Atmospheric Dry Particle Deposition of POPs and Trace Metals in an Urban- and Industrially-Impacted Mid-Atlantic Estuary (AEOLOS B Mid-Atlantic)

EPA Grant Number: R828177
Title: Atmospheric Dry Particle Deposition of POPs and Trace Metals in an Urban- and Industrially-Impacted Mid-Atlantic Estuary (AEOLOS B Mid-Atlantic)
Investigators: Eisenreich, Steven J. , Holsen, Thomas M.
Current Investigators: Totten, Lisa A. , Eisenreich, Steven J. , Holsen, Thomas M.
Institution: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
EPA Project Officer: Shapiro, Paul
Project Period: August 1, 2000 through July 31, 2002 (Extended to July 31, 2004)
Project Amount: $230,000
RFA: Exploratory Research - Engineering, Chemistry, and Physics) (1999) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Water , Land and Waste Management , Air , Engineering and Environmental Chemistry

Description:

Emissions of hazardous air pollutants into the coastal urban-industrial atmosphere increase atmospheric depositional fluxes to proximate water bodies. Dry deposition of large particles containing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and trace metals were a major contributor to deposition within 30-60 km of Chicago and all of Lake Michigan. The lower Hudson River Estuary (HRE) is likely even more heavily impacted by its proximity to the urban-industrial activities of NY and NJ. Estimates of wet and dry deposition of selected POPs as part of a new atmospheric research and monitoring network (NJADN) are not sufficient to support receptor accumulations rates.

Hypothesis:

Dry deposition of large particles containing POPs and trace metals dominate atmospheric deposition to estuaries proximate to urban/industrial centers. Objectives:

(1) To determine the dry depositional flux of coarse and fine particles, selected POPs and trace metals to the lower HRE using surrogate depositional surfaces (renewing water surface sampler and aerodynamic frisbee surface deployed on a modified MIC wet-only sampler); (2) to determine the seasonal particle size distribution of mass, selected POPs and trace metals in the lower HRE; (3) to model the dry particle depositional fluxes of particle mass and targets species to the HRE based on the particle size distribution; (4) to provide a field comparison of the surrogate surface and models to estimate dry particle depositional fluxes; and (5) to provide an assessment of the dry depositional component of the atmospheric deposition of selected POPs and trace metals to the lower HRE.

Approach:

Objective (1) will be accomplished by deploying a novel dry deposition collector based on a renewing water surface and a flat dry surface positioned in the dry cycle of a modified MIC precipitation collector. The latter dry deposition sampler will integrate dry deposition over continuous 9-day periods while the water surface collector will determine dry depositional fluxes during 3 intensive measurement campaigns at two sites in the lower HRE. Objective (2) will be accomplished by determining the particle size distributions of atmospheric particles using MOUDI and NRI collectors (impactors) during the intensive campaigns. Objective (3) will be accomplished by modeling size-dependent deposition velocities from (2) as a function of meteorology from which seasonal fluxes will be derived. Objective (4) will be accomplished by comparing depositional fluxes from surrogate surfaces to modeled fluxes from particle size distributions. Objective (5) will be accomplished by estimating the dry depositional fluxes to the lower HRE and contrasting to wet deposition and gas exchange fluxes of target compounds assessed separately. The organic chemical measurements will be made in four seasons at an urban/industrial and coastal marine site. Target chemicals are PCBs (total PCBs, emphasize ~20 dominant congeners), PAHs (~24 dominant compounds) and trace metals (Mg, Al,, Cr, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb).

Expected Results:

(1) Quantification of dry particle depositional fluxes of selected POPs and trace metals to the lower HRE; (2) detailed assessment and comparison of surrogate surfaces and modeled particle-size dependent depositional fluxes; and (3) contribution of dry particle deposition specifically, and atmospheric deposition in general to chemical inputs and long term recovery of the lower HRE. If successful, the uncertainty in atmospheric and total loading will be dramatically reduced and the limitations to ecosystem recovery on the air side will be elucidated.

Publications and Presentations:

Publications have been submitted on this project: View all 1 publications for this project

Supplemental Keywords:

Mid-Atlantic, EPA Region II, Scientific Discipline, Air, Toxics, Geographic Area, Water, Environmental Chemistry, HAPS, State, Air Deposition, Environmental Monitoring, Mid-Atlantic, Engineering, Chemistry, & Physics, EPA Region, Great Lakes, particle size, particulates, dry deposition studies, receptor accumulation rates, estuaries, PCBs, industrial emissions, Hudson River Estuary, New Jersey (NJ), toxic metals, gaseous organic compound, Lake Michigan, meterology, Region 2, atmospheric deposition, New York (NY), coastal ecosytems

Progress and Final Reports:

  • 2001 Progress Report
  • 2002 Progress Report
  • 2003
  • Final Report