2002 Progress Report: Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center for Remediation of Mine Waste Sites

EPA Grant Number: R829515
Center: HSRC - Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center for Remediation of Mine Waste Sites
Center Director: Shackelford, Charles D.
Title: Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center for Remediation of Mine Waste Sites
Investigators: Shackelford, Charles D. , Burger, Karl , Hinshaw, Linda , Macalady, Donald L. , Wildeman, Thomas , Woods, Sandra L.
Current Investigators: Shackelford, Charles D.
Institution: Colorado State University , Colorado School of Mines , Montana Tech of the University of Montana
Current Institution: Colorado State University
EPA Project Officer: Lasat, Mitch
Project Period: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2006
Project Period Covered by this Report: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2002
Project Amount: $5,261,000
RFA: Hazardous Substance Research Centers - HSRC (2001) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Hazardous Waste/Remediation , Land and Waste Management

Objective:

The overall objective of this research project is to develop new, and improve existing, methods or technologies for remediation of mine waste sites that are cost effective and lead to cleanups that are protective of human health and the environment. The Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center (HSRC) also includes activities pertaining to technology transfer, technical outreach and service to communities (TOSC), and technical assistance for brownfields (TAB). Technology transfer includes activities such as conferences, short courses, workshops, and field demonstrations, with a specific emphasis on the development of new technologies. The TOSC and TAB programs provide educational information to allow communities to make informed decisions concerning environmental contamination, and provide technical assistance to communities and other stakeholders involved in the redeveloping of brownfields sites. Another important goal of the Center is the education of students interested in careers directed toward finding solutions to environmental problems, particularly mine waste problems.

The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC consists of a consortium of Colorado State University, Colorado School of Mines, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, and several academic and non-academic participants from other regions of the United States and Canada. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC was established on November 1, 2001, through funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to address issues related to remediation of mine waste sites. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC officially represents EPA Region 8 states (CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, and WY); however, the activities of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC also pertain to any location within the United States, particularly where the remediation of mine waste is required and/or where there is contamination because of metals.

The Rocky Mountain Region HSRC consortium member faculty collectively represents an integrated research team, which covers a broad range of expertise areas. The associated partners for the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC, who also are eligible to participate in research and outreach activities through the Center, consist of members from three of the other four HSRCs (Katherine Banks and Paul Schwab, Midwest HSRC; Danny Reible, South/Southwest HSRC; John Westall, Western HSRC), several other academic institutions spread throughout the United States and one in Canada (David Blowes), and three researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey involved in mine waste research. These other participants not only strengthen the research capabilities of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC, but also provide links through which to coordinate research activities with other HSRCs, academic institutions, and federal agencies.

Two major advisory groups guide the activities of the Center. The Science Advisory Committee (SAC) oversees all Center research activities, which include reviewing the progress of existing research projects, and reviewing and recommending proposals for new research projects. The Technology Transfer Advisory Committee (TTAC) oversees the Center's training and technology transfer activities and outreach activities. The SAC and TTAC members represent the full range of stakeholders in the mine waste remediation arena, including both regional and federal EPA personnel, other federal agencies with mine waste issues (U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior), a state environmental agency (Montana Department of Environmental Quality), consulting companies (Knight Piesold, MFG [Shepard Miller], MSE Technology Applications), industry (DuPont and UMETCO), and several academic institutions. In addition, four of the six EPA Region 8 states (CO, MT, SD, and WY) are represented through the SAC and TTAC membership. Finally, although the Center is linked to three of the four HSRCs through other participants, linkage to the fourth HSRC, the Northeast HSRC, is provided through Kevin Hood who serves on the TTAC.

Progress Summary:

Project year 2002 (November 1, 2001-October 31, 2002) represents the first year of Center activity. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC's primary focus is on environmental issues of EPA Region 8, specifically the environmental impacts resulting from mining activities and abandoned mine lands.

In addition to the research and outreach activities conducted through the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC, much of the first year of the Center was devoted to announcing and advertising the awarding of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC to Colorado State University and the Colorado School of Mines, as well as networking with as many stakeholders as possible. One of the highlights of this effort was an interview with Center Director, Charles Shackelford, conducted by Colorado Public Radio in January 2002.

In January 2002, a special session about the Center served as the kickoff for the 9th Annual International Tailings and Mine Waste Conference held at Colorado State University. This session, organized and moderated by Center Director Charles Shakelford, consisted of six presentations by Tom Wildeman, who serves as Co-Director for Training and Technology Transfer. Papers on these presentations were included in the conference proceedings. Oral presentations about the Center also were given by the Center Director at two major mining conferences: the 2002 Mine Design, Operations, and Closure Conference held April 22-25, 2002, in Polson, MT; and the Hardrock Mining 2002: Issues Shaping the Industry Conference, held May 7-9, 2002 in Denver, CO. The Tailings and Mine Waste 2002 and the 2002 Mine Design, Operations, and Closure Conference were co-sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC.

Another highlight of 2002, was the Center's Kickoff Meeting held July 31-August 1, 2002, at Colorado State University. This meeting is one of two semi-annual meetings required by the EPA for the Center, and consisted of oral presentations, poster presentations, social events, and formal meetings of the SAC and TTAC. The oral presentations were moderated by the Center Director, and consisted of presentations by Mitch Lasat, EPA Program Manager for the HSRC Program; Carol Russell, Mining Coordinator for EPA Region 8; and each of the four PIs for the first year research projects. The audience consisted of Center administrative personnel, members and participants of the Center, SAC and TTAC members, and students who are involved in Center research. The students were required to generate posters on their research for display and presentation during lunch on the first day. The SAC then used the oral presentations, poster presentations, and progress reports generated by the project investigators and distributed them to SAC members prior to the meeting, as a basis for evaluating the progress of the existing projects on August 1, 2002. The outcome of this evaluation by the SAC was that all projects were making satisfactory progress. In addition, the SAC also evaluated nine proposals submitted in response to an RFP, and recommended that two of these nine proposals be funded in Year 2.

In addition to the semi-annual Center meetings required by the EPA, the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC also organizes internal Center meetings that rotate among Colorado State University, Colorado School of Mines, and EPA Region 8 Headquarters in Denver, CO. The purpose of these internal meetings is to maintain communication among all interested parties. The meetings generally last about 90 minutes and consist of about 30 minutes for Center news and announcements, followed by a 1-hour seminar given by a principal investigator (PI) of one of the funded research projects. The first of these internal Center meetings was held at the Colorado School of Mines on Thursday, January 17, 2002, and included a research seminar by Pierre Julien, PI for Project 2 of the Center. The second of these meetings was held at Colorado State University on Thursday, March 7, 2002, and included presentations by Karl Burgher on outreach activities and by Don Macalady, PI for Project 1 of the Center. The third meeting was held at EPA Region 8 Headquarters on Friday, November 8, 2002, and included a research seminar by Will Clements, PI for Project 4 of the Center. These meetings will be continued throughout the duration of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC at a frequency of about three per year.

The Center Director also participated in three activities relevant to the Center during October 2002. First, the Center Director and Associate Director, Don Macalady, attended the periodic meeting of the Leadville Institute of Science and Technology (LIST) in Golden, CO, on October 1, 2002. The primary purpose of LIST is to promote job activities related to mining issues in Leadville, CO. On October 9, 2002, the Center Director presented an overview of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC via a PowerPoint presentation to a nation-wide audience of more than 20 EPA personnel via a conference call. PowerPoint presentations on related research activities at two EPA research labs (the National Risk Management Research Laboratory, and the National Exposure Research Laboratory) also were given. Finally, both the Center Director and Associate Director attended the technology review meeting for EPA's Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) held at MSE in Butte, MT, on October 22, 2002. The primary objective was to become familiar with this related program, with the goal of facilitating communication and cooperation, and minimizing duplication of effort.

The Center funded four research projects during Year 1. Each of the four Year 1 projects are 2-year projects. The objectives of these projects are summarized below.

Redox Transformations, Complexation, and Soil/Sediment Interactions of Inorganic Forms of As and Se in Aquatic Environments: Effects of Natural Organic Matter (NOM)

The objectives of this research project are to: (1) characterize water samples and their associated NOM from sites within and beyond EPA Region 8 for pH, alkalinity, conductivity, metals content, anion character and quantity, total organic and inorganic carbon, elemental composition, acidity, aromatic content, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum, and average molecular weight of NOM; (2) determine the ability of each NOM sample to form aqueous complexes with As and Se; (3) determine the ability of each NOM sample to compete with As and Se for sorption onto hematite and gibbsite, and to estimate the extent to which each NOM sample accelerates redox transformations of As and Se; (4) quantify the abilities of selected NOM samples to accelerate redox transformations as a function of sample history and presence or absence of microorganisms and external electron donors and acceptors; (5) codify observed relationships among NOM characteristics, aqueous geochemistry, and influences on complexation, sorption, and redox reactions of As and Se to correlate measurable NOM properties with the magnitudes of the observed effects using techniques such as ANOVA and principle component analysis; (6) investigate the influences of selected samples of NOM on As and Se bioavailability and toxicity in the light of known influences of NOM samples on As and Se complexation, adsorption, and redox behavior; and (7) formulate a conceptual model describing the interactions between NOM, As, and Se that are pertinent for remediation design, and to test this model with experiments from field sites for which predictions of As and/or Se behavior can be formulated and tested based on the site properties and the conceptual model.

Fate and Transport of Metals and Sediment in Surface Water

This research project focuses on surface water and sediment transport, with an emphasis on the fate and transport of metals in rivers from mining waste sites. The specific objectives of this 2-year project are to: (1) develop a methodology for evaluating impacts from sediment and metals on watersheds; and (2) improve and develop computer modeling tools for the simulation of erosion and sedimentation and metals in surface waters. The overall objective of our research is to improve our mechanistic understanding of the interaction between heavy metals and fine sediment.

Metal Removal Capabilities of Passive Bioreactor Systems: Effects of Organic Matter and Microbial Population Dynamics

The overall objective of this research project is to evaluate the effect of organic matter characteristic and types on organic products produced by the microbial populations, microbial population distributions, and metal speciation and complexation. Our research plan is to: (1) evaluate the physical, chemical, and biological composition of the components used to create the passive bioreactor (PBR) mixtures; (2) determine if the organic substrate characteristics affect the character and concentration of soluble organic matter and metal speciation and concentration; (3) determine the variation of microbial population with time and location; and (4) evaluate the use of mathematical models to relate metal removal and transport to various system parameters.

The approach will utilize experimental study in batch and column systems to test the proposed hypotheses and meet the project objectives. The project tasks include: (1) solid-phase organic and inorganic material characterization (physical, chemical, and microbial); (2) batch studies on the effect of different PBR mixtures; (3) column studies on the effect of substrate mixtures and perturbations; and (4) fate and transport modeling.

Evaluating Recovery of Stream Ecosystems From Mining Pollution: Integrating Biochemical, Population, Community, and Ecosystem Indicators

The objective of this research project is to: (1) evaluate indicators of recovery in a metal polluted stream (the Arkansas River) following remediation and improvements in water quality; (2) assess the influence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on metal bioavailability and toxicity; and (3) investigate potential interactions between heavy metals and other anthropogenic stressors.

Training and Technology Transfer

From the inception of the Center in November 2001, focus has been placed on abandoned mine lands (AML). This focus makes our primary customers the federal and state agencies that deal with AMLs. Consequently, technology transfer has focused on these agencies before reaching out to industries or other public agencies that deal with active mining operations.

A number of factors make the choice of concentrating on AMLs the place to start. First, the Superfund sites in the United States that contain mining sites all contain AMLs. Also, because all technologies that are developed for AMLs would have to be low cost, low maintenance solutions, these technologies also would naturally be attractive to other parties. Finally, one of the problems with developing innovative treatment technologies is convincing regulators to accept the risk of trying such solutions. Therefore, if this Center can work with state and public agencies in developing such technologies, then regulatory acceptance in other situations will be more straightforward.

The goal of technology transfer within the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC is to take the research results gained within our Center, bundle them with related technologies developed in other research settings, and disseminate the results and develop these technologies from the demonstration phase to full-scale operations. For some of the other HSRCs working on organic contaminants in water and soil, this goal has been achieved and has helped these Centers to gain some self-sufficiency.

The working objectives of technology transfer contain activities for laying the foundation for technology development. These objectives are to: (1) contact the primary agencies that have to deal with AMLs, including the EPA, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, and the Office of Surface Mining, determine their primary technical needs for dealing with these sites, and make certain that these needs are included in the yearly request for proposals; (2) contact committees and societies whose activities are closely related to those of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC, including the American Society of Mining Reclamation (ASMR), the Acid Drainage Technology Institute (ADTI) metals mining group, the National Association of Abandoned Mine Land Programs, the Environmental Division of the Society of Mining Engineers, and MSE Technology Applications, and explain to them the activities of our Center for the purpose of finding out how we can cooperate and provide assistance; (3) find public and private organizations with which we can bundle results and find joint ways to present and promote our technologies; and (4) find situations where we can implement the demonstration phase either with our own results or with related technologies that have been developed by other organizations.

The approach for meeting these objectives requires informing individuals within agencies, committees, and societies of the activities of Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC. If the person falls in the customer category, we find out what they consider to be the primary technical needs for remediating AML Sites. If the person represents an organization with which we should cooperate, we determine how that cooperation could be achieved. If the person represents an organization that is developing related technologies, then we determine how we can help bundle our technical expertise with theirs so that it stands a better chance of being taken to the demonstration stage.

As this information is accumulated, individuals and organizations are recruited to combine with our Center to plan and carry out presentations and workshops for societies and agencies in the hope that situations can be found for demonstration programs. This approach clearly involves making considerable contacts, preferably in the form of personal visits. However, the technology transfer budget does contain a considerable travel allotment for trips to meetings. Fortunately, many of the individuals to be contacted are in the Denver area.

TOSC. The TOSC Program was created in 1994, to provide technical assistance to communities impacted by hazardous wastes. This program is invaluable to communities facing hazardous substance management issues that may threaten their health or the environment. By using the educational resources of the participating universities, citizens gain a better understanding of the problem, allowing them to make informed decisions and participate more fully in activities that affect their communities. This technical assistance is provided to communities free-of-charge and is based on the following principle: a partnership between a community and the TOSC is "two-way." The TOSC will contribute valuable, independent, and necessary information and expertise to assist the community in addressing hazardous waste problems. The community will contribute knowledge, expertise, and time.

· A TOSC/community partnership reflects a commitment to fostering and sustaining a relationship for the time period required for meeting the needs of the community.

· A TOSC/community partnership is an opportunity for the TOSC to learn how to improve its technical assistance outreach.

· TOSC/community partnerships are characterized by the principles of trust, neutrality, and flexibility.

The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC TOSC program objectives are to: (1) create technical assistance materials tailored to the identified needs of a community; (2) inform community members about existing technical assistance materials, such as publications, videos, and Web sites; (3) provide technical information to help community members become active participants in cleanup and environmental development activities; (4) provide independent and credible technical assistance to communities affected by hazardous substance problems; (5) review and interpreting technical documents and other materials for affected communities; and (6) sponsor workshops, short courses, and other learning experiences to explain basic science and environmental policy related to hazardous substances.

There are many activities that can be conducted to assist communities including:

· Conducting technical presentations and seminars

· Performing technical document reviews

· Providing literature related to treatment technologies

· Conducting workshops related to risk

· Providing assistance with redevelopment projects (such as field demonstrations)

· Participating in public meetings

· Assisting the community group in developing its capacity to monitor sites, such as determining access to monitoring data

· Providing information on health and environmental risk of applicable contaminants.

The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC provides assistance, as needed, related to scientific and engineering issues, policy, and human and ecological health. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC also provides assistance to communities that must deal with all types of contaminated sites. In addition, the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC provides information and assistance to other HSRC's that may be dealing with issues concerning mining wastes and acid mine drainage upon request by the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC.

Status of TOSC Sites. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC TOSC Program has been active at the Pueblo, CO, site since August 2002. We have spent time in the community meeting with the various stakeholders and evaluating the technical issues associated with this site. We currently are developing fact sheets. The Pueblo Community is concerned about air quality, site cleanup, and CO, NOx, PM10, SO2, VOC, and Pb.

The TOSC Program has been in contact with Joan Mitchell of Rocky Boy Indian Reservation, MT, Environmental Programs. We have no pending requests for assistance from the TOSC Program at this time. Rocky Boy Indian Reservation has a history of water quality issues, Superfund cleanup issues, underground storage tank (UST) issues, redevelopment issues, illegal dumping issues, and pollution prevention issues.

The Corps has been working on the Blackhills Army Depot, SD, site for many years and expects to be there an additional 10 years, given budget cuts and the slow cleanup process. The community has not been very active over the last 2 years. There are a number of environmental cleanup issues at this site. Black Hills Army Depot was used for the manufacturing, storing, and destroying of weaponry. The areas of concern include chromium-contaminated soil, groundwater issues, and contaminant transfer.

Technical Assistance to Brownfields (TAB). Brownfields cleanup is one of President Bush's and EPA Administrator Christine Todd Whitman's priority issues. In his 2002 budget, President Bush proposed increasing brownfields funding to $97.7 million for the EPA. Brownfields are defined by the EPA as "abandoned, idled, or underused industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination." These brownfields sites often are targets for cleanup and redevelopment because they typically have low to medium levels of environmental contamination (as opposed to Superfund sites, which may have very high concentrations of a wide variety of contaminants). Redevelopment of brownfields properties also has emerged as a top priority for local governments, environmentalists, industries, and other stakeholders. The brownfields boom is fueled by prospects of urban renewal, job creation, profits, and environmental improvement. Indeed, the growing number of brownfields success stories testifies to the potential of putting America's lands back to productive, sustainable use. However, to succeed in brownfields, a local community must juggle a complex set of factors, such as funding and financing schemes, cleanup tools and technologies, multiple levels of regulation, issues of legal liability, risk assessment, real estate, and public participation. Success in brownfields is no easy task, despite the abundance of information on the issue.

The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC TAB Program is directed by Karl Burgher at Montana Tech and it addresses brownfields sites throughout EPA Region 8. The objective of the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC TAB Program is to provide technical assistance to meet the needs and desires of the community or group seeking assistance.

Activities to provide technical assistance can take many forms, including leadership training, risk assessment, training for brownfields processes and site assessment, and technical information on cleanup alternatives. Leadership training for community leaders focuses on the technical side of cleanup activities, interaction with government agencies, environmental regulations, cleanup technologies, and risk assessment. Risk assessment training is provided for local government planners, developers, and community members to help build knowledge of basic mechanisms and protocols of risk assessment. Topics include site inventory, characterization, end use, and environmental quality requirements as part of the measurement of risk. Training covering the technical aspects of the brownfields redevelopment process is provided to a variety of stakeholders. Specific subject matter is tailored to local requirements and interests. Training on the assessment of hazardous waste sites helps community leaders and local government environmental professionals develop a better understanding of site assessment principles. Sessions focus on integration of assessment with land use decisions and provide information about the acceptable tools for data collection. Local government officials, developers, and environmental/planning professionals are provided with the technical information needed and are taught how to make decisions on the use of appropriate technology for sustainable land use.

The TAB Program differs from the TOSC, but should incorporate similar principles of involving stakeholders, meeting stakeholder needs, building trust, creating teams of individuals with a wide range of expertise, and continuous improvement. Therefore, our approach includes the following:

· Because TAB projects involve a wide range of contaminants and issues, the Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC will assemble an interdisciplinary group of faculty and staff to work with projects. The group of faculty and staff will vary with project needs.

· In addition to identifying appropriate faculty and TAB staff, stakeholders with a wide variety of opinions must be consulted.

· The TAB Program will work with the group requesting assistance to develop an initial agreement that establishes community needs and describes outcomes.

· Evaluation of TAB projects will be ongoing. The initial agreement will identify mechanisms for formal evaluations.

The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC is assisting EPA Region 8 brownfields in many ways, such as through the development of print-based materials (creation of handbooks or compilation and review of literature); through face-to-face meetings, conferences, seminars, and workshops; or through use of technologies (such as the Internet, including development of Web sites, Internet-based instruction, Internet conferencing, or electronic newsletters). Each of these methods will be used, as appropriate, to help communities better understand technical issues and support redevelopment of brownfields.

There are many benefits to this project. The project will provide assistance to a variety of stakeholders. The Rocky Mountain Regional HSRC will involve faculty and staff from the Center depending on community needs and faculty expertise. The effectiveness of outreach programs will be improved by incorporating a variety of face-to-face and technology-based methods to work with stakeholders. Our overall objective is to assist in the redevelopment of brownfields properties by providing information and support to communities.

Status of TAB Sites. The TAB program has been providing support to the Crow Nation, MT. The program has been working with the Crow Tribe since November 2000. We have provided assistance with Brownfields Assessment Grants, Brownfields Job Training Grants, Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Grants, Brownfields Cleanup Grants, and Tribal Response Programs Grants.

The Crow Reservation has a history of environmental issues pertaining to water quality, coal bed methane, coal mining, public health, UST, groundwater, non-point pollution, and environmental justice issues.

The TAB program has provided assistance to the Crow Tribe in the Brownfields Assessment Grant RFP Process, Phase I Evaluation Big Horn Carpet Mill, and public outreach.

The Crow Nation has a large number of hazardous waste issues that can be addressed with the TAB Program. In addition, we were awarded a Brownfield Job Training Grant on December 21, 2001. This grant significantly has contributed to our TAB activities at this location. The Crow Tribal Brownfields Coordinator and the Little Big Horn College Brownfields Coordinator will attend the Brownfields 2002 National Conference in Charlotte, NC.

The TAB Program will assist Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, MT, with issues concerning their brownfields sites, including the assessment process, site cleanup, redevelopment, and funding options.

Fort Belknap has a history of environmental concerns, including mining issues, landfills, groundwater, environmental justice, chemical contamination, pollution prevention, and cultural sites.

The TAB Program has provided the following activities: a Mining in the Environment Short Course (2000), Acid Rock Drainage Short Course (1999), Environmental Planning For Small Native American Community Short Course (2000), and a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Mapping Skills Short Course (2002).

Fort Belknap representatives are scheduled to attend the Brownfields 2002 National Conference in North Carolina to be held November 13-15, with Sherry Bishop serving as the Fort Belknap Brownfields Coordinator, assisting with Brownfield Assessment Grant Technical Assistance of both the Phase I and Phase II report.

Future Activities:

Future activities include the continuation of technology and/or method development and improvement for remediation of mine waste sites in an effort to find ways to improve human health and the environment in a cost-effective manner.


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Other center views: All 181 publications 16 publications in selected types All 16 journal articles
Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Bednar AJ, Garbarino JR, Ranville JF, Wildeman TR. Effects of iron on arsenic speciation and redox chemistry in acid mine water. Journal of Geochemical Exploration 2005;85(2):55-62. R829515 (2005)
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  • Journal Article Clark JL, Clements WH. The use of in situ and stream microcosm experiments to assess population- and community-level responses to metals. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2006;25(9):2306-2312. R829515 (2005)
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  • Journal Article Clements WH. Small-scale experiments support causal relationships between metal contamination and macroinvertebrate community responses. Ecological Applications 2004;14(3):954-967. R829515 (2003)
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  • Journal Article Hemsi PS, Shackelford CD, Figueroa LA. Modeling the influence of decomposing organic solids on sulfate reduction rates for iron precipitation. Environmental Science & Technology 2005;39(9):3215-3225. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Hemsi PS, Shackelford CD. An evaluation of the influence of aquifer heterogeneity on permeable reactive barrier design. Water Resources Research 2006;42(3):W03402, doi:10.1029/2005WR004629. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Hong H, Pruden A, Reardon KF. Comparison of CE-SSCP and DGGE for monitoring a complex microbial community remediating mine drainage. Journal of Microbiological Methods 2007;69(1):52-64. R829515 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Kashian DR, Prusha BA, Clements WH. Influence of total organic carbon and UV-B radiation on zinc toxicity and bioaccumulation in aquatic communities. Environmental Science & Technology 2004;38(23):6371-6376. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Logan MV, Reardon KF, Figueroa LA, McLain JET, Ahmann DM. Microbial community activities during establishment, performance, and decline of bench-scale passive treatment systems for mine drainage. Water Research 2005;39(18):4537-4551. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Paschke MW, Valdecantos A, Redente EF. Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration grass species. Environmental Pollution 2005;135(2):313-322. R829515 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Paschke MW, Perry LG, Redente EF. Zinc toxicity thresholds for reclamation forb species. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution 2006;170(1-4):317-330. R829515 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Pruden A, Messner N, Pereyra L, Hanson RE, Hiibel SR, Reardon KF. The effect of inoculum on the performance of sulfate-reducing columns treating heavy metal contaminated water. Water Research 2007;41(4):904-914. R829515 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Prusha BA, Clements WH. Landscape attributes, dissolved organic C, and metal bioaccumulation in aquatic macroinvertebrates (Arkansas River Basin, Colorado). Journal of the North American Benthological Society 2004;23(2):327-339. R829515 (2003)
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  • Journal Article Redman AD, Macalady DL, Ahmann D. Natural organic matter affects arsenic speciation and sorption onto hematite. Environmental Science & Technology 2002;36(13):2889-2896. R829515 (2002)
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  • Journal Article Ritter K, Aiken GR, Ranville JF, Bauer M, Macalady DL. Evidence for the aquatic binding of arsenate by natural organic matter--suspended Fe(III). Environmental Science & Technology 2006;40(17):5380-5387. R829515 (2005)
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  • Journal Article Rojas R, Velleux M, Julien P, Johnson B. Grid scale effects on watershed soil erosion models. Journal of Hydrologic Engineering 2008;13(9):793-802. R829515 (2003)
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  • Journal Article Velleux ML, Julien PY, Rojas-Sanchez R, Clements WH, England Jr JF. Simulation of metals transport and toxicity at a mine-impacted watershed: California Gulch, Colorado. Environmental Science & Technology 2006;40(22):6996-7004. R829515 (Final)
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  • Supplemental Keywords:

    acid mine drainage, remediation, mine waste, ecosystem protection, environmental exposure, risk, toxic, bioavailability, contaminant candidate list, geology, hazardous waste, hydrology, monitoring, modeling, national recommended water quality, selenium, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, cleanup, contaminant transport models, contaminated sediments, contaminated soil, copper, environmental toxicant, fate and transport, lead, manganese, metals, microbial populations, mine tailings, mining impacted watershed, modeling, sediment transport, surface water, total maximum daily loads., RFA, Scientific Discipline, Toxics, Waste, Ecosystem Protection/Environmental Exposure & Risk, Hydrology, National Recommended Water Quality, Bioavailability, Remediation, Contaminant Candidate List, Monitoring/Modeling, Fate & Transport, Hazardous Waste, Environmental Engineering, Geology, Hazardous, fate and transport, risk assessment, contaminated sediments, mathematical model, fate and transport , contaminant transport, lead, acid mine drainage, contaminated sediment, mine tailings, cleanup, sediment transport, modeling, surface water, contaminated soil, total maximum daily loads, manganese, Zinc, Selenium, toxicity, mining, copper, environmental toxicant, risk assessments, cadmium, arsenic, metals, microbial populations, contaminant transport models

    Relevant Websites:

    http://www.engr.colostate.edu/hsrc/multimedia/interview.mp3 Exit
    http://www.engr.colostate.edu/hsrc/ Exit
    http://www.engr.colostate.edu/hsrc/research.html Exit

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2003 Progress Report
  • 2004 Progress Report
  • 2005 Progress Report
  • Final Report
  • Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R829515C001 Redox Transformations, Complexation and Soil/Sediment Interactions of Inorganic Forms of As and Se in Aquatic Environments: Effects of Natural Organic Matter
    R829515C002 Fate and Transport of Metals and Sediment in Surface Water
    R829515C003 Metal Removal Capabilities of Passive Bioreactor Systems: Effects of Organic Matter and Microbial Population Dynamics
    R829515C004 Evaluating Recovery of Stream Ecosystems from Mining Pollution: Integrating Biochemical, Population, Community and Ecosystem Indicators
    R829515C005 Rocky Mountain Regional Hazardous Substance Research Center Training and Technology Transfer Program
    R829515C006 Technical Outreach Services for Communities and Technical Assistance to Brownfields
    R829515C007 Evaluation of Hydrologic Models for Alternative Covers at Mine Waste Sites
    R829515C008 Microbial Reduction of Uranium in Mine Leachate by Fermentative and Iron-Reducing Bacteria
    R829515C009 Development and Characterization of Microbial Inocula for High-Performance Passive Treatment of Acid Mine Drainage
    R829515C010 Reactive Transport Modeling of Metal Removal From Anaerobic Biozones
    R829515C011 Assessment of Electrokinetic Injection of Amendments for Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage
    R829515C012 Metal Toxicity Thresholds for Important Reclamation Plant Species of the Rocky Mountains
    R829515C013 An Improved Method for Establishing Water Quality Criteria for Mining Impacted Streams