2003 Progress Report: Midwest Hazardous Substance Research Center

EPA Grant Number: R828770
Center: HSRC (2001) - Midwest Hazardous Substance Research Center
Center Director: Banks, M. Katherine
Title: Midwest Hazardous Substance Research Center
Investigators: Banks, M. Katherine , Novak, John T. , Reddi, Lakshmi N. , Voice, Thomas C.
Current Investigators: Banks, M. Katherine , Blanford, William , Brusseau, Mark , Gerba, Charles P. , Novak, John T. , Reddi, Lakshmi N. , Voice, Thomas C.
Institution: Kansas State University , Central State University , Haskell Indian Nations University , Howard University , Michigan State University , Missouri University of Science and Technology , Purdue University - Main Campus , University of Cincinnati , University of South Carolina at Columbia , Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
EPA Project Officer: Lasat, Mitch
Project Period: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2006
Project Period Covered by this Report: October 1, 2002 through September 30, 2003
RFA: Hazardous Substance Research Centers - HSRC (2001) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Hazardous Waste/Remediation , Land and Waste Management

Objective:

The objectives of the Midwest Hazardous Substance Research Center (MHSRC) are to further research, extend outreach, and advance technology transfer.

The Center's research focus is low-cost, natural remediation techniques that clean hazardous substances while enhancing redevelopment opportunities. The Center's research is national in scope and benefits many types of industry, including oil/gas processing and refining, automotive manufacturing, railroads, landfills, mining, and federal facilities.

Three services compose the outreach program: Technical Outreach Services for Communities (TOSC), Technical Assistance to Brownfields Communities (TAB), and Technical Outreach Services to Native American Communities (TOSNAC). TOSC and TAB provide technical education services to communities affected by hazardous substances in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regions 4 and 5, whereas TOSNAC assists Native American communities.

The technology transfer program seeks to advance the transfer of information and technology and to facilitate full-scale application of remediation technologies developed from Center research efforts. The program supports the overall mission of the MHSRC program by: (1) providing technology outreach to communities and industry; (2) providing training and information about hazardous substances and environmental issues; (3) advancing research through cooperation between centers, universities, and industry; (4) creating linkages between organizations; (5) advocating transfer of technology; and (6) involving underrepresented groups.

Progress Summary:

The MHSRC is one of five centers that compose Phase II of the HSRC program. Operations at the lead institution, Purdue University, began in October 2001. Purdue University and a consortium of nine other universities compose the MHSRC.

The Center is headed by Dr. Kathy Banks, professor of civil engineering at Purdue University. Dr. Banks is responsible for coordinating all of the Center's activities. There are three associate directors that lead the Center's technology transfer and outreach programs: Dr. John Novak, technology transfer program; Dr. Lakshmi Reddi, outreach in EPA Region 7; and Dr. Thomas Voice, outreach in EPA Region 5. The Center also benefits from guidance supplied by a Science Advisory Board (SAB) and Outreach Advisory Board (OAB).

Research funded by the MHSRC focuses on projects that result in integration of effective, managed natural remediation technologies into large-scale remediation plans. Particularly, after removal of the high-risk, highly contaminated material has been achieved, biological remediation methods may be combined with source removal strategies to enhance restoration of the ecosystem and site redevelopment strategies.

Six research projects were funded during the second year. All of the selected projects focus primarily on the development, optimization, or assessment of managed natural remediation systems. A unique feature of the MHSRC research program is the industrial involvement with each individual project. Each project funded by the MHSRC has an industrial and EPA advisor. These advisors provide important guidance about the project focus and direction. Table 1 lists the six projects, and includes information about the principal investigators (PIs), project goals, and industrial and EPA science advisors. Separate annual reports have been submitted for each of the MHSRC sponsored projects.

Three new research projects were awarded grants effective October 1, 2003. The three new projects are:

Phytoremediation of Cyanide Contaminated Soils
Kathy Banks, Gebisa Ejeta, Fred Mannering (Purdue University)

Plant-VOC Interaction: Site Investigation and Monitoring for Phytoremediation
Joel Burken (University of Missouri-Rolla)

Microfluidic Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring
Nancy Love, Kathleen Meehan, Brian Love (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)

Table 1. Research Project Summaries

Project Number Project Title Principal Investigators Goal Industrial Collaborator(s) EPA Scientific Advisor
R828770C003 Sustainable Remediation Jodi R. Shann, Steven Rogstad (University of Cincinnati) To determine if natural revegetation and community succession is an effective and sustainable method for stabilization and remediation of contaminated sites. Lucinda Jackson, Chevron Products Company Steven Rock, Remediation and Containment Branch,Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division
R828770C004 Incorporating Natural Attenuation Into Design and Management Strategies for Contaminated Sites John Novak, Mark Widdowson (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) To utilize monitored natural attenuation (MNA) techniques for removal of source material and reduction of risk for contaminated soil and groundwater. Norfolk Southern Corporation and Waste Management, Inc. Fran Kremer,U.S. EPA Facilities
R828770C005 Metals Removal by Constructed Wetlands Mark Fitch, Joel Burken (University of Missouri at Rolla) To evaluate the capacity of constructed wetlands to treat lead mine drainage, including determination of metal geochemistry in the wetland sediments. Doug Bice, Doe Run; Bill Duncan, Cominco Rao Surampalli, U.S. EPA Region 7
R828770C006 Adaptation of Subsurface Microbial Biofilm Communities in Response to Chemical Stressors Paul Bishop, Nancy G. Love, Ann Stevens (University of Cincinnati and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) To effectively restore contaminated subsurface environments by using the structures and functions of microbial biofilm communities to counteract chemical stressors. Rada Krishnan, IT Corporation Gregory Sayles,National Risk Management Research Laboratory
R828770C007 Dewatering, Remediation, and Evaluation of Contaminated Dredged Sediments Paul Schwab, Lee Newman, Krishnakumar Nedunuri, and Kathy Banks (Purdue University, University of South Carolina, and Central State University) To use plant-based technologies to remediate sediments and allow the treated sediments to be used for industrial fill or construction material in the future. David Bowman and Richard Price, U.S. Corps of Engineers Steven Rock Remediation and Containment Branch,Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division
R828770C008 Interaction of Various Plant Species wWith Microbial PCB- Degraders in Contaminated Soils Clayton L. Rugh and Sisir M. Dutta (Michigan State University and Howard University) To bioremediate industrial sites contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using bacterial in-situ methods, such as rhizosphere phytoremediation. Donald K. Russell Ford Motor Company David P. Macarus Regional Science Liaison to ORD Office of Strategic Environmental Analysis U.S. EPA Region 5

Future Activities:

We will use the results of the research projects to contribute to the development of new remediation tools, optimization of existing remediation processes, and increased remediation success stories nationwide.


Journal Articles: 14 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other center views: All 108 publications 22 publications in selected types All 14 journal articles
Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Brauner JS, Widdowson MA, Novak JT, Love NG. Biodegradation of a PAH mixture by native subsurface microbiota. Bioremediation Journal 2002;6(1):9-24. R828770 (2002)
R828770 (2003)
R828770 (Final)
R828770C004 (2003)
  • Full-text: Taylor & Francis-PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: Taylor & Francis-Abstract
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  • Journal Article De S, Perkins M, Dutta SK. Nitrate reductase gene involvement in hexachlorobiphenyl dechlorination by Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Journal of Hazardous Materials 2006;135(1-3):350-354. R828770 (2003)
    R828770 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect-Full Text
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect-Abstract
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  • Other: ScienceDirect-PDF
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  • Journal Article Dutta SK, Adam A, Toure O, Williams AL, Chen YQ. Indigenous mixed soil bacteria in presence of compatible plants are more efficient in PCB degradation. Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 2003;12(3):314-319. R828770 (Final)
    R828770C008 (2003)
  • Full-text: Howard University PDF
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  • Abstract: PSP-PARLAR Abstract
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  • Journal Article Euliss KW, Dorsey BL, Benke KC, Banks MK, Schwab AP. The use of plant tissue silica content for estimating transpiration. Ecological Engineering 2005;25(4):343-348. R828770 (Final)
  • Full-text: Science Direct-Full Text
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  • Abstract: Science Direct-Abstract
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  • Other: Science Direct-PDF
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  • Journal Article Euliss K, Ho C-H, Schwab AP, Rock S, Banks MK. Greenhouse and field assessment of phytoremediation for petroleum contaminants in a riparian zone. Bioresource Technology 2008;99(6):1961-1971. R828770 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Science Direct-Abstract
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  • Other: USDA
  • Journal Article Ho C-H, Banks MK. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the rhizosphere of Festuca arundinacea and associated microbial community changes. Bioremediation Journal 2006;10(3):93-104. R828770 (Final)
  • Abstract: Informa World-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Ho C-H, Applegate B, Banks MK. Impact of microbial/plant interactions on the transformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rhizosphere of Festuca arundinacea. International Journal of Phytoremediation 2007;9(2):107-114. R828770 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Informa World-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Kang D-H, Hong LY, Schwab AP, Banks MK. Removal of Prussian blue from contaminated soil in the rhizosphere of cyanogenic plants. Chemosphere 2007;69(9):1492-1498. R828770 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Science Direct-Full Text
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  • Abstract: Science Direct-Abstract
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  • Other: Science Direct-PDF
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  • Journal Article Robinson SL, Novak JT, Widdowson MA, Crosswell SB, Fetterolf GJ. Field and laboratory evaluation of the impact of tall fescue on polyaromatic hydrocarbon degradation in an aged creosote-contaminated surface soil. Journal of Environmental Engineering-ASCE 2003;129(3):232-240. R828770 (2002)
    R828770 (2003)
    R828770 (Final)
    R828770C004 (2003)
  • Abstract: ASCE-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Smith KE, Schwab AP, Banks MK. Phytoremediation of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediment: a greenhouse feasibility study. Journal of Environmental Quality 2007;36(1):239-244. R828770 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: USDA PDF
  • Abstract: Healthtap - Abstract
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  • Journal Article Song Y, Fitch M, Burken J, Nass L, Chilukiri S, Gale N, Ross C. Lead and zinc removal by laboratory-scale constructed wetlands. Water Environment Research 2001;73(1):37-44. R828770 (2002)
    R828770 (2003)
    R828770 (Final)
    R828770C005 (2002)
    R828770C005 (2003)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Water Environment Federation-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Song Y, Fitch M, Burken J, Ross C. Adsorption of lead and zinc in the substrates of constructed wetlands. Water Environment Research. 2001;73(1):37-44. R828770 (2002)
    R828770C005 (2002)
    R828770C005 (2003)
    not available
    Journal Article Toure O, Chen YQ, Dutta SK. Sinorhizobium meliloti electrotransporant containing ortho-dechlorination gene shows enhanced PCB dechlorination. Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 2003;12(3 Spec Iss):320-322. R828770 (2003)
    R828770 (Final)
    R828770C008 (2003)
  • Abstract: Parlar Scientific Publications-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Zimmerman AR, Kang D-H, Ahn M-Y, Hyun S, Banks MK. Influence of a soil enzyme on iron-cyanide complex speciation and mineral adsorption. Chemosphere 2008;70(6):1044-1051. R828770 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Science Direct-Full Text
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  • Abstract: Science Direct-Abstract
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  • Other: Science Direct-PDF
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  • Supplemental Keywords:

    phytoremediation, remediation, bioremediation, hazardous substance, contaminant, bioavailability, monitored natural attenuation, MNA, groundwater, wetland, dewatering, polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs, U.S. EPA Region 5, U.S. EPA Region 7., RFA, Scientific Discipline, INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION, Waste, Environmental Chemistry, Hazardous Waste, Ecological Risk Assessment, Hazardous, Environmental Engineering, contaminated sediments, hazardous waste treatment, advanced treatment technologies, oil wells, Federal facilities, outreach and training, contaminated soil, groundwater remediation, remediation, automobile manufacturing, contaminated groundwater, technology transfer, mining wastes

    Relevant Websites:

    http://www.mhsrc.org Exit

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2002 Progress Report
  • 2004
  • 2005
  • Final Report
  • Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R828770C001 Technical Outreach Services for Communities
    R828770C002 Technical Outreach Services for Native American Communities
    R828770C003 Sustainable Remediation
    R828770C004 Incorporating Natural Attenuation Into Design and Management Strategies For Contaminated Sites
    R828770C005 Metals Removal by Constructed Wetlands
    R828770C006 Adaptation of Subsurface Microbial Biofilm Communities in Response to Chemical Stressors
    R828770C007 Dewatering, Remediation, and Evaluation of Dredged Sediments
    R828770C008 Interaction of Various Plant Species with Microbial PCB-Degraders in Contaminated Soils
    R828770C009 Microbial Indicators of Bioremediation Potential and Success