2003 Progress Report: Assessing Life-Shortening Associated with Exposure to Particulate Matter

EPA Grant Number: R827353C005
Subproject: this is subproject number 005 , established and managed by the Center Director under grant R827353
(EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).

Center: Harvard Particle Center
Center Director: Koutrakis, Petros
Title: Assessing Life-Shortening Associated with Exposure to Particulate Matter
Investigators: Schwartz, Joel
Current Investigators: Schwartz, Joel , Bateson, Thomas F , Coull, Brent , O'Neill, M. , Zanobetti, Antonella
Institution: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , Harvard University
EPA Project Officer: Chung, Serena
Project Period: June 1, 1999 through May 31, 2005 (Extended to May 31, 2006)
Project Period Covered by this Report: June 1, 2003 through May 31, 2004
Project Amount: Refer to main center abstract for funding details.
RFA: Airborne Particulate Matter (PM) Centers (1999) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Air Quality and Air Toxics , Particulate Matter , Air

Objective:

During the first 2 years of this project, the research dealt with issues related to harvesting. The objective for the next year is to develop statistical methods for investigating confounding, dose-response relationships, and other particle health effects issues.

This is one of 10 projects funded by the Center. The progress for the other nine projects is reported separately (see reports for R827353C001 through R827353C004, and R827353C006 through R827353C011).

Progress Summary:

We continued analyses investigating harvesting in 10 European cities by examining all cause, respiratory, and cardiovascular deaths for all ages and stratifying by age groups. Our research project confirms that most of the effect of air pollution is not simply advanced by a few weeks and that effects persist for more than 1 month after exposure. We found that the effect size estimate for PM10 doubles when longer term effects for all mortality and cardiovascular mortality were considered and becomes five times higher for respiratory mortality. We found similar effects when stratifying by age groups (Zanobetti, et al., 2003).

A great deal of work was focused on the reanalysis of all of the previous studies that used generalized additive models to assess particulate matter (PM) health outcomes. In particular, recent work has shown that current approaches misestimate the standard errors of parametric terms when controlling for smooth functions, and this has raised questions about the entire approach. In addition to reanalyzing these data using different convergence criteria and natural splines, we have developed alternative approaches, including the penalized spline method (Zanobetti and Schwartz, 2003c). The results of the reanalysis did not change substantially from previously reported results (Schwartz, et al., 2003; Zanobetti and Schwartz, 2003b; Zanobetti and Schwartz, 2003c).

Future Activities:

We will continue to develop statistical methods for investigating confounding, dose-response relationships, and other particle health effects issues.


Journal Articles on this Report : 9 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other subproject views: All 22 publications 22 publications in selected types All 22 journal articles
Other center views: All 200 publications 198 publications in selected types All 197 journal articles
Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Bateson TF, Schwartz J. Selection bias and confounding in case-crossover analyses of environmental time-series data. Epidemiology 2001;12(6):654-661. R827353 (Final)
R827353C004 (2002)
R827353C004 (2003)
R827353C004 (2004)
R827353C004 (Final)
R827353C005 (2001)
R827353C005 (2002)
R827353C005 (2003)
R827353C005 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Epidemiology-Full Text HTML
    Exit
  • Abstract: Epidemiology-Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: Epidemiology-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Braga ALF, Zanobetti A, Schwartz J. Do respiratory epidemics confound the association between air pollution and daily deaths? European Respiratory Journal 2000;16(4):723-728. R827353 (Final)
    R827353C005 (2000)
    R827353C005 (2002)
    R827353C005 (2003)
    R827353C005 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: European Respiratory Journal-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: European Respiratory Journal-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Braga ALF, Zanobetti A, Schwartz J. The lag structure between particulate air pollution and respiratory and cardiovascular deaths in 10 US cities. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2001;43(11):927-933. R827353 (Final)
    R827353C005 (2001)
    R827353C005 (2002)
    R827353C005 (2003)
    R827353C005 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: ResearchGate-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: JOEM-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Dockery DW. Epidemiologic evidence of cardiovascular effects of particulate air pollution. Environmental Health Perspectives 2001;109(Suppl 4):483-486. R827353 (Final)
    R827353C005 (2002)
    R827353C005 (2003)
    R827353C005 (Final)
  • Full-text from PubMed
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Associated PubMed link
  • Journal Article Goodman PG, Dockery DW, Clancy L. Cause-specific mortality and the extended effects of particulate pollution and temperature exposure. Environmental Health Perspectives 2004;112(2):179-185. R827353 (Final)
    R827353C005 (2003)
    R827353C005 (Final)
    R827353C006 (Final)
  • Full-text from PubMed
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Journal Article O'Neill MS, Loomis D, Borja Aburto VH, Gold D, Hertz-Picciotto I, Castillejos M. Do associations between airborne particles and daily mortality in Mexico City differ by measurement method, region, or modeling strategy? Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology 2004;14(6):429-439. R827353 (Final)
    R827353C005 (2003)
    R827353C005 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Nature-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: Nature-Abstract & Full Text HTML
    Exit
  • Other: Research Gate-Abstract & Full Text
    Exit
  • Journal Article Schwartz J, Zanobetti A. Using meta-smoothing to estimate dose-response trends across multiple studies, with application to air pollution and daily death. Epidemiology 2000;11(6):666-672. R827353 (Final)
    R827353C005 (2000)
    R827353C005 (2002)
    R827353C005 (2003)
    R827353C005 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Epidemiology-Full Text HTML
    Exit
  • Abstract: Epidemiology-Abstract & PDF Link
    Exit
  • Other: Epidemiology-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Schwartz J, Ballester F, Saez M, Perez-Hoyos S, Bellido J, Cambra K, Arribas F, Canada A, Perez-Boillos MJ, Sunyer J. The concentration-response relation between air pollution and daily deaths. Environmental Health Perspectives 2001;109(10):1001-1006. R827353 (Final)
    R827353C005 (2000)
    R827353C005 (2002)
    R827353C005 (2003)
    R827353C005 (Final)
  • Full-text from PubMed
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Associated PubMed link
  • Journal Article Zanobetti A, Schwartz J. Cardiovascular damage by airborne particles:are diabetics more susceptible? Epidemiology 2002;13(5):588-592. R827353 (Final)
    R827353C004 (2001)
    R827353C004 (2002)
    R827353C004 (2003)
    R827353C004 (Final)
    R827353C005 (2003)
    R827353C005 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Epidemiology-Full Text HTML
    Exit
  • Abstract: Epidemiology-Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: Epidemiology-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Supplemental Keywords:

    exposure, health effects, susceptibility, mortality, cardiovascular mortality, biology, epidemiology, toxicology, air pollutants, air pollution, air quality, ambient air, ambient air monitoring, ambient air quality, ambient monitoring, ambient particle health effects, ambient particles, exposure assessment, biological mechanism, biological response, cardiopulmonary, cardiopulmonary response, cardiovascular disease, chemical exposure, environmental health hazard, exposure and effects, health risks, human exposure, human health, human health effects, human health risk, human susceptibility, indoor air quality, indoor exposure, outdoor exposure, inhalation, inhalation toxicology, inhaled particles, particle exposure, particulate exposure, particulates, pulmonary, pulmonary disease, respiratory, respiratory disease, risk assessment, sensitive populations., RFA, Health, Scientific Discipline, Air, Geographic Area, particulate matter, Toxicology, Environmental Chemistry, Epidemiology, State, Risk Assessments, Microbiology, Susceptibility/Sensitive Population/Genetic Susceptibility, Environmental Microbiology, Environmental Monitoring, genetic susceptability, Atmospheric Sciences, Molecular Biology/Genetics, Biology, Environmental Engineering, ambient air quality, interindividual variability, molecular epidemiology, particulates, risk assessment, sensitive populations, chemical exposure, cardiopulmonary responses, health risks, human health effects, indoor exposure, ambient air monitoring, ambient measurement methods, exposure, pulmonary disease, Utah (UT), developmental effects, epidemelogy, respiratory disease, air pollution, children, Human Health Risk Assessment, Massachusetts (MA), particle exposure, lung cancer, biological mechanism , pre-existing conditions, cardiopulmonary response, human exposure, inhalation, pulmonary, Illinois (IL), particulate exposure, ambient particle health effects, mortality studies, elderly, Connecticut (CT), human susceptibility, inhalation toxicology, indoor air quality, inhaled particles, air quality, cardiovascular disease, dosimetry, human health risk, respiratory, genetic susceptibility

    Relevant Websites:

    https://cfserver.hsph.harvard.edu/cfdocs/eer/epa/ Exit

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 1999 Progress Report
  • 2000 Progress Report
  • 2001 Progress Report
  • 2002 Progress Report
  • 2004
  • Final Report

  • Main Center Abstract and Reports:

    R827353    Harvard Particle Center

    Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R827353C001 Assessing Human Exposures to Particulate and Gaseous Air Pollutants
    R827353C002 Quantifying Exposure Error and its Effect on Epidemiological Studies
    R827353C003 St. Louis Bus, Steubenville and Atlanta Studies
    R827353C004 Examining Conditions That Predispose Towards Acute Adverse Effects of Particulate Exposures
    R827353C005 Assessing Life-Shortening Associated with Exposure to Particulate Matter
    R827353C006 Investigating Chronic Effects of Exposure to Particulate Matter
    R827353C007 Determining the Effects of Particle Characteristics on Respiratory Health of Children
    R827353C008 Differentiating the Roles of Particle Size, Particle Composition, and Gaseous Co-Pollutants on Cardiac Ischemia
    R827353C009 Assessing Deposition of Ambient Particles in the Lung
    R827353C010 Relating Changes in Blood Viscosity, Other Clotting Parameters, Heart Rate, and Heart Rate Variability to Particulate and Criteria Gas Exposures
    R827353C011 Studies of Oxidant Mechanisms
    R827353C012 Modeling Relationships Between Mobile Source Particle Emissions and Population Exposures
    R827353C013 Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols (TERESA) Study
    R827353C014 Identifying the Physical and Chemical Properties of Particulate Matter Responsible for the Observed Adverse Health Effects
    R827353C015 Research Coordination Core
    R827353C016 Analytical and Facilities Core
    R827353C017 Technology Development and Transfer Core