice

City: Middle East Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Rosa Burenstine, Lucille Gorham

State Contact: Ev Paull (City), Art O’Connell (MDE)

EPA Contact: Lorie Baker

Institution/Center: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The community sought help with many issues; particular to our Center was establishing Brownfield designation for two abandoned sites, former Armco Steel Mill and Ainsworth Paint Factory. They also wanted assessment, cleanup, and redevelopment into something beneficial to the community including workforce development strategies.

Activities:

After initial contact from the community Outreach Staff sent an information packet to the group on Center Capabilities and had ongoing conversations with community members. The Program Manager and Outreach Director attended a community leaders’ meeting at Clearinghouse for a Healthy Community with other professionals from Morgan State and Johns Hopkins to discuss the many issues and goals of the group. Follow-up to the meeting included information gathering on Brownfield’s in Maryland and conversations with Art O’Connell, Chief of Site and Brownfield Assessments at MDE, and Ev Paull at Baltimore Development Corporation regarding the two sites. Outreach Staff submitted FOIA requests to MDE and was able to review site documents on Armco Steel and Ainsworth Paint. A FOIA was also submitted to and honored by EPA for the On Site Coordinators Report for Ainsworth Paint. Outreach Staff has attended subsequent community meetings to discuss information gathered on the two sites, to identify data gaps, and to plan for next steps. Outreach staff also facilitated a meeting with the community and Ev Paull, of Baltimore Development Corporation, to illustrate the process of Brownfield redevelopment in Baltimore City and available funding and partnering opportunities for the community to consider. Community members were invited to attend a session at the annual TOSC/TAB/EPA conference, held in Baltimore in March 2003, on the process of visioning for community development. Staff also provided information to community about EPA’s Brownfield Grant call for proposals and discussed avenues for developing partnerships with Baltimore Development Corporation, Maryland Department of Environment, and property owners to submit a project in Middle East Baltimore.

Project/Community Name: Highway Petroleum Abandoned Gas Station

City: Cumberland

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact:

State Contact: Jim Carroll

EPA Contact: Kristeen Gaffney

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

This site is part of the MDE Brownfield Assessment Grant application to EPA. This site was a former gas station and convenience store, abandoned since 1993. The USTs on site still contain product and the tank fill pipes are unlocked. Leaking from the tanks is suspected since odors are present in two observation wells. The Center has been contacted to perform community involvement related to the assessment project. In preparation of the grant submission, the Center began meeting and interviewing key informants to identify all possible stakeholders. The grant was awarded to MDE on 6/20/03.

Activities:

Before the grant was submitted Center staff conducted phone interviews with numerous contacts in an effort to identify all stakeholders and to understand priority issues in the area. Contacts included Walter Finster, Director of Environmental Health for Allegany County; Frank Billard, Principal at John Humbird Elementary School; Rose Nittenberg, Chair of PTA for John Humbird Elementary School; Diane Johnson, Director of Parks and Recreation for Cumberland; and Jim Ortez, President of South Cumberland Business Association.  After the award was announced Outreach staff contacted the various community members that had been interviewed originally to inform them that the grant was awarded and a timeline would be discussed shortly outlining the assessment project. Outreach staff contacted various stakeholders to set a date for the community meeting in February 2005 ahead of the proposed start of sampling in the first week of March. Staff prepared flyers for email and regular mail announcing the informational meeting. The first community meeting occurred on 2/23/05 at John Humbird Elementary School with about 20 community members attending. Staff followed up on information and questions received at the meeting and from evaluation forms completed at the end.

Outreach staff submitted a press release, placed the week before sampling, announcing the beginning of sampling and reminding residents to contact the Center with any questions and that a follow-up community meeting would be held when the sampling results are complete. Outreach staff created and distributed to all stakeholders a fact sheet discussing the preliminary testing results. Staff also collaborated with MDE and local stakeholders to host a follow-up meeting, held September 21, 2005 at John Humbird Elementary School. Five community members and local government officials attended. MDE presented results and discussed possible next steps for the site. Outreach staff provided information on potential TAB assistance to the community past the end of the MDE Assessment Grant. Participants completed evaluation forms and outreach staff followed up on any remaining questions. Minutes were compiled and distributed to attendees and via the email list serve.

Project/Community Name: Former Baltimore Transformer and Coil Brownfield

City: Elkridge

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Lindsay Turner, Community Law Clinic

State Contact:

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Baltimore Transformer and Coil Company, located on ½ acre at 5859 Washington Blvd, had been closed for about 4 years but, is now being renovated. Community members have expressed concerns about the possible contamination on site from a former TCE spill and the possible presence of PCBs. The community contacted the Community Law Clinic for help in obtaining documents, particularly the EPA PCB Inspection Report, related to the site. The Clinic requested the Center’s help in reviewing the document and providing interpretation and comments to the community.

Activities:

The Center received call from Lindsay Turner at the Community Law Clinic requesting technical assistance on behalf of her client, a resident near the site in Elkridge. Both the project manager and engineering consultant reviewed the PCB inspection report as well as other engineers associated with the Center. Feedback was provided to the community member through the Community Law Clinic. Center staff later responded to a request for information from Congressman Cardin’s office related to the document review and comments provided in July 2003. A summary document was sent followed-up with a phone conversation. Following Cardin’s office’s response letter to the community, outreach staff received a phone call from the community member who originally contacted the Community Law Clinic to discuss concerns about outstanding questions about the site and possible availability of more information than the outreach team had access to before. The team agreed to review any further documents the community could provide and then determine appropriate next steps.

Project/Community Name: East St./Carroll Creek Brownfield Sites/Parcel “G” Brownfield Sites

City: Frederick

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Pat Keegin, Frederick Department of Planning; Rich Griffin, Frederick Department of Economic Development

State Contact: Karl Kalbacher, MDE , Jim Carroll, MDE

EPA Contact: Kristeen Gaffney

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

This site is part of the MDE Brownfield Assessment Grant application to EPA. There are about 8 sites proposed for assessment all within the downtown commercial district of East St. and Carroll Creek. The grant will focus on Parcel G, located at East and Patrick St., now and two other sites in the near future. The Center has been contracted to perform community involvement related to the assessment project. In preparation of the grant submission, the Center began meeting and interviewing key informants to identify all possible stakeholders. The grant was awarded to MDE on 6/20/03.

Activities:

In preparation for grant submission Center staff attended a meeting with Richard Griffin, Director of Economic Development for Frederick City to gather background information on the sites to be assessed and what groups in the area may be impacted. Center staff then conducted phone interviews with numerous contacts in an effort to identify all stakeholders and to understand priority issues in the area. Contacts included Larry Bohn, Director of Environmental Health for Frederick County Health Department; Ellen Ristorcelli, Director of Nursing for Frederick County Health Department; Helen Monk, Health Services Specialist and liaison to Frederick County Public Schools; Madeline Morey, Local Management Board coordinating services for families and children; Emily Daniel, Director of Frederick Families First; and Tom Lynch, Committee for Frederick. After the award was announced Outreach staff contacted various community members that had been interviewed originally to inform them that the grant was awarded and a timeline would be discussed shortly outlining the assessment project.

Outreach staff also attended the EPA’s press event awarding the check to MDE at one of the Brownfield sites in Frederick. MDE sent UMBSON a final MOA for approval, which was signed and returned 5/14/04 officially establishing TAB’s role in the project. Outreach staff met with MDE on 5/17/04 to understand the current work being done, plan for future activities on-site, and timetable for the whole process. Staff then contacted the various community stakeholders previously identified to help set up an initial informational community meeting Outreach staff identified key stakeholders in the City Planning Department, at the local health department, in the local government, public school, and community organizations. Staff developed background information, an invitational flyer and postcard, and distributed to over 400 contacts. The outreach team facilitated a conference call between TAB, MDE, and Frederick City Planning Department to organize a community meeting. The initial community meeting was held 9/16/04 at the local library. Twenty community members attended the meeting and evaluation forms were distributed and collected to gather feedback and more information on community concerns, additional questions, and how they would like to participate in the future. It was decided by the community members that they would like to have another meeting when all the sampling data is in for the site, tentatively predicted for December or January.  Additionally, staff provided information to community about EPA’s next cycle of Brownfield Grants call for proposals. Outreach staff assisted community members in identifying contact person in City Government to discuss the proposed Hope VI housing plan further. Following sampling, staff facilitated communication between Frederick City and MDE as the draft testing results were being reviewed.

Staff collaborated with Frederick City and MDE to organize and facilitate the second community meeting to discuss sampling results and next steps, held 6/1/05 at the Frederick County Board of Education. Prior to the meeting email and post card announcements were distributed. Ten community members and local government employees attended. Staff facilitated the meeting and recorded minutes. Staff reminded community members that although the MDE Brownfield Assessment Grant is technically completed, TAB services are still available to the community if they are interested in staying involved throughout the rest of the cleanup and redevelopment process. Following the meeting, staff developed a fact sheet based on the sampling results and distributed it with the minutes to the distribution list previously compiled. Following email and hard copy distribution of the minutes and fact sheet, staff responded to various phone and email inquiries about the results and public health protection measures.

Project/Community Name: Superfund and Brownfield Sites in Herring Run Watershed

City: Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Darrin Crew, Herring Run Watershed Association (HRWA); Lynn Ward, Armistead Gardens Homes Corporation

State Contact:

EPA Contact: Matt Mellon, Amelia Libertz, Carrie Deitzel

Institution/Center: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TOSC/TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

There are multiple Brownfield sites and one Superfund site of concern in this community. 68th St. Proposed NPL Site: The HRWA was awarded a TAG grant for this site. The Center assisted the community until they hired a technical advisor with this funding. The Center also provided guidance in areas not covered by the TAG. The site, covering 235 acres, was initially proposed to the NPL in 1999 and is now reproposed after EPA collected more supporting data. The site consists of several former landfills and contamination includes metals, PCB’s, and PAH’s. There are offsite impacts to local waters including the Herring Run, Moore’s Run, and Redhouse Run leading into the Back River and Chesapeake Bay. Lower Herring Run Park: This former landfill currently owned by Baltimore City, is for sale and the city is considering a nine-hole golf course proposal. The Community, particularly Armistead Gardens,  requested the Center to review the Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation Report conducted by an EPA contractor.

Activities:

68th St.: Outreach staff attended planning meetings at Herring Run Watershed Association regarding the final listing of the 68th St. Site on the NPL. Outreach staff also attended a site tour and attended meetings with EPA, local elected officials, MDE, and community stakeholders related to the proposal of the site to the NPL and to address community concerns about fish consumption. Lower Herring Run Park: Outreach staff reviewed and commented on the PA/SI for the Lower Herring Run Park site and discussed findings with community members in preparation for a meeting with the city and the golf course company. At the meeting the comments were taken into consideration for next steps.

General:

•   Outreach staff met with EPA EJ Intern working with HRWA for the summer to provide guidance and information on assessing the communities in the Herring Run Watershed area with regards to environment, economic, health, and social aspects.

•   Community members attended a session at the annual TOSC/TAB/EPA conference, held in Baltimore in March 2003, on the process of visioning for community development.

•   Community Members attended a Risk Communication Workshop sponsored by ICMA and UMBSON, where Outreach staff presented information on communication techniques.

Project/Community Name Little Washington

City Upper Marlboro

State MD

EPA Region Region 3

Community Contact Darryl Harris, President

State Contact

EPA Contact

Institution/Center University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB) TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

This community was concerned about a variety of facilities that impact the health and quality of life of its residents. There are clean fill landfills, rubble landfills, asphalt facilities, construction companies, and trash transfer companies, as well as the dust, traffic, and vehicle emissions that accompany these industries. The community requested the Center to attend and present at a community workshop to inform residents of environmental health impacts in the area.

Activities:

5/31/03 – Presented at a workshop for community members on the basics of environmental health and possible exposures in their area and went on a tour of 24 sites of concern in the area. See links for copy of presentation and handout. (http://www.jhu.edu/hsrc/ehimpact_files/frame.htm and http://www.jhu.edu/hsrc/eh%20impact%20handout.pdf)

Project/Community Name: Brown Derby Abandoned Gas Station

City: Princess Anne

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Various Stakeholders

State Contact: Karl Kalbacher and Jim Carroll, MDE

EPA Contact: Kristeen Gaffney

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

This site was part of the MDE Brownfield Assessment Grant awarded by EPA. The Brown Derby is an abandoned gas station that has been vacant for 10-15years. The USTs and fuel pumps are still present on site as well as propane tanks and evidence of a former dry cleaning business. A creek that drains into the Manokin River and a new housing development, Somerset Landing, borders the site. The Center was contracted to perform community involvement related to the assessment project. In preparation of the grant submission, the Center began meeting and interviewing key informants to identify all possible stakeholders. The grant was awarded to MDE on 6/20/03.

Activities:

Before the grant was submitted, Outreach staff conducted phone interviews with numerous contacts in an effort to identify all stakeholders and to understand priority issues in the area. Contacts included Mike McIntyre, Director of Environmental Health for Somerset County Health Department; Colleen Parrott, County Health Officer for Somerset County Health Department; Jim Webster, Principal for Greenwood Middle School; Tammy Schoolcraft, School Nurse for Greenwood Middle School; Debby Dean, Principal of Princess Anne Primary; and Amy Mills, School Nurse for Princess Anne Primary. MDE and EPA continued negotiations on the final approved work plan and timeline for the site. In the meantime, Outreach staff re-contacted various community members that had been interviewed originally to get their input on additional contact lists and location for an introductory meeting for the project. Outreach staff also visited the site, took photographs, and surveyed the surrounding area for potential stakeholders to contact once assessment work began.

MDE sent UMBSON a final MOA for approval, which was signed and returned 5/14/04 officially establishing TAB’s role in the project. Outreach staff met with MDE on 5/17/04 to understand the current work being done, plan for future activities on-site, and timetable for the whole process.

Outreach staff contacted various stakeholders to set a meeting date for 1/20/05 and worked with local community, business, and government representatives to ensure all stakeholders were aware of the project and invited to the meeting. Staff prepared flyers for email and regular mail announcing the informational meeting. Twelve people attended the meeting and staff received calls from several community members before hand who could not attend the meeting but who had questions. Audience members completed evaluation forms indicating preferred methods of further communication and involvement. Staff placed a press release in the local paper, as requested by the participants during the first community meeting, the week before testing occurred, the week of June 13th. Outreach staff created and distributed to all stakeholders a fact sheet discussing the preliminary testing results. Staff also collaborated with MDE and local stakeholders to host a follow-up meeting, held September 22, 2005 at Greenwood Elementary School. Five community and local government representatives attended. MDE presented results and discussed possible next steps for the site. Outreach staff provided information on potential TAB assistance to the community past the end of the MDE Assessment Grant. Participants completed evaluation forms and outreach staff followed up on any remaining questions. Minutes were compiled and distributed to attendees and via the email list serve.

Project/Community Name: Lester’s Garage Abandoned Gas Station

City: Salisbury

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Various community and local government representatives

State Contact: Jim Carroll, MDE

EPA Contact: Kristeen Gaffney

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

This site was part of the MDE Brownfield Assessment Grant awarded by EPA. This site is a former Getty service station and auto repair shop with UST’s still present. Old cars and debris are on site and there is possible media contaminated with petroleum. The station has been abandoned for about 15 years, but the property appears to be in use. A day care center and older residences border the property. The Center was contracted to perform community involvement related to the assessment project. In preparation of the grant submission, the Center began meeting and interviewing key informants to identify all possible stakeholders. The grant was awarded to MDE on 6/20/03.

Activities:

Before the grant was submitted, Outreach staff conducted phone interviews with numerous contacts in an effort to identify all stakeholders and to understand priority issues in the area. Contacts included Linda Griffith, Wicomico County Health Department; Angela Eaton, School Nurse at Pemberton Elementary; and Rosie Edwards, owner and operator of Group Day Care Center. MDE and EPA continued negotiations on the final approved work plan and timeline for the site. In the meantime, Outreach staff re-contacted various community members that had been interviewed originally to get their input on additional contact lists and location for an introductory meeting for the project. Outreach staff also visited the site, took photographs, and surveyed the surrounding area for potential stakeholders to contact once assessment work began. MDE sent UMBSON a final MOA for approval, which was signed and returned 5/14/04 officially establishing TAB’s role in the project. Outreach staff met with MDE on 5/17/04 to understand the current work being done, plan for future activities on-site, and timetable for the whole process. Outreach staff contacted various stakeholders to set a date for an informational community meeting in May. Due to difficulty obtaining access to the property, MDE had to postpone sampling until June 2005. Staff, in collaboration with the local community and MDE, organized and facilitated the meeting, held May 11, 2005. With the assistance of the local government developing the distribution list, post card announcements were created and mailed out. Staff facilitated the meeting and recorded minutes. Evaluation forms were also collected from the participants and any remaining questions were followed-up. After the meeting, staff distributed minutes to all participants. Since testing was scheduled so close to the meeting date (week of May 23), it was decided by participants that a press release in the paper was not necessary. Staff did continue to address questions received and added additional community members to the distribution list.

Outreach staff created and distributed to all stakeholders a fact sheet discussing the preliminary testing results. Staff responded to an email from a community member with concerns about recent clearing of the site and possible exposure to arsenic contaminated dusts. Staff then collaborated with MDE and local stakeholders to host a follow-up meeting, held September 12, 2005 at Pemberton Elementary School. Fifteen community members and local government officials attended. MDE presented results and discussed possible next steps for the site. Outreach staff provided information on potential TAB assistance to the community past the end of the MDE Assessment Grant. Participants completed evaluation forms and outreach staff followed up on any remaining questions. Minutes were compiled and distributed to attendees and via the email list serve.

Project/Community Name: Brooklyn/Curtis Bay – Potee-Garrett St. Site

City: Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Carol Eschelman, Linda Bardo, Scott Stafford

State Contact: Evans, Paul (City)

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

This 8-acre site was initially a landfill followed by a junkyard/auto salvage operation that has been vacant for the past 15 years. Contaminants on-site include petroleum contaminated soils, drums of roofing material, lead, heavy metals, methane gas, and possibly UST’s. The site is currently owned by the State of Maryland but was to be purchased by Baltimore Development Corporation and assessed under their EPA Brownfield Assessment Grant. The community requested The Center’s assistance with technical information and help with distributing information to the community.

Activities:

Outreach staff attended a meeting with the Brooklyn Curtis Bay Coalition and prospective developers to discuss mutual goals and how to move forward on redevelopment plans. An MOU was established with the community group. Outreach staff attended several meetings of other groups in the area to determine additional questions and other hazardous waste site issues in the community. Staff met with several key leaders for these groups to determine learning needs and best use of TAB’s services. The Center reviewed and provided feedback on site related environmental data obtained from Baltimore Development Corporation and MDE. Outreach staff also provided comment to EPA on the Brownfield Assessment Grant proposal submitted by Baltimore Development Corporation related to the site. Additionally, staff provided information to community about EPA’s next cycle of Brownfield Grants call for proposals. Based on a community request, staff supplied additional instruction about determining a list of other Brownfield’s in Curtis Bay area.

Project/Community Name: Multiple Brownfields – Park Heights

City: Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community: Contact Henri Thompson

State Contact: Bernie Pinner, Andrew Sawyers

EPA Contact: Reggie Harris

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Park Heights community has several probable Brownfield sites along with other environmental and health issues. The community, headed by the Park Reist Corridor Coalition, is seeking help to identify, prioritize, and address the myriad of issues.

Activities:

Outreach staff met with PRCC’s Executive Director and community organizer along with clinical faculty from UMBSON and a representative of St. Ambrose community center to begin discussions and plans for moving forward. Another meeting was held with UMBSON, Morgan State, and PRCC to determine scope of TTAB project awarded to Morgan and what additional topics will need other support from the broader Center. UMBSON reviewed the draft agenda for the training and advised as it pertained to environmental health issues. Outreach staff also assisted the community to identify environmental testing data for a particular brownfield site in the area.

Additionally, staff informed the community group about EPA’s Brownfield Grant call for proposals and the grant writing workshop held 9/10. PRCC’s executive director was able to attend the meeting and indicated obtaining useful information and pointers. Outreach staff created and presented a training module on Autobody Shops Environmental Health and Safety Concerns as part of a workshop series conducted by Morgan State. Staff gathered information on a Brownfield site of interest to inform the community about what is already known and what additional questions need to be answered regarding contamination and reuse potential and reported back to the community group. Staff then guided PRCC in next steps to report anecdotal information of possible historical contamination.

Project/Community Name: Baltimore Environmental Justice Network

City: Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Various Community Group Leaders

State Contact: Dorothy Morrison

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TOSC/TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Several community groups in Baltimore (Park Reist Corridor Coalition, Baltimore Community for Environmental Justice, Hispanic Apostolate, Brooklyn Curtis Bay, and Washington Village/Pigtown) recognized the need to jointly address common environmental health issues plaguing their neighborhoods. While waiting for the results of an EPA CARE grant proposal, the group moved forward to assess priorities and identify action plans. The group asked for assistance with identifying Brownfield issues and creating strategies to address them and to engage the larger community of Baltimore City in education and involvement.

Activities:

Staff attended monthly Network meetings and provides guidance on identifying environmental health risks and financial and technical resources. Staff also assisted in identifying learning needs and strategizing educational outreach plans. After identifying common priorities, the communities were planning a citywide educational forum on environmental health impacts of solid waste and pest control to identify common issues and collaboratively strategize actions to help mitigate impacts. The group collaborated with MDE, City Health Department, and City Department of Public Works and Sanitation. The workshop held on April 22, 2006, was hosted by UMSON, TOSC, and Washington Village/Pigtown community, with the other participating  communities invited.

Project/Community Name: Box Hill South

City: Abingdon

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Sally Raphel

State Contact:

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Box Hill South community had concerns about the formerly closed and unused Spencer Landfill site in their residential neighborhood. The landfill, capped in 1992, did not meet current regulations. There was a proposed plan in the County’s 10-year Solid Waste plan to build a new landfill in order to raise funds to properly close and contain the former landfill. The community asked for assistance regarding information related to prior contamination and current requirements for the closed landfill. Also they asked for help understanding the possible health risks and community impacts related to reuse of this site.

Activities:

Outreach staff provided guidance on obtaining information from MDE on prior environmental issues and current investigations. Staff also educated community contact on follow-up questions in regards to reuse plans of the improperly maintained and closed former landfill.

Project/Community Name: Baltimore City Soil

City: Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Lou Takacs, Washington Village Pigtown Neighborhood Planning Council; Madeleine Shea, Baltimore City Health Department; Rich Pouyat, Center for Urban Environmental

Research and Education; David Jacobs, National Center for Healthy Housing

State Contact: Dorothy Morrision, MDE

EPA Contact: Ann Carroll, US EPA Headquarters

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Center was asked for assistance in evaluating possible heavy metal soil contamination of abandoned lots in Baltimore City, including analysis of human health risk and developing a risk communication plan if necessary. CHSUE staff partnered with University of Maryland School of Medicine, Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education at UMBC and the Baltimore City Health Department.

Activities:

Staff facilitated and participated in monthly meetings and periodic email conversations discussing creation of Healthy Homes Kit for Baltimore City residents and further investigation into soil contamination, including development of a remediation plan and risk communication plan. Staff also provided guidance on securing financial and staff support for the project. Staff hosted a meeting at UMSON on 12/13/06 to solicit guidance from US EPA staff and others involved in prior vacant lot reclamation and remediation projects. Staff assisted in identifying range of questions, activities, partners, and potential funding sources for the various aspects of the soil contamination issue. Staff hosted a meeting at UMSON on 2/20/07 to facilitate discussion about potential funding to continue assessment, intervention, and educational efforts. Staff facilitated meetings with the various stakeholders and provided guidance and research materials to support the group’s submission of a proposal addressing assessment, intervention, and educational efforts for the contaminated soils issue. Staff coordinated community meetings to encourage early and ongoing engagement of key stakeholders the planning process.

Project/Community Name: Carroll County MTBE

City: Carroll County

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Karen Merkle, Chair Environmental Advisory Council; Ed Singer, CC Health Department

State Contact: Herb Meade and Jim Richmond, MDE

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Carroll County has over 100 cases dealing with leaks of MTBE and other gasoline contaminants. Some groundwater contamination has been detected in drinking water wells. The issues were brought before the Environmental Advisory Council to the County Commissioners and Center Staff was asked to provide information and public education on the contaminants, health effects, monitoring, and cleanup issues. Additionally, staff assists with other questions from the Council related to environmental health.

Activities:

Center Staff provided information to the council and community members on the gasoline contaminants, potential health effects, and assessment and cleanup techniques. Staff also attended various community meetings hosted by CC Health Department and MDE and attends monthly Environmental Advisory Council. Staff collaborated with the EAC and MDE to create a reporting system and assisting the Carroll County Health Department to create and disseminate educational materials for the general public. A county-wide workshop on gasoline and well water issues was also proposed. Staff assisted in creating a well-water FAQ that was posted on the County Website and hard copies were distributed in the public library system. A PSA also aired concurrently on the local cable station. Talks were also initiated with fuel dealers in Carroll County to offer an incentive program for removal of heating oil UST’s. Staff also researched, reported on, and developed educational materials for fluoride, radon, and nitrates in drinking water; water conservation; and information on reducing climate change impacts through energy efficiency and residential and commercial use of compact fluorescent light  bulbs.

Project/Community Name: Eastalco

City: Frederick

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Pam Rigaux

State Contact: Art O’Connell, MDE

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Center received a request for assistance to identify and navigate the available environmental information for the former Eastalco Aluminum Smelter site in Frederick, MD. The plant closed in December 2005 and the Alcoa Company is planning to donate a portion of the site to the nearby community group for public parkland. Residents want to be sure there is no environmental impacts from operations at the plant that would put the community at risk if the land were redeveloped for public use.

Activities:

Staff spoke with a community member to assess questions and concerns about the site. Staff conducted an Internet search of EPA and MDE’s websites and then contacted MDE to determine what, if any, information is available. Information gleaned from the Internet and conversations with MDE’s State Superfund project manager was passed onto the community member as well as guidance on appropriate next steps, FOIA requests, and other contacts at MDE that may be of assistance. The community member requested more information on understanding the basics of site investigations, laws and regulations governing cleanups, and community involvement rights. Staff met with the community member and provided education on many background topics. Staff met again with a concerned citizen to discuss remaining questions about the site – particularly related to fluoride in groundwater. Staff reviewed documents obtained from MDE and the 2 environmental consultant reports from Alcoa and developed comment sheet for discussion with the community member. Staff also created a document answering the specific questions asked at the prior meeting. Information was reported to the community member in a follow-up meeting along with discussion of next steps.

Project/Community Name: Jacksonville Exxon

City: Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Dr. Carol Copeland, Glen Thomas

State Contact: Herb Meade, MDE

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Per MDE Fact sheet (http://www.mde.state.md.us/assets/document/Exxon_Jacksonville_Release_FactSheet_022206.pdf), on February 17, 2006, two of the four monitoring wells at the Jacksonville Exxon Station exhibited liquid phase hydrocarbon (LPH). MDE Oil Control Program (MDE-OCP) suspects that approximately 25,000 gallons of regular unleaded gasoline was released from one of the underground lines that transport gasoline from the UST to the fuel dispensers. The property and vicinity are located in a high-risk groundwater use area served by drinking water wells and private septic systems; consequently, protection of the groundwater is a concern. On February 21, 2006, ExxonMobil began sampling all drinking water wells located in the southwest quadrant of the half-mile radius. This quadrant is down gradient of the station. Groundwater flow at the site, based on previous environmental reports, is south-southwest. Many residents receive bottled water from Exxon, but residents whose wells were nondetect still use their well water for laundry, showers, etc… Wells within a ½ mile radius of the gas station will be sampled monthly.

The Center became aware and involved after a community member contacted the Center for help understanding the process and issues related to the gasoline leak. Initial questions focused on: What are the shorter-term effects of exposure to be alert for? (Not just cancer). Even though they have bottled water for drinking, is it ok to shower/do laundry? Does the fact that the pipeline was pressurized change how the release will move in groundwater - both speed and direction? Also, there are long-term concerns about property values.

Activities:

Center staff had an initial conversation with a community member and an email conversation with the community association president. Staff began gathering background information, including conversations with MDE on investigation progress, and attended the community meeting held Thursday 3/9/06. Staff also developed a fact sheet on possible health effects of gasoline contaminants for  distribution to the community.

Outstanding community questions from the 3/9 meeting included: 1) What are health impacts of long-term low-dose exposure to gasoline derivatives through dermal contact from showering and laundering? 2) What are health impacts of long-term low-dose exposure to gasoline derivatives through inhaled vapors from showering and laundering? 3) What are the health impacts of long-term low-dose exposure to vaporization into the ambient air in and outside of homes? 4) What is the effect on property values? Will ExxonMobil take responsibility for lost value?

Following the 3/9 meeting, staff responded to several calls from community members with questions about possible health concerns and ways to protect households from exposure. Staff, including an environmental health nurse, environmental engineer and toxicologist, attended a community meeting on 3/30/06 and answered questions regarding environmental health impacts of gasoline exposure. Staff also attended additional meetings on 4/18/06 and 4/20/06 to answer further questions. The Center compiled questions from the meetings, researched answers to the questions, and developed a Q&A document that was distributed to community members and other stakeholders.

Project/Community Name: Washington Village/Pigtown

City: Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Lou Takacs, WVPNPC; Marjorie Buchanan, UMSON

State Contact: Dorothy Morrison, MDE

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden/Johanna Neumann

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Washington Village/Pigtown is struggling with a variety of environmental issues including, among other things, an abundance of Brownfield sites. Many partners, including MDE, UMSON, Washington Village Pigtown Neighborhood Planning Council (WPNPC), and others are collaborating to address the multiple environmental issues in the community.

Activities:

Environmental Stewardship Workshops: Staff collaborated with Baltimore City communities, Maryland Department of Environment, University of Maryland Schools of Nursing and Social Work, and other partners in the city and state government and academic resources to host a Talkin’ Trash workshop for Baltimore City residents addressing issues of solid and hazardous waste management in the City and empowering communities to be involved in problem solving. The workshop was held on Earth Day, 4/22/06, and 120 residents attended. Staff provided copies of educational and promotional materials to community groups on CD’s. Follow-up plans from the workshop included holding another educational activity in November to coordinate with Baltimore City Recycling Day.

Soil Contamination Investigation:  Staff was asked for assistance in evaluating possible heavy metal soil contamination of abandoned lots, including analysis of human health risk and developing a risk communication plan if necessary. CHSUE staff partnered with University of Maryland School of Medicine, Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education at UMBC and the Baltimore City Health Department. Staff conducted a literature search for best management practices to remediate residential soil and attended several planning meetings.

Brownfield Redevelopment: Staff assisted WPNPC in identifying environmental testing requirements for a property that is changing zoning and being redeveloped as multi-unit residential. Staff also connected the community to the Community Development Coordinator at MDE, Luke Wisniewski, to further answer questions and provide guidance on Brownfield redevelopment.

Project/Community Name: Rail Road Roundhouse

City: Newburg

State: MO

EPA Region: Region 5

Community Contact: Marvin Helms

State Contact: Christina O’Keefe

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

As part of an overall goal to revitalize the town, the community of Newburg, led by the Phelps County Community Partnership, is seeking to purchase the Railroad Roundhouse property for redevelopment as nature park/trails. Phase I and II environmental assessments are under way while the town negotiates with the railroad for purchase. Region 3’s outreach team was contacted by the Midwest Center for collaboration related to an environmental health community assessment as part of the TAB services being provided.

Activities:

Outreach staff interviewed key informants from the community, the state health department, the state department of natural resources, and the public school. Staff also conducted Internet research to identify data related to environmental health in Newburg and compared to county and state.

Project/Community Name: West Philadelphia PCE Brownfield Site

City: Philadelphia

State: PA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Rev. Larry Falcone and Ann Dixon, Neighbors Against McPenntrification

State Contact: Walter Payne, PA DEP; Tom Barsely, PA DPH Air Management Division

EPA Contact: Chris Thomas

Institution/Center: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The community was concerned about health effects related to VOC (particularly PCE) vapor extraction at a site of a future McDonalds, located at 4240 Market St., Philadelphia, PA. The community requested information on alternative methods of remediation, information on health monitoring, and case studies of other communities involved in PCE exposures.

Activities:

Outreach staff conducted literature search and information gathering on PCE remediation and case studies to send to community. Region 3 also collaborated with George Hoag at UConn (Region 1) and Michael Fernandez (Western HSRC) for advice on remediation options and experience with similar type-sites. Program manager traveled to Philadelphia for a site visit, met with community members, and performed a document review of relevant site information at PA Department of Public Health. Program manager also conducted interviews with various members of WhiteStone Consulting Firm (for McDonalds), Department of Commerce, Department of Air Management, State Department of Environmental Protection, and Regional EPA. Region 3 continued to collaborate with George Hoag regarding documents reviewed and interviews conducted and submitted the review and options available in writing to the community. Program manager further supported community empowerment by attending an appeal hearing related to the air management permit. The center answered further questions from the community related to Thermal Desorption following the hearing.

Project/Community Name: Pen Argyl

City: Pen Argyl

State: PA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Judy Piper

State Contact: William Tomyako, PA DEP Northeast Region Waste Management, Senator Lisa Boscola

EPA Contact:

Institution/Center: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The community of Pen Argyl is concerned about possible health effects from an existing landfill and the further effects of a proposed 27-acre expansion of the site. They requested information on possible health effects related to living near a landfill and guidance on developing a health study. They are also interested in the fate of a vacant industrial complex adjacent to the landfill, which is unoccupied for various reasons including perceived contamination, and blights the community. In addition to the Center’s assistance, Barbara Brady, a nurse researcher, and Erik Rifkin, an Environmental Risk Management Consultant have also aided the community. Ms. Brady has consulted on the design of the community health registry survey and performed data analysis, interpretation, and developed a summary report. Dr. Rifkin reviewed the proposed risk assessment work plan from the landfill operators, along with other communications, and provided guidance to the community on their responses and further questions. Dr. Rifkin also reviewed and provided comment on the completed Risk Assessment document.

Activities:

Outreach staff performed literature and Internet searches to gather background data on the community and site. Program Manager, Region 3 Outreach Director, and several nurse consultants and graduate students attended community meetings in Pen Argyl to answer community’s concerns about the landfill and possible health effects. There was ongoing email and phone contact regarding development and distribution of the health survey conducted by community. The team provided critique and comments on the draft survey and cover letter and provided guidance and suggestions for coding, distribution, and data entry. The Center helped connect the community with a nurse statistician for data analysis and

summary of results. Outreach staff then collaborated with the Nurse Researcher to advise the community on conducting a health survey including attending several community and city council meetings, participating in multiple phone conversations, and participating in a press conference when the survey results were released. Staff discussed with the community plans for follow-up activities and priority next steps based on indications in the survey of areas of concern. The final report was placed on the Borough’s website. Staff created a presentation for the community to use in disseminating the results of the health survey. A final version was posted on the Center’s website following edits from the community. Outreach staff also connected the community with a volunteer risk assessment consultant

who reviewed the work plan for Waste Management’s proposed risk assessment study and provided guidance on response to the proposal. Outreach staff reviewed odor-monitoring data and provided information on comparison levels and possible health effects related to the contaminants present. Staff also preformed a literature search for best practices for odor management and information on fragrance

chemical used in misters which was provided to the community. Outreach staff assisted the community in their plans for a Landfill Workshop and collaborated with the nurse research consultant who presented information on the health survey http://www.jhu.edu/hsrc/penargyl.htm Community members were invited to attend a Risk Communication Workshop sponsored by ICMA and UMBSON, where Outreach staff presented information on communication techniques. Unfortunately, their representative had to cancel at the last moment. They were provided with the materials from the conference. A process evaluation form was sent the community to obtain feedback about the technical

assistance services provided by the Center and to give direction for the future of the partnership. Two completed evaluation forms were returned. Overall comments were positive. The next goals they identified included disseminating the results of the health study to the public, developing action steps following the survey, assessing ongoing effects of the landfill, and conducting public education and outreach on the priority issues. The community requested help identifying ways to accomplish these goals. The community received results from Waste Managements Risk Assessment looking at exposure to dust and particulate matter. The community requested the Center to review and comment on the results. Although this particular document is not related to the Brownfield, our Center tried to provide assistance in the form of referrals to other groups who could provide assistance and Mr. Rifkin volunteered his time to review and comment on the assessment. Comments were given to the community contacts. Staff provided information to community about EPA’s next cycle of Brownfield Grants call for proposals.

Project/Community Name: Chester

City: Chester

State: PA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Reverend Strand, Faith Initiative

State Contact: Alice Wright

EPA Contact: Reggie Harris, Hal Yates

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Chester has a long history of industrial use and documented poor land use, both currently and historically. Community leaders requested assistance from the HSRC to provide leadership development training and education about current environmental and health conditions and to identify ways community members can be involved. The Center partnered with the community, PA DEP, and EPA to create and host the workshop in September 2005.

Activities:

Staff participated in multiple phone conversations with the various partners to identify needs and plan for the workshop. Staff also gathered background information on environmental and health conditions in Chester and identified possible financial and organizational resources that may be available. Staff also worked to identify other stakeholders to include in the planning, presenting, and follow-up stages.

Staff attended a guided site tour with community members and PA DEP Representative on 8/30/05 to gather more information about environmental health concerns and to gain familiarity with the area. Staff presented information on environment and health conditions in Chester at the seminar, held 9/13/05. Thirty community leaders attended. As follow-up from the workshop, Outreach staff attended the first planning meeting of the Chester Environmental Leadership Committee on 10/11/05 and provided input on possible educational topics for the group related to environment and health issues. Outreach staff recorded minutes at the second meeting of the Leadership Committee on 11/16/05, and helped facilitate discussion as the committee finalized its name and mission statement. Staff also agreed to advise and comment on the goals and plans of the environment subcommittee. Staff attended the Chester Environmental Partnership meeting on 1/11/06 and participated in further discussions on focus and projects. Guidance was provided on process and resources for addressing the environmental issues identified, including recycling.

Staff attended the Recycling Subcommittee meeting, a part of the Environmental Protection Subgroup, on 1/26/06. Following the subcommittee meeting and after reviewing the agenda for the March 8 Partnership meeting, staff initiated a phone conversation with Rev. Strand as the key community contact. Staff confirmed the current focus of the group moving more towards monitoring currently operating facilities, discussing resident recourse and compensation, and recycling. Since the current key issues are not within the Center’s technical assistance mandate for Brownfields, it was mutually decided that staff will monitor the progress of the group by reviewing meeting minutes and if any land use issues or educational needs arise in the future, services are always available to the group. Staff also passed along a referral for an Environmental Justice Consultant that may be able to meet the needs of the group that the Center is not able to address.

Project/Community Name: Pottstown

City: Pottstown

State: PA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Janine Legg, Mayor Ann Jones

State Contact:

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Following a presentation to the PA Environmental Justice Advisory Board, Ms. Legg contacted the Center and requested TAB assistance for Pottstown, PA. Although primarily concerned with a currently operating municipal waste landfill that was to close in October 2005, the town also had many potential Brownfield Redevelopment Opportunities.

Activities:

Center staff had several conversations with Ms. Legg and Mayor Jones to assess what the learning and technical assistance needs of the community were. Staff also compiled a list of possible funding resources at the state and federal level and also what other Brownfield sites may be in the area that could be addressed by the municipality. Staff reviewed various documents related to the closing landfill and provided comment on confidence in various expert opinions and suggestion for productive and financially prudent actions. Staff also referred community to several resources in PA and EPA that could provide further assistance.

Project/Community Name: Northern Liberties

City: Philadelphia

State: PA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Hilary Regan

State Contact: Bruce Beitler, PA DEP

EPA Contact: Carrie Dietzel; Marcos Aquino; Amelia Libertz

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

There are multiple Brownfield sites in and around the Northern Liberties area of Philadelphia. The initial request from the community, in January 2006, was related to the Liberty Homes project, situated on 0.99 acres formerly used as a tannery and a warehouse/machine shop. There have been several environmental investigations including an EPA Preliminary Assessment and Emergency Removal, a TSCA PCB evaluation, Phase I and II assessments and a Baseline Environmental Report. The site is known to have soil contaminated with arsenic, chromium VI, and pentachlorophenol and groundwater contaminated with lead, TCE, and PCE. The site is under redevelopment for mixed-use residential/commercial. The community is concerned that the remediation is not being done in a protective manner. They have asked for the Center’s help in reviewing documents and assessing protocols.

Activities:

Staff received a referral from an environmental activist contact in Philadelphia and contacted the community members to offer assistance. The community provided background of the situation and a variety of site-related documents for review. Staff reviewed documents for two brownfield properties in the Northern Liberties neighborhood and attempted to set up an introductory meeting with interested community members. Following several attempts to set the meeting, staff did send comments on the reports and community questions to the community contact. There was no contact back from the community at that time. Dr. Caroline Baier-Anderson, a toxicology consultant with the Center, presented a talk on Risk Assessment at a Brownfield 101 conference in Philadelphia. Following the conference, a community member from the Northern Liberties area requested review of several documents related to several different sites. Dr. Baier-Anderson provided some general remarks but requested the community meet with TAB staff to establish priorities before beginning document review. In addition to offering direct services, staff assisted in identifying possible local resources that could help the community organize a Brownfield Alliance to develop priorities and goals and better utilize the available technical assistance through TAB.

The community later contacted our Center to review four more documents related to the American Tannery Site. An engineering consultant reviewed the documents and provided the community with comments and suggested questions. Outreach staff facilitated conversations and response to follow-up questions. Staff responded to calls from the community and discussed options for engaging with EPA in ongoing conversations while awaiting release of data and reports from the recent sampling and ATSDR’s public health assessment document. Once the PHA was released, outreach staff and engineering consultant reviewed and provided feedback to the community.

Project/Community Name: Ambler Asbestos Piles/Bo-Rit

City: Ambler

State: PA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Sharon McCormick

State Contact:

EPA Contact: Larry Johnson, CIC

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

Ambler Asbestos Piles was formerly an NPL site and a portion was investigated, remediated, and de-listed. An adjacent portion of the site, containing a partially-fenced, vegetated asbestos pile, was under active assessment by EPA and ATSDR for public and environmental exposure risk. The community sought to work with EPA to establish a CAG, but was not eligible for TAG assistance at that time.

Activities:

Staff responded to phone and email messages from the community requesting technical assistance. Staff reviewed some background documentation and talked with EPA representatives to learn more about the site and ongoing investigation. Staff discussed process and technical information with the community member and sent referrals for additional resources available to help the community participate in the assessment process.

Project/Community Name: Pathan Chemical Site

City: Philadelphia

State: PA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Carol Phillips

State Contact:

EPA Contact: Amelia Libertz

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Pathan Chemical Site is located in a residential area at 427 Moyer Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Site was an abandoned, unsecured building with most of the windows and some of the doors broken out, and showed evidence of trespassing and fires. The Site in the past operated as a textile facility and a manufacturing facility for detergents and fabric softeners. There was EPA emergency removal activity on-site in the 1990’s and then a fire occurred in March 1999. There remain questions about soil contamination and the site is under PA Act 2 Brownfield redevelopment process.

Activities:

A community member contacted the Center for guidance on understanding technical site documents, current potential health risks, health risks associated with residential redevelopment, site health and safety plan during remediation, PA Act 2 regulations, PADEP right-to-know policies, and who to contact for accessing site related information. Staff discussed cleanup process, community involvement procedures, and follow-up questions to ask. Staff also provided suggestions for additional technical support organizations.

Project/Community Name: Swimming Point Civic League

City: Portsmouth

State: VA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Maggie Brydges

State Contact: Jim Cutler, VA DEQ VRP, Pat McMurray, VA DEQ Toxicologist

EPA Contact: Jane Zhu, ATSDR Environmental Health Scientist

Institution/Center: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The site was a former manufactured gas plant previously owned by Columbia Gas of Virginia, which was bought by NiSource Company. Remediation of the site, contaminated with PAH’s, VOC’s, Mercury, and Arsenic, is being conducted under Virginia’s Voluntary Remediation Program. Community wants information on testing and remediation activities, planned reuse of the site, and health effects of exposure to contaminants, as well as guidance on becoming more involved in the cleanup process.

Activities:

The Program Manager and a nurse consultant traveled to Portsmouth to attend a site tour and participated in community meeting afterwards to assess the needs and concerns of community members and questions directing next steps. Stemming from the community meeting the Center was requested to review a resident’s soil and well sampling data and to comment on health risks related to any contamination. Outreach staff gathered information for the community on elevated urban background levels of arsenic and lead. Also collaborated with VA DEQ toxicologist, ATSDR, Portsmouth

Health Department Lead Program, EPA Region 3, MDE, Center for Health, Environment, and Justice toxicologist, the Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning, and Region 2 and Region 5 HSRC TOSC/TAB staff. Outreach Staff reviewed soil and water test results for a community member and discussed with the homeowner and a potential buyer what the health implications might be and how to reduce exposures. Outreach staff engaged in ongoing phone conversations with members of the Swimming Point Civic League as issues and information arose. Outreach staff reviewed the field investigation report prepared by RETEC Group, Inc., the contractor for Columbia Gas of VA, real time air monitoring results for VOC’s, Dust, Mercury, and Noise, and documents held at VA DEQ related to the site. Staff collected information on site contaminants and possible health effects.

The staff collaborated with Jim Cutler, VA DEQ Voluntary Remediation Program, to gather information on the site and DEQ’s involvement; Jane Zhu, ATSDR Environmental Health Scientist regarding involvement at site, impressions of health threats, and forthcoming report once data is complete; and Pat McMurray, VA DEQ Toxicologist, regarding impressions of site and risks to public health. There were frequent emails and phone conversation as new questions arose and this information was passed onto the community as well as suggestions of ways to move forward and what questions remain to be answered. Outreach staff also had conversations with Sydeny Rice, NiSource Public Affairs, about site remediation and redevelopment plans, current operations, and community involvement protocol and Roger Hathaway, RETEC site manager, on progress at site of data collection and remediation.

Project/Community Name: Swimming Point Civic League(2)

City: Portsmouth

State: VA

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Marlene Nusbaum

State Contact:

EPA Contact:

University: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Center received a call from a community member based on Internet searching and the prior assistance provided to the Swimming Point Community in 2002. The community member had concerns that contamination detected on her property may be related to the MGP site. She requested technical assistance in reviewing sampling reports and guidance on next steps for her to take. (The MGP site was a former manufactured gas plant previously owned by Columbia Gas of Virginia, which was bought by NiSource Company. Remediation of the site, contaminated with PAH’s, VOC’s, Mercury, and Arsenic, is being conducted under Virginia’s Voluntary Remediation Program).

Activities:

Staff reviewed and provided comments on soil sampling reports from community member’s consultants and NiSource. Sought assistance from EA Engineering to help with additional questions related to risk assessment and remediation. Staff facilitated a conference call with Ms. Nusbaum, EA Engineering, and HSRC. Staff monitored conversations between Ms. Nusbaum and EA Engineering related to a proposed risk assessment and possible work to fingerprint the PAH’s.

Project/Community Name: Brook-Hancock-Jefferson Metropolitan Planning Commission

City: Weirton

State: WV

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Doris Davis

State Contact:

EPA Contact: Kristeen Gaffey

Institution/Center: University of Maryland School of Nursing

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Barbara Sattler

Project Manager/Coordinator: Robyn Gilden

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities Conducted:

Project Description:

The Brooke-Hancock-Jefferson Metropolitan Planning Commission was selected to receive a Brownfield Assessment grant. The commission has targeted about 30 potential brownfields in two rural counties in the northern panhandle of West Virginia, also known as Appalachia. Most of the brownfields are the result of the demise of steel and other industries in the region. A 70 percent reduction in jobs has occurred from the loss of the steel industry alone. Hancock County has the slowest growth rate of all West Virginia counties, and per capita income in the two counties is lower than the national average. Assessment and cleanup of targeted areas will encourage redevelopment of properties, create greenspace, and address health concerns in a region with one of the highest cancer rates in the country. A task force created by the commission will continue to reach out to community-based organizations to involve citizens in assessment and reuse issues. The BHJ MPC requested assistance from the Center for community outreach and technical assistance during the 2-year project.

Activities:

Center staff met with Doris Davis, of BHJ MPC, to discuss community outreach for the proposed assessment sites. A proposal was submitted by the Center for review and revision. Center staff spoke with Ms. Davis again at the Brownfield 2003 conference in Portland, OR in October 2003 and she indicated at that time the community was still interested in the Center’s involvement but they were not yet ready to make a formal request.

Project/Community Name: Park Heights Reisterstown Corridor Community (PRCC)

City: Baltimore

State: MD

EPA Region: Region 3

Community Contact: Mr. Henri Thompson/ Mr. Derrick Charles

State Contact: None

EPA Contact: None

Institution/Center: Morgan State University

Outreach Director/Manager: Dr. Gbekeloluwa B. Oguntimein

Workshop Coordinator: Dr. G.B. Oguntimein

Allocation (TOSC, TAB): TAB

Project Environmental Issues, Center Commitments (MOU), and Activities planned:

Project Description:

The outreach team located at Morgan State University (MSU) has provided technical assistance to the Park Height Reisterstown Road Corridor Coalition Community (PRCC) for over six years through an environmental and economic impact study of Brownfields sites (Lu et al., 2001) and a survey of auto body shop operations located in the community (MSU CHSUE report 2002). The major population in this area is African-Americans. Based on the recommendation of our survey report, the community requested MSU to conduct a training workshop for the auto body shop operators. This resulted in a TTAB grant to MSU. The objective of this proposal is to train operators of auto body shops and auto-mechanics on the environmental impact and occupational safety of their operations. This training included imparting awareness regarding the risks associated with the use of equipment, methods to make the working environment safer and the use of protective equipment and environmental effects of chemicals used.

Activities:

  1. A series of workshops were organized in conjunction with UMBSON. The workshops covered the following topics: i) Occupational Exposures and Health Issues presented by Kate McPhaul, RN, MPH of the Department of Family and Community Health, University of Maryland on October 20, 2004; ii) Various Workplace Hazards, Their Identification, and Preventive Measures presented by Bheem P. Kattel, PhD, CPE of the Department of Industrial, Manufacturing, and Information Engineering, Morgan State University on November 3, 2004.
  1. We had a meeting on April 21, 2005 to discuss the grant possibilities with the PRCC director and planned for the strategic planning meeting.
  1. A Strategic-planning meeting for the PRCC was hosted by MSU on June 8, 2005. Present at this meeting were EPA officials from the Office of Environmental Justice, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Maryland Department of Environment, Baltimore city Department of planning, Wiley Environmental Strategies, Community Law Center and representatives of the Auto body Association. The outcome from this meeting include: i) a series of planning meetings with Baltimore City Planning Department for the creation of the auto park. The Community Law Center has been reviewing all Federal, State, City, and landlord/tenants rights laws as they apply to the Auto repair business. ii) Wiley Environmental Strategies has registered the Northwest Baltimore Automotive Association as members of the Minority Business Owners Association. iii) Morgan State University Schools of Engineering and Business has continued training on environmental issues helped with technical support in structuring and strengthen NBAA. iv) Saint Ambrose Outreach Center has developed a youth focus environmental awareness education program. v) UMBSON has created an information resource booklet on health and education as it relates to the auto body industry.
  1. The third workshop on OSHA regulations for Autobody workshop operators took place at the PRCC Center on April 19, 2006. This lecture was delivered by Mr. Andy Alcarese, CIH, and CSP a Program Manager from the Maryland Office of Safety and Health (MOSH) Consultation Services. The presentation covered standards in auto body shops, categories of occupational hazards, Control of chemical hazards and training and educational opportunities available for small businesses from the MOSH.
  1. We were approached by the community to provide further technical assistance related to business portfolio development for small business. In cooperation with the Earl G Graves School of Business at Morgan State University the Northwest Baltimore Autobody Association was incorporated. The President of the organization is Mr. Derrick Charles, Vice president Mr. Willie Godfrey and secretary/treasurer Mr. Sterlin Murriel.
  1. We have had a meeting on 06/06/2007 with the members of the executive Messers Murriel and Godfrey and Mr. Charles (by Telephone). The following points were discussed: a) The need for a follow-up on the workshops to determine what impact they have had on the operations of the auto-body shops. b) The need for a website for the association which would have information such environmental compliance codes for auto –body operation and SP2 training material. c) The need to generate more interest among operators and support from the city department of housing and State environmental department. d) Mr. Godfrey volunteered to have his secretary call up members to have their opinion and suggestions on how to revive the association.
  1. In addition to working with PRCC we had discussions with members of the Clearing House for a Healthy Community in East Baltimore on the environmental effects of exposure to various toxic and hazardous agents from a particle aggregating company (Baltimore Aggregate Recycling Company (BARC)) located in the area.
 
Appendix B:  Miscellaneous Outreach Activities Under the Collateral Grant
 
U.S. EPA Region I
 
  • TOSC has participated in three on line seminars related to perchlorate contamination in the second quarter of 2006. Perchlorate is a contaminant at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), which is Region 1’s largest project.
  • Region 1 TOSC attended the 2006 Community Involvement Conference and Training in Milwaukee June 27-30.
  • On October 29, 2005, TOSC staff conducted a short course on Soil, Water, and Air Testing as part of the Environmental Justice Conference hosted by the Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice in Hartford, CT.
  • Outreach Advisory Committee Meeting: On November 19, 2004, the Region 1 TOSC staff successfully hosted the Annual Outreach Advisory Committee (OAC) Meeting at the University of Connecticut. A total of 24 people were in attendance with an additional 2 people brought in by conference call. There was very diverse attendance at the meeting, with representatives from each of the Universities, USEPA Headquarters and each region, community groups, industry and the states.
  • Two TOSC staff attended the Community Involvement Conference in Buffalo, NY, July 12-15, 2005.
  • TOSC/TAB was an invited speaker at the EPA New England All Grantees Workshop in Sturbridge, MA August 9-10, 2005. We gave presentations on risk communication, community involvement and an overview of the TOSC and TAB programs.
  • Narragansett Tribe (Charlestown, RI): TOSC STAFF had discussions with the tribe regarding on-site training in oil spill response. TOSC also provided support to the Town of Charleston and the tribe to determine the impact of a proposed development project to the groundwater supply for both the town and tribe.
  • Penobscot Tribal Nation, ME: TOSC staff provided the tribe with advice on laboratory equipment purchases and training for their own expanding laboratory operations.
  • City of Hartford Lead Abatement Program: TAB has served as a member of the Mayor’s Task Force on the City’s Lead Abatement Program. We assisted the City on strategic planning and HUD grant review. As a result of the Task Force activities, the State Department of Public Health continued to be satisfied with progress made to bring the department and its activities into compliance.
  • Council of Governments Brownfield Steering Committee, Hartford, CT: TAB was advising the Hartford County Council of Governments on their Brownfields Redevelopment. TAB became a member of the contractor interview committee and provided input during a four day process, in which the committee reviewed contractor proposals, commented upon them, and provided the recommendation s to the full committee. As a result TAB served as a member of the Brownfield’s assessment steering committee and advised the committee during their scheduled meetings.
  • Providence RI: TAB provided comment on a proposed capping and future use of the Ponagansett Avenue landfill to the Trust for Public Land. This trust was responsible for developing recreational uses for the property. We met with the Trust, received the plan and toured the site. Additionally in Providence, TAB reviewed several large documents including sampling reports and a preliminary risk assessment and provide written comments regarding a proposed school and YMCA on a former silver factory.
  • Walpole, MA: TAB assisted the City in the reviewing remediation options and future uses of an asbestos contaminated site. TAB attended five meetings during this project period. The City is currently considering reuse options for several properties. TAB was asked to comment on likely proposed “cap” remedial actions and advise the City on risk and risk communication, however the program ended prior to this becoming a full TAB program.
  • Stamford, CT: Outreach staff had preliminary discussions with the representatives of the City of Stamford Land Use Bureau concerning the use of a parcel of land that is contaminated with coal tar residues (used as fill material). This land was planned for use as a commuter-parking garage and a new interstate off ramp. The surrounding community had initially raised health concerns regarding the proposed disturbance of the old deposits. TAB was to work with the City on risk communication; however the program ended prior to this becoming a full TAB program.
  • Stratford, CT: TAB was in the early stages of assisting the City of Stratford with the redevelopment of a coastal Brownfields parcel. We entered into a MOU with the City and have attended 1 meeting; however the program ended prior to this becoming a full TAB program.
  • Sprague, CT: TAB was contacted by the Town of Sprague to assist in their cleanup up of an historic trap and skeet range the town purchased as part of an open space acquisition. As traditional cleanup methods would cost several million dollars, which the town does not have and it was interested in exploring alternative remediation methods. TAB facilitated 2 meetings with the University of Connecticut Plant Sciences Dept to use phytoremediation to initiate clean up. The University/ Town proposal was reviewed by the EPA and CT DEP; however the program ended prior to this becoming a full TAB program.
  • Region 1 TAB coordinated the TAB booth at the National Brownfield’s Conference in Boston in November, 2006. Region 1 TAB personnel staffed the booth as needed during the four day conference.
 
U.S. EPA Region II
 
This report highlights the activities beginning with FY 2002 for TOSC and TAB projects funded either directly by U.S. EPA or through the Center for Hazardous Substances in the Urban Environment at Johns Hopkins University and carried out by personnel at NJIT.
 
 
NHSRC Lead Projects
 
During the time of this program, apart from the projects and inquiries described in more detail below, members of NHSRC participated in and led many other closely related activities. The related programs were undertaken with a goal of raising the level of visibility of the TOSC/TAB programs that were available in order to encourage potential clients to come forward, as well as to provide opportunities for the TOSC/TAB success stories to become known. In addition, opportunities to build upon the resources of the program to advance related Brownfield and Superfund community assistance issues seemed an appropriate obligation for general environmental improvement and public health.
 
The NJIT portion of the project carried out activities throughout Region II, including extensive activities in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Working closely with Region II personnel, significant advances in community involvement and planning for Brownfield redevelopment activity have been made in both Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. It can be expected that continued community technical assistance will be important in those areas in the future, based in part on the work carried out as part of this program. Significant assistance has been provide in New York State—with a particularly large time investment in the upper Hudson area related to the PCB remediation activity. Because the remediation effort per se in that project is just getting underway, continued involvement by future technical assistance efforts will be required—both for the wide area CAG and for the specific effort focused on health and safety impacts at Fort Edward, where the dewatering facility is being constructed. In New Jersey, continuing programs—particularly the remediation of the Lower Passaic River superfund site which is just beginning and other areas where activity is continuing will need further technical and community assistance. The program has had numerous successes. The result of many of the successes is that there are community requests for additional and continuing services.
 
Among the major activities during the period of performance were the following.
 
  • Finalized the U.S. EPA Region 2 Brownfields Redevelopment Guidance Document which became available on the NHSRC website and by CD distributed by Region 2 at the BF 2002 Conference and later
  • Developed the U.S. EPA Region 2 Expert System Model
  • Delivered many Brownfields presentation at the New Jersey Brownfields Roundtable and similar venues
  • Conducted Brownfield Pilot Grant Stakeholder meetings for many communities throughout Region 2
  • Provided technical facilitation for the New York state Brownfields roundtable quarterly meetings
  • Conducted non-pilot outreach meetings; in New York and in New Jersey
  • Developed a NHSRC fact sheet for the U.S. EPA Region 2 Brownfields Internet site
  • Participated in the environmental cleanup conference conducted by the Southwest Hazardous Substance Research Center in Rio de Janeiro - presentations were made on applications of Field Analytic Methods
  • Investigated site characteristics at several sites using TAB funding and funding from the Technical Innovation Office of USEPA, which were developed as case studies
  • Attended the EPA TOSC/TAB National Conferences
  • Provided support to the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council for their Brownfields and Sampling, Characterization & Monitoring Teams
  • Conducted a workshop held in Thailand on establishing sampling and analysis programs at the government level for compliance monitoring purposes.
  • Continued implementation of projects outlined in the collateral funding received from U.S. EPA Region 2 Brownfields Program:
    • Held the City of Bayonne Brownfields Workshop on December 4, 2003
    • Developed and facilitated a roundtable for about 65 professionals from New York state Brownfields assessment communities. The roundtable was held in Albany NY and discussions included the EPA program, the new New York state Brownfields legislation, Brownfields opportunity areas, and vapor intrusion issues.
    • Developed and facilitated a workshop for Brownfields stakeholders in the U.S. Virgin Islands focused on voluntary cleanup programs. About 35 people attended from the islands of St. Johns, St. Thomas, and St. Croix.
    • Consulted with Virgin Island Department of Planning and Natural Resources staff on the design of a voluntary cleanup program (VCP). A subsequent meeting included legislative staff to provide information and recommendations for a future VCP initiative.
    • Facilitated a week-long meeting with 10 communities, federal government officials, and Puerto Rico Commonwealth officials on Brownfields development and needs. Work with the communities involved mentoring through a process to identify, design, and present needs as well as future actions.
    • August 3- Upstate New York Community/Interagency Workgroup Workshop: Workshop for community representatives with federal and state government agencies on Redevelopment related to Brownfields. NJIT helped communities in preparation of presentations and facilitated one day workshop. Communities attending were from City of Utica, City of Oneonta and Broome County.
  • August 19, 20- Puerto Rico Community/Interagency Workgroup Workshop: Workshop for community representatives with federal and Commonwealth government agencies on Redevelopment related to Brownfields. NJIT helped communities in preparation of presentations and facilitated two day workshop. NJIT also provided tracking and reporting of progress on commitments made with a dozen communities at February 2004 workshop. New Communities attending were Luquillo, Toa Baja, Arecibo and Ponce.
  • Non-CHSUE Funded Projects Relevant to TOSC and TAB Initiatives:
    • Implementation activities associated with the USEPA-NJIT cooperative agreement on the use of the Triad framework in the Assessment and Community Assistance using an Areawide Approach. We assisted in the review process for redevelopment proposals on the Elizabeth (NJ) Development Corporation’s highest priority redevelopment site. We also conducted a follow-up survey of the non-respondents (potential bidders who opted not to submit a proposal) to determine which factors influenced their decision not to bid; this report will be used to modify future redevelopment offerings. An extensive search of groundwater files was conducted and reviewed to build an area wide GIS based groundwater depiction of the Elizabethport area. The first step, which involved obtaining from the NJDEP an area wide well search for well records within a one mile radius of the Elizabethport area, produced nearly 1000 records. These records were culled to create a subset that contained soil boring logs, ideally in wells that penetrated to bedrock. Field verified data were used to construct a GIS database to show the location of the well and other information about the well ownership, purpose and lithology. The area was narrowed further to depict the zone within Elizabethport that would benefit most from and has the greatest potential for redevelopment. Meetings with Elizabeth officials confirmed the team’s conclusions which allowed NJIT to request access to the NJDEP public groundwater quality records for wells within the area. Records were searched at NJDEP during the third quarter 2005 and copies of relevant monitoring records were requested. This initial work led to the preparation of a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) for the area – a critical component of the Triad Approach that will be employed for the characterization phase of the project.
  • Implemented the technical assistance agreement for the Area Wide characterization component of the Hudson County Area Wide Assessment Project. Assistance included outreach to three target communities (Harrison, Kearny, and Secaucus) to identify locations within their towns to which the area wide assessment would be applied. Meetings were held with the mayors and town councils for each community to understand locations of anticipated redevelopment and the type of support they needed. Secaucus identified two properties along the Hackensack River to be incorporated into a river walk construction program. One is an abandoned small arm firing range and the other is an abandoned small manufacturing and metal working facility. Site visits were conducted to each with NJDEP and NJIT is currently developing Triad investigation work plans.
Harrison identified a city block within their redevelopment district for conversion from low use manufacturing to residential. NJIT met with the designated redeveloper to obtain background documents and tax maps and is currently developing an area wide investigation work plan. Kearny identified the Keegan Landfill as the target location. The landfill is located with the NJ Meadowlands Commission District and NJIT was aware of limited environmental investigations that were being conducted by the District. Unfortunately, the environmental data indicated the potential for substantial contamination and the site was dropped from Kearny’s list.
 
During the fourth quarter 2004, work began on developing investigation programs for the Secaucus sites. Secaucus has chosen to look at three properties, abandoned small arms firing range (SAFR), an unoccupied industrial building and a small warehouse and fabrication operation. NJIT assisted the Hudson County Economic Development Corporation in developing a triad based investigation program for characterizing these three properties. Secaucus wanted to incorporate these properties into a Hackensack River front park. A draft work plan was prepared for NJDEP and Secaucus review, and NJIT participated in meetings with the Town of Secaucus and NJDEP on the Triad approach and how it will be used on the Secaucus properties. NJIT prepared a Triad Investigation Work Plan for the SAFR and participated in meetings with the NJDEP Case Manger to discuss technical issues associated with the Triad SI/RI program. The SAFR Triad investigation workplan was completed and submitted to NJDEP. Also, a MOU was finalized between the NJDEP and the Town of Secaucus. A meeting was held with the engineering firm hired to support the field investigation and a meeting between them, the Hudson County Economic Development Corporation, and NJIT to discuss the contents of the workplan and the various roles of the stakeholders.
 
NJIT began work on additional sites in Hudson County that are the subject of the Hudson County Area wide Assessment program. These additional sites are Block 99 in Harrison and two publicly owned properties along Farm Road in Secaucus. NJIT began developing the work plans for the area wide assessments. NJIT continued meetings and work planning on additional sites in Hudson County that are the subject of the Hudson County Area-wide Assessment Program. These additional sites are in the Block 100 in Harrison, NJ. NJIT will begin developing the work plan for the area-wide assessments at Block 100. This will include the utilization of the EPA Region II Mobile Laboratory to provide assistance with the analytics.
  • Implemented a technical assistance agreement for the characterization component of the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission Paterson Plank Road (PPR) Brownfields Redevelopment Area project. NJIT worked with the Meadowlands environmental consultant to prepare a summary report of the environmental activities performed in the Brownfield cluster area along Paterson Plank Road. This included the Phase1 Background assessments, the results of the site inspections and the findings from the area wide environmental investigation. The intention was to give interested developers a “snap shot” of potential environmental issues so they could be factored into any redevelopment decisions. Additional activities included participation in the Technical Steering Committee meetings and assistance to the NJ Meadowlands Commission in preparing a case history that was distributed to property owners and other interested parties. This Case Study was posted on the NJMC web site and circulated to the towns within the NJMC. The preparation of the case study was the final product of the overall Paterson Plank Road Redevelopment Project and final deliverable to Region 2 EPA with regard to the Brownfield Pilot Grant given to NJMC to support the Paterson Plank Road Redevelopment Project. As part of the NJ Meadowlands Brownfield grant program and the Paterson Plank Road Redevelopment Area, an inventory of the overall distribution of potential Brownfield throughout the Meadowlands District was prepared. This was an ArcGIS based inventory that used different GIS land use layers to eliminate certain parcels from consideration as a Brownfield. Two presentations were made to the NJ Meadowlands Commission planning staff on the program and a final report is in preparation.
  • Participated in the NJDEP Triad/Brownfields Technical Committee, which is charged with exploring how the Triad Approach can merge with the NJDEP Technical Requirements. This included participation in a training program to improve Triad Approach capabilities in the state. At one meeting Mr. Mack provided a presentation of the progress of the Milltown Redevelopment Project and an overview of the findings. Also, the concept of collaborative data was discussed with NJDEP and how this interfaced with NJDEP Technical Requirements for Site Remediation.
    • Attended NJDEP Triad Committee meetings and prepared a draft paper for committee review on General Decision logic for Triad programs in New Jersey. Also worked with NJDEP to develop a Triad training program for NJDEP Case Mangers.
    • NJIT co-sponsored the Region 2 Land Revitalization Workshop that was held in March 2005. NJIT staff were involved in the planning of the Workshop and facilitated morning and afternoon sessions during the Workshop. Reviewed documentation for the workshop as well as the final report prepared by Vita Nuova which included the pre-conference preparation, workshop sessions and outputs and overall recommendations for continuing activities. Participated in follow-up activities aimed at continuing the momentum of the workshop.
    • NJIT co-sponsored an NJDEP state-wide community outreach event during the 3rd quarter 2004 on regulations and programs related to brownfields site redevelopment. The community workshop was entitled "Working with Site Remediation – An Overview of the Site Remediation Program for Communities." This workshop offered community members an opportunity to hear from other community groups, meet with NJDEP officials, and voice needs that TOSC and/or TAB might meet. This initiative was spearheaded by Judy Shaw (advisory committee member), and over 100 community members attended.
    • As a follow-up to the NJDEP community outreach event, we were approached by NJDEP on behalf of several communities to develop a TOSC “workshop” on Risk Assessment Principles for communities. This opportunity arose from community questions on NJDEP’s recent publication of draft Soil Remediation Standards. Community members from across the state expressed a desire to know more about Risk Assessment principles so they might be equipped to comment on the draft standards during the interested party review period. The workshop was held October 5, 2004.
    • We provided follow-up support for inquiries that were received during the Annual TOSC/TAB EPA National Conference on resources for migrant worker exposure to pesticides, expert systems, and the Magic Marker site in Trenton.
    • Presented the Triad Approach to NASA at their Energy and Environment Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
    • Presented the Triad Approach to GSA at their semiannual environmental retreat to assist in accelerating property transactions in Washington DC.
  • New York State Roundtable: NJIT assisted in the organization and conducted the facilitation and report summary of the New York State Brownfields Communities Roundtable, held in Rochester, New York on October 13, 2004. This Roundtable was attended by about 60 people from federal and state government, along with representatives from the EPA Brownfields Assessment Grant communities. These were an on-going series of meetings that foster communication between the communities and government in order to maximize the benefits of the federal and state Brownfields initiatives. At the Roundtable, there were updates provided by the federal and state agencies, community "success story" presentations, and detailed discussions on Brownfield Areas of Concern (BOA's). The major theme and discussions centered on local implementation of Institutional Controls.
  • Community/ Interagency Workgroup Meeting: NJIT participated and supported a Community/ Interagency Workgroup Meeting held in Bayonne, New Jersey on November 30, 2004. The meeting was attended by about 65 people from federal and New Jersey state agencies along with representatives from three communities -- the City of Bayonne, NJ, the City of Orange, NJ and Passaic County, NJ. NJIT prepared the community representatives to make focused presentations aimed at describing their redevelopment needs. NJIT also provided facilitation for the event to assure that the process would be interactive and beneficial, as well as preparing the summary - action report for the meeting.
  • VCP Training for US Virgin Islands Government: A 3 day training course in "Administering the Voluntary Cleanup Program" was provided for about 15 staff of the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Planning and Natural Resources in St. Croix, U.S.VI on February 14 - 16, 2005. The training was provided by the Brownfields team at the NJIT-YCEES. This training supplemented earlier assistance which NJIT provided to the US Virgin Islands in developing and preparing legislation for this important Voluntary Cleanup Program. The course was primarily focused on the Department administration of the program and included: reviewing applications, preparing MOA's, overseeing site assessment and selecting remedial options. Training included advanced approaches using TRIAD and innovative technologies.
  • Interagency Workgroup Meeting in Puerto Rico: NJIT staff prepared 4 communities in Puerto Rico and facilitated an Interagency Workgroup Meeting for them with representatives from the federal government, Commonwealth agencies and the Governor's Office. The meeting was held in San Juan, Puerto Rico on February 17-18, 2005. The four communities participating were Guanica, Arroyo, Naguabo and Catano. At the meeting the communities, assisted by NJIT, presented their needs for redevelopment which covered a number of broad areas including environmental, transportation, waterfront development, recreation, housing, historical and cultural development, educational, economic development, etc. The government participants eagerly provided advice, brainstorming and agreement to pursue future, follow-up actions.
  • NJIT prepared communities and provided facilitation for an Inter-Agency Workgroup meeting which was held on August 18, 19, 2005 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. At these sessions, representatives from communities of Dorado, Vega Alta, Hatillo and Camuy briefed representatives from key US government agencies, Puerto Rico Commonwealth agencies and Governor’s Office on critical environmental and development needs including, environmental protection, land use, economic redevelopment, flood control, transportation and dredging. Facilitation was also provided for a separate session of government representatives on exploring ways to be more effective for helping Puerto Rico communities. About 60 people attended.
  • Explored possible collaboration opportunities with the New Jersey Economic Development Administration and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey on the use of Brownfields for support of inter-modal shipping operations expansion in the port area.
  • NJIT co-sponsored multi-organization (NJDEP and several community groups and environmental justice organizations) community outreach “workshop” on Risk Assessment Principles for communities. This opportunity arose from community questions on NJDEP’s recent publication of draft Soil Remediation Standards. Community members from across the state expressed a desire to know more about Risk Assessment principles so they might be equipped to comment on the draft standards during the interested party review period.
  • Held follow-up meetings with USGSA to determine if government owned Brownfields could benefit from the Triad Approach.
  • NJIT attended a four day Triad Workshop in Washington, DC. At the workshop NJIT gave a presentation on the Milltown Triad project as well as participated in two others related to Milltown.
  • At the request of USEPA Region 2, NJIT met with the RPM for Cornell-Dublier Superfund site. Region 2 is interested in applying the Traid approach to this site. NJIT reviewed the work plan for the OU-3 investigation and provided comments as to the applicability of Triad to this site.
  • The Weequahic Park Association (Newark, NJ) asked NJIT to consider a project to delineate and characterize sediments in the Lake on the site using a Triad approach. We met with the WPA leadership to explore the project.
  • East Orange, New Jersey - NJIT was asked to assist in a complaint regarding the cleanup of a former brewery; technical advice was provided to the citizens group on agency involvement and jurisdictional matters. Ultimately, NJDEP became involved through Judy Shaw, which resulted in a site visit to address the community concern.
  • NJIT received a portion of a $200,000 Brownfields Reassessment Grant as a partner to the City of Elizabeth for remediation of the Livingston Street site. NJIT’s role was to carry out a demonstration of a contaminated building investigation and to conduct a TRIAD investigation of the site. This is in many ways a result of beneficial· activities with the City that have been carried out previously as part of the Center’s programs.
  • NJIT continued providing technical assistance to the New Jersey School Construction Program. This included these major activities: (1) supervising site assessments in both Camden and Trenton. In Camden, an assessment was made of a site for arsenic impacts planned for an Early Child Development Center. In Trenton, an assessment was made of a site for TCE impacts planned for an Early Child Center; (2) providing an inventory of the Kelly Drum facility in Camden which has been acquired by eminent domain for the possible construction of a new school; (3) developing an evaluation process tool to aid in land acquisition decision making for land intended for new school construction; (4) providing technical support for presentation to Trenton Board of Education; (5) development of a Triad RPF. This continuing relationship with the School Construction Corporation represents a significant outcome of previous Center activities with potential for long-lasting benefit to residents in the urban areas of New Jersey.
  • NJIT participated with the community of Fort Edward, New York in several planning meetings involved with a New York State Brownfields Opportunity Area grant (BOA) and an EPA Brownfields Assessment Grant. Plans are being made for broadening the exploration of opportunities, particularly emphasizing the eco-tourism aspects of the Upper Hudson River clean-up.
  • NJIT participated in a number of planning calls and meetings to develop a workshop for educators to outreach information and education on the historic PCB cleanup of the Hudson River. The workshop will be hosted at Adirondack Community College for representatives from local and regional educational system from elementary through college.
 
U.S. EPA Region III
 
Communication/Information Dissemination/Publication
 
  • Facilitated Center-wide outreach conference calls.
  • Created and continues to maintain the Center-wide website (www.jhu.edu/hsrc) until support staff at JHU was able to take over. Provided updates on community progress, pictures of sites, resources, and contact information. Also included was a series of Power Point presentations developed by the Program Manager addressing common toxics found at Superfund sites, their health effects, and ways to reduce exposure. These presentations were also shared with other HSRC’s and submitted for posting on www.envirotools.org.
  • Article published in Policy, Politics, and Nursing Practice Journal, January 2003. The article discusses community involvement at hazardous waste sites highlighting the School Siting issue in order to raise awareness of data gaps and need for legislation to protect children and staff from hazardous exposures. Also included in the article is a summary of the HSRC Outreach program and its capabilities.
  • Outreach staffs from Region 3 and Region 1 collaborated to design and produce a brochure for outreach activities distributed to communities and other stakeholders.
  • Program Manager and Outreach Director collaborated with the Health Sciences/Human Services Library at UMB and the National Library of Medicine to discuss development of an online repository of environmental health materials that can be used for community education and outreach.
  • Program Manager developed an interim community satisfaction evaluation tool.
  • Program Manager created a module on contaminated soils and community outreach for the on-line Advanced Environmental Health Nursing class that is part of the Environmental Health Nursing Master’s Degree at University of Maryland School of Nursing.
  • Outreach team distributed information to all MD community contacts about the EPA/MDE Brownfield Grant Writing Workshop held 9/10/04. Staff attended the meeting as well, to introduce TAB to the participants and hand out brochures.
  • Information about TAB services was distributed to workshop attendees at the EPA/WV DEP Brownfield Grant Writing Workshops 9/28/04 and 9/29/04.
  • Outreach staff notified communities of grant opportunities, including EPA Brownfield Training and HUD Brownfield Economic Development Initiative Grants and EPA CARE Program RFP.
Collaborations/Meetings
 
HSRC
  • CHSUE Staff meet with representative from the Midwest HSRC to complete transition between HSRC I and II Brownfield projects.
  • Outreach staff convened a conference call with the Midwest HSRC to collaborate on several communities in Region 5 that have health related questions. Region 3 provided guidance and referrals for connecting with health professionals near the sites.
  • Program Manager attended the annual TOSC/TAB meeting in Estes Park, CO and presented information on the Region’s Outreach work as well as resources for Environmental Health assessment and surveillance in communities.
  • Outreach Staff attended the Brownfield’s 2005 Conference in Denver, CO November 2-4 to learn from other communities’ experiences and share expertise and lessons learned.
  • Outreach Staff assisted in planning and hosting the Center’s Outreach Advisory Committee’s annual meeting, held Friday November 18, 2005 at University of Maryland School of Nursing. In addition to reporting on activities in the Region over the past year, staff also organized two community panels to provide feedback from communities being served and to assess suggestions for improvement in the future.
  • Outreach staff attended the HSRC/EPA Annual meeting in Atlanta in March 2006 to share lessons learned and discuss Center sustainability issues and preserving tools and accomplishments into the future.
Headquarters
  • Outreach staff attended the HSRC Director’s meeting in DC and participated in discussions related to improving the visibility and impact of the outreach portion of the Center.
  • Outreach staff met with Jennifer Browne (EPA), John Harris (EPA), and E2 Inc. to discuss forming new collaborations on Superfund Redevelopment Partnerships enhancing both programs and improving services to communities.
  • Outreach Director attended the TAB briefing to collaboratively discuss Brownfield Projects and the addition of Environmental Health as a resource.·Region 3 Outreach Staff participated in a briefing for EPA Headquarters on Center activities.
  • Center staff met with US EPA in Washington, DC on 9/15/06 to discuss strategies for incorporating public health interventions and education into contaminated land projects and other environmental programs.
Regional
  • Staff met with various representatives from EPA Region 3 in Philadelphia.
  • Program Manager and Outreach Director collaborated with Regional Administrator Donald Walsh and his staff on improving utilization of public health professionals in environmental protection activities. Similar collaborations were discussed with Dalton Paxman, Region 3 Health Administrator for US Department of Health and Human Services.
State
  • At the state level, staff met with Maryland Department of the Environment, the Maryland’s Governor’s Office of Smart Growth, Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation, West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, and Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to introduce the Center and determine points of collaboration with Superfund and Brownfield sites in the various states.
  • Outreach staff met with PA Department of Environmental Protection in Harrisburg to introduce HSRC to PA and identify areas where the center could assist.
  • Outreach staff introduced Center and services to the Community Redevelopment (Brownfield) Coordinator at Maryland Department of Environment and the Brownfields Coordinator for Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control.
Local
  • Being based in Baltimore, outreach staff felt it particularly desirable to engage local representatives working on Superfund and Brownfield issues. They have included the President of Cleanup Coalition, Baltimore Development Corporation, developers from Streuver Brothers, Eccles, and Rouse, and the Director of Herring Run Water Association, among others.
  • Project staff worked with several churches in the Baltimore City area on Environmental issues including, but not limited to, redevelopment of vacant lots, public health concerns around demolition practices, and lead exposure from soils and dust inside homes. The goal was to form a Faith-based Environmental Coalition to help address common concerns, strengthen implementation of interventions, and improve dissemination of educational information.
  • Program Manager provided guidance to undergraduate community health nursing students during their clinical experience on issues related to brownfields, community redevelopment, and environmental stewardship. This included building partnerships with UMBC Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education, Baltimore City Health Department Office of Healthy Homes, and seven churches in the Baltimore Area.
  • Outreach staff attended the Baltimore Brownfield Coalition meeting and provided comments on the proposed MD Brownfield legislation to be introduced this session. Recommendations focused on the need to ensure public participation is early and meaningful in the process.
Topic-specific
  • Program Manager collaborated with representatives from NOAA and NEETF to improve Environmental Health knowledge of Meteorologists so they improve communication with viewers on risks to their health and ways to protect them.
  • Program Manager worked with APHA’s Environment Section and Public Health Nursing Section to increase awareness of community outreach needs at hazardous waste sites and how, as health care professionals, they can have a role.
  • Program manager attended the Environment and Health Forum meetings in DC to network with other agencies involved in protecting health and the environment and to provide knowledge on areas of Nursing and hazardous waste issues. Also participated on the Advocacy Subgroup to offer expertise to legislators on environment and health issues.
  • Outreach staff participates in planning meetings for MD Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and MDE’s CDC health tracking grant. Staff provided input on utilization of databases and access to information for communities.
General Technical Assistance
  • Outreach team provided education and technical assistance to 2 Baltimore communities on grant writing and seeking additional funds to address EJ issues in their communities.
  • Outreach staff responded to a request from a resident in Baltimore City concerned about uncovered piles nearby creating black dust in his apartment. Staff made initial inquiries with the Baltimore Development Corporation and Maryland Department of Environment and helped make connections with resources.
  • Staff responded to a call from Right-to-Know Committee in Philadelphia requesting assistance analyzing results from a health survey conducted by the group. Staff referred them to an Environmental Justice Consultant in the Philadelphia area who agreed to voluntarily review the survey and collaborate to identify next steps based on the results.
Environmental Justice
  • Program Manager attended EPA’s EJ training in DC to gain knowledge and to ascertain how the training may be adapted to fit the needs of communities, local municipalities, and state agencies in Region 3.
  • Program Manager was chair and Outreach Director was a member of the Community Health and Protection subgroup of the Governor’s Commission on Environmental Justice and Sustainable Communities working to ensure communities have access to information and resources related to environmental health issues.
  • Outreach Director is a commissioner and program manager attends the Governor’s Commission on Environmental Justice and Sustainable Communities, assisting to highlight and address EJ issues in Maryland communities. They also participated in Environmental Equity forums sponsored by the commission to assess regional community concerns in Maryland.
  • Program Manager attended the MD Black Caucus legislative meeting on Environmental Justice Issues and participated in an advisory role to the Caucus on EJ and Health Issues.
Center Staff Development/Trainings
  • Attended Greening Brownfields seminar hosted by Region 3 EPA and Baltimore Development Corporation where staff gained knowledge about Brownfield redevelopment and made connections with those in Region 3 participating in Brownfield cleanups.
  • EPA’s Community Involvement Conference in Portland, OR that provided an opportunity to meet and learn from others working in community involvement around the country representing diverse backgrounds, focuses, and agencies.
  • The outreach Program Manager also attended a GIS conference to discover how technologies can be used to improve identification of needs and increase community understanding and involvement at cleanup sites.
  • Program Manager attended training sponsored by Physicians for Social Responsibility on Dynamics of Capital Hill to better understand the political climate and how to best represent the Center to legislators.
  • Outreach staff attended MD Environmental Legislative Summit to gain awareness of the issues facing Maryland General Assembly.
  • Outreach staff attended the National Children’s Environmental Health Conference to learn the newest research and to help translate that to communities’ needs.
  • Program Manager attended a grant-writing workshop to increase skills to share with communities and to help secure additional funding for Center to move towards self-sufficiency.
  • Program Manager attended a training workshop sponsored by Physicians for Social Responsibility on the Emerging Links Between Chronic Disease and Environmental Exposure in order to understand the latest research and how to translate it into understandable terms for communities.
  • Outreach staff attended a 40-hour Civil Mediation Certification Training course to enhance conflict resolution and mediation skills available to communities.
  • Outreach staff attended the MDE workshop entitled “Emerging Trends in Maryland’s Voluntary Cleanup Program” to gain understanding of new policies and procedures to better inform communities of changes and how they can participate in the process.
  • Program Manager attended the two-day Mid-Atlantic Cumulative Risk Workshop in Philadelphia to gather knowledge and add Environmental Health Nursing insight.

Supplemental Keywords:

TOSC, TAB, outreach projects, Brownfields, RFA, Scientific Discipline, Air, INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION, Geographic Area, Waste, POLLUTANTS/TOXICS, particulate matter, air toxics, Chemicals, Analytical Chemistry, Hazardous Waste, Atmospheric Sciences, Hazardous, Environmental Engineering, EPA Region, Superfund site remediation, hazardous waste incineration, Chromium, Region 3, air pollution, hazardous waste incinerators, Zinc, airborne metals, cadmium, Region 2, arsenic, atmospheric chemistry, heavy metals, metals, Region 1

Progress and Final Reports:

Original Abstract