2016 Progress Report: Metabolic, Microbiome and Toxicant-Related Interactions (MATRIX)

EPA Grant Number: R836153C003
Subproject: this is subproject number 003 , established and managed by the Center Director under grant R836153
(EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).

Center: Center for Children’s Health, the Environment, Microbiome, and Metabolomics’ Center
Center Director: McCauley, Linda
Title: Metabolic, Microbiome and Toxicant-Related Interactions (MATRIX)
Investigators: Jones, Dean P. , Corwin, Elizabeth
Current Investigators: Jones, Dean P. , Corwin, Elizabeth , Li, Shuzhao
Institution: Emory University
EPA Project Officer: Louie, Nica
Project Period: September 1, 2015 through August 31, 2019
Project Period Covered by this Report: September 1, 2015 through August 31,2016
RFA: Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (2014) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Health , Children's Health

Objective:

Aim 1:  Identify maternal prenatal metabolic pathways and metabolite-microbiome correlations that link environmental exposures and preterm birth. 

Aim 2: Identify maternal prenatal metabolic pathways and metabolite-microbiome correlations that link environmental exposures and infant neurodevelopment. 

Aim 3: Identify infant postnatal metabolic pathways and metabolite-microbiome correlations that link environmental exposures and infant neurodevelopment. 

The major goals outlined in the proposal for the first project period of this award were to: 1) review study goals with team members; 2) meet with bioinformatics analyst and laboratory staff to review and refine metabolomics protocols as necessary; 3) meet with Project 1 study team to coordinate upcoming transfer of environmental exposure data and with Parent Study (the microbiome in preterm birth study) research team to coordinate upcoming transfer of microbiome composition data and blood sample aliquots collected as part of that Study; 4) meet regularly (at least every other month) with all Center members including those representing the community, to discuss outreach efforts and early dissemination objectives; 5) begin metabolomic analyses to identify metabolites and metabolic pathways of pregnant women who have completed all sample collections. 6) coordinate with the Project 2 study team to coordinate upcoming transfer of infant microbiome data and blood aliquots as they are collected; 7) review process of electronic data transfers from Projects 1 and 2 and make adjustments if necessary; 8) initiate data coding and entry procedures; and 9) continue to collect delivery outcome data from Project 1.

Progress Summary:

The progress on each of these goals is as follows:

Goal 1: The goals for the Metabolic, Microbiome and Toxicant Related Interactions (MATRIX) study are reviewed monthly at study meetings with the study team and at Executive Committee meetings.

Goal 2: Metabolomics protocols have been reviewed regularly with our bioinformatics analyst and laboratory staff.

Goal 3: We have met with Drs. Barr, Dunlop, and Ryan, as well as the Parent Study (microbiome in preterm birth) team, to coordinate the transfer of blood sample aliquots to the metabolomics laboratories as well as the microbiome composition data. Of the 290 subjects currently enrolled in the Parent Study, 11 have environmental toxicant data from Project 1 and are, therefore, eligible for inclusion in Project 3. All infant samples described in the Project 2 progress report are eligible for inclusion in Project 3.

Goal 4: We continue to meet monthly with the Center leadership at Executive Committee meetings and every other month with community members, to discuss outreach and dissemination efforts. Moreover, Dr. Corwin has met with community members at our first Stakeholder Advisory Board (SAB) meeting. This meeting was comprised of both members of the Center for Children’s Health, the Environment, the Microbiome, and Metabolomics (C-CHEM2) and Health and Exposome Research Center: Understanding Lifetime Exposures (HERCULES) SABs. At this meeting Dr. Corwin described the concept of the microbiome to our SAB and took part in a roundtable discussion in the second half of the meeting, during which there was a great deal of interest and enthusiasm expressed by the community members. Dr. Corwin also spoke at our Children’s Environmental Health Research Roundtable, which is open to both community members and Emory faculty, staff, and students, where she provided an overview of the process and value of metabolomics in children’s environmental health research.

Goal 5: Although metabolomic analyses of serum from the first 184 pregnant women participating in the Parent Microbiome study have begun, all of these women delivered prior to the initiation of C-CHEM2 study and therefore no samples from participants enrolled in this Children’s Center P50 grant are included in these analyses, the seamless transfer of samples and the successful conduction of metabolomics assays suggests that future similar transfers and assays will likewise go smoothly.

Goal 6: We regularly meet with the Project 2 study team, Drs. Brennan and Rodriguez, to plan the transfer of samples from the infants and discuss any issues related to sample storage or future transfers.

Goals 7 and 8: We have reviewed the procedures for upcoming electronic data transfer processes during regular meetings.  We also have established a safe, sophisticated, and tested sample storage and management system that will facilitate all future transfer of electronic data. Under the direction of Nikolay Patrushev, the manager of the School of Nursing laboratory, samples have been scanned into our inventory system and are stored in dedicated freezers equipped with emergency backup power, Sensaphone Web600 web-based monitoring, and 8 hours of emergency CO2 backup cooling. An additional empty freezer with sufficient storage capacity is available to accommodate samples in the event of a primary freezer failure. The sample inventory system has been shared with the Project 1 and 2 teams. Excel-based inventories are stored on the secured Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing share-drive and backed up weekly on a secured laboratory hard drive.

Goal 9: We are continuing to collect labor and delivery outcome data under the Parent Study.

Future Activities:

We have had a successful project start up, hired highly qualified staff, and planned protocol implementation with care.  We have initiated enrollment and will continue to review progress with the investigative team and make adjustments (especially to recruitment strategies) if necessary.  We also will continue refining data coding and entry procedures during the next project period.  Additional staff training on infant assessments for later ages (Bayley Scales of Infant Development) and mother infant interaction coding will be initiated. The demonstrated ability of the parent project to recruit pregnant African American women in Atlanta, and to successfully collect all of the biobehavioral data needed from the prenatal phase of development, is highly significant and bodes well for the outcome of Project 2. Thus, our plans during the next reporting period are to continue to address our Specific Aims by recruiting participants and conducting our study as planned.


Journal Articles on this Report : 1 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other subproject views: All 10 publications 1 publications in selected types All 1 journal articles
Other center views: All 51 publications 16 publications in selected types All 16 journal articles
Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Li S, Dunlop AL, Jones DP, Corwin EJ. High-resolution metabolomics: review of the field and implications for nursing science and the study of preterm birth. Biological Research for Nursing 2016;18(1):12-22. R836153C001 (2016)
R836153C003 (2016)
R836153C003 (2017)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: SAGE Journals-Abstract
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  • Supplemental Keywords:

    health effects, human health, sensitive populations, infants, children, susceptibility, metals, community-based, environmental chemistry, biology, children's health, biochemistry, environmental chemistry, exposure, environmental monitoring, exposure assessment, developmental disorders, perinatal exposure, prenatal exposure, dietary exposure, biological markers, growth and development, children's vulnerability, exposure, risk, bioavailability, metabolism, vulnerability, chemicals, toxics, particulates, epidemiology, microbiology, metabolomics, modeling, monitoring, analytical, surveys, southeast, Atlanta

    Relevant Websites:

    http://www.nursing.emory.edu/c-chem2/index.html Exit

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2017 Progress Report
  • 2018

  • Main Center Abstract and Reports:

    R836153    Center for Children’s Health, the Environment, Microbiome, and Metabolomics’ Center

    Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R836153C001 Characterizing Exposures and Outcomes in an Urban Birth Cohort (CHERUB)
    R836153C002 Microbiome, Environment, and Neurodevelopmental Delay (MEND)
    R836153C003 Metabolic, Microbiome and Toxicant-Related Interactions (MATRIX)