2003 Progress Report: Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center for Remediation of Mine Waste Sites

EPA Grant Number: R829515
Center: HSRC - Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center for Remediation of Mine Waste Sites
Center Director: Shackelford, Charles D.
Title: Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center for Remediation of Mine Waste Sites
Investigators: Shackelford, Charles D.
Institution: Colorado State University , Colorado School of Mines , Montana Tech of the University of Montana
Current Institution: Colorado State University
EPA Project Officer: Lasat, Mitch
Project Period: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2006
Project Period Covered by this Report: October 1, 2002 through September 30, 2003
Project Amount: $5,261,000
RFA: Hazardous Substance Research Centers - HSRC (2001) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Hazardous Waste/Remediation , Land and Waste Management

Objective:

The Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center (HSRC) consists of a consortium of Colorado State University, Colorado School of Mines, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, and several academic and nonacademic participants from other regions of the United States and Canada. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC was established on November 1, 2001, through funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to address issues related to remediation of mine waste sites. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC officially represents U.S. EPA Region 8 states (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming). The activities of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC, however, also pertain to any location within the United States, particularly where remediation of mine waste is required and/or where there is contamination due to metals.

The research goal of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC is to develop new, and to improve existing, methods or technologies for remediation of mine waste sites that are cost effective and that lead to cleanups that are protective of human health and the environment. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC also includes activities pertaining to technology transfer, technical outreach and service to communities (TOSC), and technical assistance for brownfields (TAB). Technology transfer includes such activities as conferences, short courses, workshops, and field demonstrations, with a specific emphasis on the development of new technologies. The TOSC and TAB programs provide educational information to allow communities to make informed decisions concerning environmental contamination, and provide technical assistance to communities and other stakeholders, including the redevelopment of brownfields sites.

Progress Summary:

The consortium member faculty and associated participants for the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC are listed in Table 1. The consortium member faculties collectively represent an integrated research team comprised of 12 departments (biology, chemical engineering, chemistry and geochemistry, civil engineering, earth resources, environmental health, environmental science and engineering, fishery and wildlife biology, geology and geological engineering, microbiology, mining engineering, and rangeland and ecosystem science), and a much broader range of expertise areas. The associated partners for the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC, who also are eligible to participate in research and outreach activities through the Center, consist of members from three of the other four HSRCs (Katherine Banks and Paul Schwab, Midwest HSRC; Danny Reible, South and Southwest HSRC; John Westall, Western HSRC), several other academic institutions spread throughout the United States and one in Canada (David Blowes), four researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey who are involved in mine waste research, and 14 researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These other participants not only strengthen the research capabilities of the Center, but also provide links through which to coordinate research activities with the other HSRCs, academic institutions, and federal agencies.

Table 1. Key Personnel Associated With the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC

Name
Department or Affiliation
Colorado State University  
Brian Bledsoe Civil Engineering
Kenneth Carlson Civil Engineering
William Clements Fishery and Wildlife Biology
Nancy DuTeau Microbiology
Pierre Julien Civil Engineering
Mark Pascke Rangeland Ecosystem Science
Elizabeth Pilon-Smits Biology
Amy Pruden Civil Engineering
Kenneth Reardon Chemical Engineering
Edward Redente Rangeland Ecosystem Science
Charles Shackelford Civil Engineering
Sally Sutton Earth Resources
Chester Watson Civil Engineering
Sandra Woods Civil Engineering
Raymond Yang Environmental Health
Colorado School of Mines  
Dianne Ahmann Environmental Science and Engineering
Ronald Cohen Environmental Science and Engineering
Linda Figueroa Environmental Science and Engineering
Bruce Honeyman Environmental Science and Engineering
Tissa Illangasekare Environmental Science and Engineering
Donald Macalady Chemistry and Geochemistry
Junko Marr Environmental Science and Engineering
Harold Olsen Geology and Geological Engineering
James Ranville Chemistry and Geochemistry
Philippe Ross Environmental Science and Engineering
Robert Siegrist Environmental Science and Engineering
John Spear Environmental Science and Engineering
Thomas Wildeman Chemistry and Geochemistry
Montana Tech  
Karl Burgher Mining Engineering
Kevin Mellott Continuing Education and Extended Studies
Other Participants  
George Aiken U.S. Geological Survey
M. Katherine Banks Purdue University
Craig Benson University of Wisconsin-Madison
David Blowes University of Waterloo (Canada)
John Garbarino U.S. Geological Survey
Jeff Gillow Brookhaven National Laboratory
Karmen King Colorado Mountain College-Leadville
Joseph Meyer University of Wyoming
Danny Reible Louisiana State University
A. Paul Schwab Purdue University
Otto Stein Jr. Montana State University
Katie Walton-Day U.S. Geological Survey
Richard Wanty U.S. Geological Survey
John Westall Oregon State University

Charles Shackelford serves as the Director of the Center and the overall research program. Sandra Woods serves as an Associate Director in charge of training, technology transfer, and community outreach, and Donald Macalady serves as an Associate Director in charge of Quality Assurance/Quality Control for the Center and coordinates the research activities at the Colorado School of Mines. Tom Wildeman serves as a Co-Director for training and technology transfer, and coordinates these activities at the Colorado School of Mines, and Karl Burgher serves as the Director in charge of outreach activities (TOSC and TAB) through a subcontract to Montana Tech. Linda Hinshaw is employed on a half-time basis as an Administrative Assistant to the Director.

Two major advisory groups guide the activities of the Center. The Science Advisory Committee (SAC) has oversight for all Center research activities, including reviewing the progress of existing research projects, as well as reviewing and recommending proposals that have been submitted for new research projects. The Technology Transfer Advisory Committee (TTAC) oversees the Center's training and technology transfer activities as well as the outreach activities. The members of the SAC and TTAC during this past year are listed in Tables 2 and 3, respectively. As indicated in these two tables, the SAC and TTAC members represent the full range of stakeholders in the mine waste remediation arena, including both regional and federal U.S. EPA personnel, other federal agencies with mine waste issues (U.S. Forest Service [USFS], Bureau of Land Management [BLM], U.S. Department of the Interior [DOI]), a regional state environmental agency (Montana Department of Environmental Quality [DEQ]), consulting companies (Knight Piesold, MFG [Shepard Miller], MSE Technology Applications), industry (DuPont and UMETCO), and several academic institutions. In addition, four of the six Region 8 states (Colorado, Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming) are represented through the SAC and TTAC membership. Finally, whereas the Center is linked to three of the four HSRCs through other participants, linkage to the fourth HSRC, the Northeast HSRC, is provided through Kevin Hood, who serves on the TTAC.

Table 2. Science Advisory Committee

Member
Affiliation
Component
Calvin Chien Dupont Industry
Stan Christensen U.S. EPA Region 8 (Superfund) U.S. EPA-Region
James (Tim) Drever University of Wyoming Academic
James (Jim) Dunn U.S. EPA Region 8 (ORD Liaison) U.S. EPA-Region/Federal
Tom Durkin South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Academic
Barb Filas Knight Piesold Consulting
Karl Ford BLM Agency-Federal
Warren McCullough Montana DEQ Agency-State
Don Runnells University of Colorado/MFG (Shepherd Miller) Academic/Consulting
Nancy Rusho U.S. Forest Service, Region 1 Agency-Federal
Curt Sealy UMETCO (Dow Chemical) Industry
Dirk van Zyl University of Nevada-Reno Academic
Roger Wilmoth U.S. EPA, Cincinnati U.S. EPA-Federal

Table 3. Training and Technology Transfer Advisory Committee

Person
Affiliation
Component
MaryAnn Harrington-Baker MSE Technology Applications Consulting
Joe Galetovic U.S. DOI Agency-Federal
Kevin Hood Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments Other HSRC
Glenn Miller University of Nevada-Reno Academic
David Ordway U.S. EPA Region 8 (Brownfields) U.S. EPA-Region
Sonya Pennock U.S. EPA Region 8 (TOSC) U.S. EPA-Region
Carol Russell U.S. EPA Region 8 (Mining Coordinator, Ecosystem Protection and Remediation) U.S. EPA-Region
Kristina Proctor Colorado State University–Pueblo Academic
David Yarlott, Jr Little Big Horn College, Montana Academic/Native American

Director's Report

November 1, 2002–October 31, 2003 represents the second year of Center activity. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC is an extension of the previous HSRC located at Kansas State University that represented U.S. EPA Regions 7 and 8. With the advent of the five new HSRCs in November 2001, U.S. EPA Region 7 now is associated with the Midwest HSRC located at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, and U.S. EPA Region 8 now is represented solely by the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC. As a result, the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC is the only current HSRC that is affiliated with only one U.S. EPA Region, whereas the other four HSRCs represent either two or three U.S. EPA Regions. Although this distinction allows the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC to focus on the primary environmental issues of U.S. EPA Region 8 (environmental impacts resulting from mining activities and abandoned mine lands), the allocation of funds in proportion to U.S. EPA Region representation has ramifications with respect to the number of activities that can be undertaken through the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC.

The Center funded six research projects during the second year. The first four projects (Projects 1-4) were initiated the in first year and continued through the second year. Each of these projects was a 2-year project and, therefore, terminated at the end of the second year (i.e., October 31, 2003). In addition to these four projects, two new projects (Projects 5 and 6) were funded beginning the second year (i.e., November 1, 2002) in response to the call for proposals released on April 9, 2002. The scheduled termination of Projects 1-4 freed up funding for new projects that would start in the third year (i.e., November 1, 2003). As a result, a request for proposals for the 2003-2004 funding cycle was released on February 10, 2003, and 15 proposals were received by the deadline of March 31, 2003. These proposals were sent to the SAC for review prior to the Center’s second meeting on May 19-20, 2003, and were evaluated and ranked by the SAC members on May 20, 2003. Based on the ranking of the proposals, and the available budget, five new projects are being funded during the third year. Therefore, a total of seven research projects will be funded during the third year of the Center (see Table 4).

Highlights of Year 2 of the Project

In addition to the research and outreach activities conducted through the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC, the second-year activities of the Center involved significant efforts to increase the exposure to and networking with as many of the stakeholders as possible. For example, oral presentations about the Center were given by the Center Director at two major mining conferences: (1) the Joint Conference of the 9th Billings Land Reclamation Symposium and the 20th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation, Billings, MT, June 3-6, 2003; and (2) the Workshop on Mining Impacted Native American Lands, Reno, NV, September 9-11, 2003.

Other Center personnel made presentations on behalf of the Center, including Dr. Craig Benson (Project 5 Co-Principal Investigator [Co-PI]) at the Mine, Design, Operations and Closure Conference held in Polson, MT, on April 27-30, 2003; and Dr. Linda Figueroa (Project 3 Principal Investigator [PI]) at the Green Brownfields II Conference held in Dresden, Germany, on June 14-19, 2003. Finally, both the 2003 Mine Design, Operations and Closure Conference and the Tailings and Mine Waste 2003 Conference were co-sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC. For the first time in its 10-year history, the Tailings and Mine Waste Conference was held outside the campus of Colorado State University in Vail, CO, on October 12-15, and was such a rousing success that plans already are underway to hold the conference next year at the same time of the year and at the same location and venue.

The Center Director, Charles Shackelford, also participated in the annual HSRC Director's meeting held on August 26-27, 2003, in Cincinnati, OH. Two presentations on Center research were given at this meeting. First, Charles Shackelford, Co-PI of Center Project 5, gave an overview of the research to be conducted on this project. Second, Dr. Pierre Julien, PI of Center Project 2, presented the results of the first approximately 1.5 years of effort on his Center-sponsored research project.

Another highlight of 2003 was the Center’s second annual meeting held on May 19-20 at the Colorado School of Mines, with Center Associate Director Don Macalady serving as organizer and host for the meeting. This meeting is one of the two semi-annual meetings required by the U.S. EPA for the Center, and consisted of oral presentations, poster presentations, social events, and formal meetings of the SAC and TTAC. The oral presentations were moderated by the Center Director, and consisted of presentations by each of the six PIs for the second-year research projects, as well as a presentation by Karl Burgher, Director of TAB and TOSC, on the outreach activities being conducted on behalf of the Center at Montana Tech of the University of Montana.

Table 4. Students, Post-Docs, and Visiting Scholars Involved in Center Research

Project
Name
Institution*
Degree Expected Graduation
1
Patsy Buckley
CSM
Ph.D. Summer 2005
 
Aaron Redman
CSM
Ph.D. Fall 2005
 
Kaylene Ritter
CSM
Ph.D. Summer 2005
2
Mark Velleux
CSU
Ph.D. Summer 2005
 
Rosalia Rojas
CSU
Post-Doc NA
3
Sriram Ananthanarayan
CSU
M.S. Spring 2003
 
Paulo Hemsi
CSU
Ph.D. Spring 2004
 
Hyun Hong
CSU
M.S. Spring 2004
 
Stephanie Kozera
CSM
Visiting Scholar NA
 
Sara LoVetere
CSM
M.S. Spring 2005
 
Miranda Logan
CSM
M.S. Summer 2003
 
Nicole Messner
CSU
B.S. Spring 2004
 
Pascale Pedron
CSM
Visiting Scholar NA
 
Luciana Pererya
CSU
Visiting Researcher NA
 
Marie-Helene Robustelli
CSM
Visiting Scholar NA
 
Carme Sans
CSU
Visiting Professor NA
 
Jason Seyler
CSM
M.S. Summer 2003
 
Julia Ventker
CSM
M.S. Fall 2003
 
Hulya Yavuz
CSM
Visiting Scholar NA
 
Tiffany Yesavage
CSM
Ph.D. Spring 2007
4
Jeff Clark
CSU
M.S. Summer 2004
 
Bryn Johnson
CSU
B.S. Fall 2005
 
Donna Kashian
CSU
Post-Doc NA
 
Katharine Mitchell
CSU
B.S. Spring 2003
 
Joe Nicholson
CSU
B.S. Fall 2003
5
Preecha Apiwantragoon
UWM
Ph.D. Spring 2005
 
Gretchen Bohnhoff
UWM
M.S. Fall 2004
 
Aaron Ogorzalek
CSU
M.S. Spring 2005
6
Angelique Diaz
CSM
Ph.D. Spring 2006
 
Jeff Gillow
CSM
Ph.D. Fall 2004
*CSM = Colorado School of Mines; CSU = Colorado State University; UWM = University
of Wisconsin-Madison

The audience consisted of Center administrative personnel, members and participants of the Center, SAC and TTAC members, and students involved in Center research. The students were required to generate posters on their research for display and presentation during lunch on the first day. The SAC then used the oral presentations, poster presentations, and progress reports (generated by the PIs and distributed to SAC members prior to the meeting) as a basis for evaluating the progress of the existing projects on May 20, 2003. The outcome of this evaluation by the SAC was that all projects were making satisfactory progress. In addition, the SAC also evaluated 15 proposals submitted in response to a Request For Proposal, and recommended that 5 of these 15 proposals be funded beginning the third year.

In addition to the semi-annual Center meetings required by the U.S. EPA, the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC also organizes internal Center meetings that rotate among Colorado State University, Colorado School of Mines, and U.S. EPA Region 8 Headquarters in Denver. The purpose of these internal meetings is to maintain communication among all interested parties. The meetings generally last about 90 minutes and consist of about 30 minutes for Center news and announcements, followed by a 1-hour seminar given by a PI of one of the funded research projects. For the second year of Center activities, the only internal meeting was held at Colorado State University on March 19, 2003. This meeting included a seminar by Dr. Linda Figueroa, PI for Project 3 of the Center. Only one internal meeting was held during the second year of Center activities because one meeting was conducted late in the first year (i.e., November 8, 2002), and another internal meeting is scheduled for early in the third year (i.e., December 10, 2003). These meetings will be continued throughout the duration of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC at a frequency of about one to three per year.

A list of the research projects at the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC for the second year of Center activity is provided in Table 5. There are separate reports that describe the progress for each of these research projects. However, the entire list of publications for the Center is presented in this report rather than in the separate project reports.

Table 5. Research Program Summary for Projects in Effect During 2003

Project
Project Title
PrincipalInvestigators*
EndDate
1
Redox Transformations, Complexation and Soil/Sediment Interactions of Inorganic Forms of As and Se in Aquatic Environments: Effects of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Donald Macalady (CSM)
Dianne Ahmann (CSM)
John Westall (OSU)
John Garbarino (USGS)
2003
2
Fate and Transport of Metals and Sediment in Surface Water Pierre Julien (CSU)
Brian Bledsoe (CSU)
Chester Watson (CSU)
Otto Stein (MSU)
2003
3
Metal Removal Capabilities of Passive Bioreactor Systems: Effects of Organic Matter and Microbial Population Dynamics Linda Figueroa (CSM)
Dianne Ahmann (CSM)
David Blowes (UWA)
Kenneth Carlson (CSU)
Nancy DuTeau (CSU)
Kenneth Reardon (CSU)
Charles Shackelford (CSU)
Thomas Wildeman (CSM)
Sandra Woods (CSU)
2003
4
Evaluating Recovery of Stream Ecosystems From Mining Pollution: Integrating Biochemical, Population, Community and Ecosystem Indicators William Clements (CSU)
James Ranville (CSM)
2003
5
Evaluation of Hydrologic Models for Alternative Covers at Mine Waste Sites Charles Shackelford (CSU)
Craig Benson (UWM)
2005
6
Microbial Reduction of Uranium in Mine Leachate by Fermentative and Iron Reducing Bacteria Bruce Honeyman (CSM)
John Spear (CSM)
2004
*CSM = Colorado School of Mines; CSU = Colorado State University; MSU = Montana State University; OSU = Oregon State University; USGS = U.S. Geological Survey; UWA = University of Waterloo (Canada); UWM = University of Wisconsin-Madison

Future Activities:

The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC consortium will continue to develop and improve methods and technologies for remediation of mine waste sites that are cost effective and that lead to cleanups that are protective of human health and the environment. The Center will be funding seven projects in the next year as well as continue to support technology transfer, TOSC, and TAB efforts.


Journal Articles: 16 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other center views: All 181 publications 16 publications in selected types All 16 journal articles
Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Bednar AJ, Garbarino JR, Ranville JF, Wildeman TR. Effects of iron on arsenic speciation and redox chemistry in acid mine water. Journal of Geochemical Exploration 2005;85(2):55-62. R829515 (2005)
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  • Journal Article Clark JL, Clements WH. The use of in situ and stream microcosm experiments to assess population- and community-level responses to metals. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2006;25(9):2306-2312. R829515 (2005)
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  • Journal Article Clements WH. Small-scale experiments support causal relationships between metal contamination and macroinvertebrate community responses. Ecological Applications 2004;14(3):954-967. R829515 (2003)
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  • Journal Article Hemsi PS, Shackelford CD, Figueroa LA. Modeling the influence of decomposing organic solids on sulfate reduction rates for iron precipitation. Environmental Science & Technology 2005;39(9):3215-3225. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Hemsi PS, Shackelford CD. An evaluation of the influence of aquifer heterogeneity on permeable reactive barrier design. Water Resources Research 2006;42(3):W03402, doi:10.1029/2005WR004629. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Hong H, Pruden A, Reardon KF. Comparison of CE-SSCP and DGGE for monitoring a complex microbial community remediating mine drainage. Journal of Microbiological Methods 2007;69(1):52-64. R829515 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Kashian DR, Prusha BA, Clements WH. Influence of total organic carbon and UV-B radiation on zinc toxicity and bioaccumulation in aquatic communities. Environmental Science & Technology 2004;38(23):6371-6376. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Logan MV, Reardon KF, Figueroa LA, McLain JET, Ahmann DM. Microbial community activities during establishment, performance, and decline of bench-scale passive treatment systems for mine drainage. Water Research 2005;39(18):4537-4551. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Paschke MW, Valdecantos A, Redente EF. Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration grass species. Environmental Pollution 2005;135(2):313-322. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Paschke MW, Perry LG, Redente EF. Zinc toxicity thresholds for reclamation forb species. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution 2006;170(1-4):317-330. R829515 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Pruden A, Messner N, Pereyra L, Hanson RE, Hiibel SR, Reardon KF. The effect of inoculum on the performance of sulfate-reducing columns treating heavy metal contaminated water. Water Research 2007;41(4):904-914. R829515 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Prusha BA, Clements WH. Landscape attributes, dissolved organic C, and metal bioaccumulation in aquatic macroinvertebrates (Arkansas River Basin, Colorado). Journal of the North American Benthological Society 2004;23(2):327-339. R829515 (2003)
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  • Journal Article Redman AD, Macalady DL, Ahmann D. Natural organic matter affects arsenic speciation and sorption onto hematite. Environmental Science & Technology 2002;36(13):2889-2896. R829515 (2002)
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  • Journal Article Ritter K, Aiken GR, Ranville JF, Bauer M, Macalady DL. Evidence for the aquatic binding of arsenate by natural organic matter--suspended Fe(III). Environmental Science & Technology 2006;40(17):5380-5387. R829515 (2005)
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  • Journal Article Rojas R, Velleux M, Julien P, Johnson B. Grid scale effects on watershed soil erosion models. Journal of Hydrologic Engineering 2008;13(9):793-802. R829515 (2003)
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  • Journal Article Velleux ML, Julien PY, Rojas-Sanchez R, Clements WH, England Jr JF. Simulation of metals transport and toxicity at a mine-impacted watershed: California Gulch, Colorado. Environmental Science & Technology 2006;40(22):6996-7004. R829515 (Final)
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  • Supplemental Keywords:

    Technical Outreach and Service to Communities, TOSC, Technical Assistance to Brownfields, TAB, groundwater, sediments, environmental chemistry, mining, geochemistry, toxicology, remediation, metal mobility, subsurface, microbiology, industry sectors, waste, water, contaminated sediments, ecological risk assessment, ecology, ecosystems, environmental engineering, geology, hazardous, hazardous waste, mining-NAIC 21, remediation, selenium, acid mine drainage, acid mine runoff, aquatic ecosystems, arsenic, contaminant transport, contaminated marine sediment, contaminated waste sites, field monitoring, groundwater, heavy metals, mining impacted runoff, sediment transport, stream ecosystems, suspended sediment,, RFA, Scientific Discipline, Toxics, Waste, Ecosystem Protection/Environmental Exposure & Risk, Hydrology, National Recommended Water Quality, Bioavailability, Remediation, Contaminant Candidate List, Monitoring/Modeling, Fate & Transport, Hazardous Waste, Environmental Engineering, Geology, Hazardous, fate and transport, risk assessment, contaminated sediments, mathematical model, fate and transport , contaminant transport, lead, acid mine drainage, contaminated sediment, mine tailings, cleanup, sediment transport, modeling, surface water, contaminated soil, total maximum daily loads, manganese, Zinc, Selenium, toxicity, mining, copper, environmental toxicant, risk assessments, cadmium, arsenic, metals, microbial populations, contaminant transport models

    Relevant Websites:

    http://www.engr.colostate.edu/hsrc/ exit EPA
    http://www.toscprogram.org/tosc-programs.html exit EPA

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2002 Progress Report
  • 2004 Progress Report
  • 2005 Progress Report
  • Final Report
  • Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R829515C001 Redox Transformations, Complexation and Soil/Sediment Interactions of Inorganic Forms of As and Se in Aquatic Environments: Effects of Natural Organic Matter
    R829515C002 Fate and Transport of Metals and Sediment in Surface Water
    R829515C003 Metal Removal Capabilities of Passive Bioreactor Systems: Effects of Organic Matter and Microbial Population Dynamics
    R829515C004 Evaluating Recovery of Stream Ecosystems from Mining Pollution: Integrating Biochemical, Population, Community and Ecosystem Indicators
    R829515C005 Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center Training and Technology Transfer Program
    R829515C006 Technical Outreach Services for Communities and Technical Assistance to Brownfields
    R829515C007 Evaluation of Hydrologic Models for Alternative Covers at Mine Waste Sites
    R829515C008 Microbial Reduction of Uranium in Mine Leachate by Fermentative and Iron-Reducing Bacteria
    R829515C009 Development and Characterization of Microbial Inocula for High-Performance Passive Treatment of Acid Mine Drainage
    R829515C010 Reactive Transport Modeling of Metal Removal From Anaerobic Biozones
    R829515C011 Assessment of Electrokinetic Injection of Amendments for Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage
    R829515C012 Metal Toxicity Thresholds for Important Reclamation Plant Species of the Rocky Mountains
    R829515C013 An Improved Method for Establishing Water Quality Criteria for Mining Impacted Streams