2018 Progress Report: Center for Children's Health, the Environment, Microbiome, and Metabolomics

EPA Grant Number: R836153
Center: Center for Children’s Health, the Environment, Microbiome, and Metabolomics’ Center
Center Director: McCauley, Linda
Title: Center for Children's Health, the Environment, Microbiome, and Metabolomics
Investigators: McCauley, Linda , Ryan, P. Barry
Institution: Emory University
EPA Project Officer: Nolt-Helms, Cynthia
Project Period: September 1, 2015 through August 31, 2019
Project Period Covered by this Report: September 1, 2017 through October 31,2018
Project Amount: $1,797,870
RFA: Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (2014) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Health , Children's Health

Objective:

Emory University's Center for Children's Health, the Environment, Microbiome, and Metabolomics (CCHEM2) conducts research on how environmental exposures influence the microbiome of infants and children and the subsequent influence of changes in the microbiome on neurodevelopment. Investigators hypothesize that environmental exposure, the microbiome, HPA axis, and immune system together influence neurocognitive and socioemotional development. Type of delivery, genetics, type of feeding, postnatal stress, and maternal-infant interaction are posited as moderators of this intergenerational risk process. The overall goal is to assess the influence of the environmental exposures of pregnant women on their microbiome and the subsequent impact of the mother's microbiome on neurodevelopment of the fetus and infant. Achieving this goal would afford a more complete understanding of these effects and consequent ability to translate research strategies to reduce environmental exposures and reduce the prevalence of environmentally-related diseases mitigated by the microbiome.

Progress Summary:

Project 1: Focus on the measurement of environmental exposures of the pregnant women and their infants and specifically the association of internal exposures to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the home environment and their associations with birth outcome.

  1. Enrollment, Data Collection: We have continued to implement all protocols and procedures for the

    recruitment and consent of subjects, the collection of data and specimens (questionnaire items, biological and household samples), and the handling, processing, and analysis of specimens that were developed and refined by the P1 Team during Year 1. During this Year, we maintained Emory Institutional Review Board approval for the P1 recruitment and data collection protocols; utilized data bases for participant and sample tracking; and maintained training of field staff in the consent, data collection, data and sample handling and processing procedures.

    1. Prenatal: As of 03/31/2018, we have enrolled 260 pregnant women into the P50 protocol. Among the 260 enrolled pregnant women, the following completed the planned sample collections during the initial prenatal clinic visit (between 8-14 weeks' gestation): 255 completed microbiome swab collections, 253 completed venous blood collection, and 250 completed urine sample collection. Of the 260 enrolled pregnant women, 215 have passed through the 20-30 week gestational age window for the home environmental assessment, with 118 women (55%) consenting to participate and completing the home assessments. Our team is actively reaching out to the 25 enrolled women who are approaching the gestational age window for the home environmental assessments to schedule those home visits, and we are continuing to recruit and enroll into the Parent Study and P1. All biological and environmental specimens from enrolled subjects have been processed and entered into a long-term biorepository created for this project. We have maintained participant tracking in a Microsoft Access database and participant survey and assay data in a RedCap database. In addition, we are currently implementing a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for biospecimen tracking and long-term laboratory data processing and storage of laboratory meta-data.

    1. Postnatal: Consistent with our developed protocols and procedures, we also initiated recruitment of birthed infants into P1 in December 2015. To date, we have collected the following number of urine samples from diapers at the various post-birth time points: 70 samples at 1-week, 49 samples at 3-months, 34 samples at 6-months, and 24 samples at 12-months, and 13 samples at 18-months.

  1. Exposure and Outcome Characterization:
    1. Environmental Toxicants:

      1. We performed pilot testing of our laboratory methods for analysis of serum toxicants using serum samples collected from women in the same Parent Study Cohort, under a pilot funding award: Serum samples from the first 184 pregnant African American women enrolled in the Prenatal Microbiome Study were analyzed in the Health and Exposome Research Center: Understanding Lifetime Exposures (HERCULES) Analytic Chemistry Core Lab (the Laboratory for Exposure Assessment and Development in Environmental Research (LEADER) directed by Drs. Barr and Ryan) with funds from a HERCULES pilot award made to a junior faculty mentored by PIs Dunlop and Corwin. This chemical toxicant analysis involves a solvent extraction and cleanup with analysis by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

      2. In addition, we have performed quantification of urine phthalates, alkylphenols including bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol F (BPF), and cotinine among 169 enrolled pregnant women including N=169 hospital visit 1 samples, N=123 home visit samples and N=96 hospital visit 2 samples for a total of N=388 samples. We found that our population has higher levels of a metabolite of diethylphthalate than does the US population as a whole and US non-Hispanic Black population. Urinary cotinine levels indicate about 30% of our population is actively smoking with is greater than the percentage reporting smoking. We are continuing phthalate, alkylphenol and cotinine analyses in the remainder of the samples we have collected at present and anticipate their completion in July 2018.

      3. We measured persistent organic pollutants including DDT, its degradate DDE, PCBs and PBDEs in the same 169 women. We found higher levels of PBDE congener 47 in our population than in the general US population and DDE levels that were more similar to population-based levels derived over 15 years ago indicating persistently high body burdens of DDE in our population.

      4. We measured parabens, bisphenol S, poly- and per-fluoroalkyl substances, current-use pesticides, PAHs, heavy metals and metalloids in N=56 women (hospital visit 1 samples) to determine prevalence and magnitude of exposures in our population. Our data indicate widespread exposure to all of these chemicals with current-use pesticide levels higher than pre-residential ban levels measured 15 years ago in the US population.

    2. Microbiome:
      1. We have transferred the microbiome swab samples collected on enrolled women to the Emory Integrated Genomics Core for DNA extraction and 16S rRNA gene sequencing; we have established the bioinformatics pipeline to process the raw sequence data using QIIME2 analytic software and an RDP classifier.

      2. To enhance our ability to classify the microbes making up the vaginal microbiome and discern the effects of specific exposures on the vaginal microbiome composition, we have engaged School of Nursing Junior Faculty member, Dr. Michelle Wright, to build a vaginal-specific sequence data base of microbial genera and species aligning to the V3-V4 primer region being used for the microbiome sequencing for P1.

    3. Pregnancy Outcomes: We have ascertained pregnancy outcomes (via maternal and infant medical record abstraction) for the 216 enrolled pregnant women who have reached their pregnancy due date, with the following birth outcomes noted: 18 spontaneous abortions; 2 medically-indicated abortions; 24 preterm births; 59 early term births; 103 full term births; and 10 lost-to-follow-up (without delivery outcome records available and unable to contact the participant).

Project 2: Collect infant microbiome, inflammatory marker, and developmental data to examine the association between the prenatal exposures, the infant gut-brain axis, and cognitive/behavioral functioning in the first 18 months of life.

1) Data collection for the Microbiome, Environment, and Neurodevelopmental Delay study has continued throughout the year, and we now have 133 mother-infant pairs enrolled in the postnatal follow up; 2) We have worked to cultivate strong relationships with research participants and this has resulted in a successful retention rate of over 80%; 3) Our research staff have received training in Bayley Scales of Infant Development through infant age 18 months; 4)We have successfully implemented our data collection protocols at all infant follow ups; 5) We continue to work synergistically with Project 1 staff to complete home visits where dust and other data on environmental exposures are collected; 6) We have successfully collected and stored over 4000 samples of stool, urine, blood, and buccal cells; 7) We have obtained additional funding from the American Psychological Foundation and the HERCULES center to obtain fMRI data on over 30 newborns in the MEND cohort. Data collection for the infant imaging study began this spring and will enable us to examine relationships between prenatal exposures (stress, cotinine and THC), infant neural measures, and neurobehavioral outcomes.

Project 3: Use high-resolution metabolomics of the pre- and postnatal samples to test for complex interactions (e.g., exposure x metabolome, microbiome x metabolome, metabolome x HPA axis, immune, neurocognitive and socioemotional measures) that contribute to neurocognitive and socioemotional outcomes.

Drs. Jones and Li conducted metabolomic analyses on the serum samples collected as part of Project 1. The experimental analyses were completed for samples collected from the first 274 pregnant women enrolled in the P50 since January 2016 and who have completed all data collections. Data analysis is ongoing in multiple areas. For example, metabolome wide association analysis revealed the metabolites and metabolic pathways enhanced or reduced in association with chronic stress exposure. Chronic stress exposure is recognized both as risk factor for adverse birth outcomes and as being experienced disproportionately by African Americans, the population most at risk for nearly all adverse birth outcomes and the population under study in this P50 award. The pathway enrichment analyses revealed a number of metabolites and pathways previously associated in the literature with increased oxidative stress, energy production, and vitamin deficiencies; findings from this study are under review for publication.

Analyses of samples collected from the first 201 pregnant women were also analyzed for exposure to brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47, the most abundant flame retardant found in the serum samples. Findings revealed the metabolites and metabolic pathways enhanced or reduced in association with PBDE-47 exposure in this high-risk group of women.

Administrative Core (AC): Functions to coordinate and facilitate the integration of all Center’s activities and components including the infrastructure for the development and maintenance of research related to the science theme of the Center.

Children's Environmental Health Research Roundtables (CEHRR): Our AC has continued to work closely with our Center investigators as well as partners in the Health and Exposome Research Center: Understanding Lifetime Exposures (HERCULES) to communicate scientific findings, opportunities, and areas of collaboration among Center members and the broader Emory research community. Our CEHRR fosters dialogue around children's environmental health research and remains well received by the larger Emory scientific community and is regularly attended by students, staff, and faculty from four schools across the University.

Notably, members of our Stakeholder Advisory Board, and other community members continue to attend these events and actively participate in the dialogue. This series has evolved from a mechanism to inform the Emory community on the purpose, structure, and opportunities for collaboration with Center to a dynamic platform for exposing the research community to national trends in children's environmental health research.

C-CHEM2 Website, Listserv, and Social Media: We continue to expand our communication network that consist of faculty, staff, students, and community partners to disseminate relevant information related to the theme of the Center as well as update the Emory community on important Center opportunities such as pilot awards and summer undergraduate research opportunities, community events, conferences, and employment and training opportunities related to children's environmental health. Since January 2018, our primary concentration has been on quantitatively improving our outreach on various social media platforms. Our Administrative Core (AC) has supported the Center's overall outreach and translation efforts by establishing baseline data on the centers web based outreach efforts. Since we have began tracking our social media presence we have seen substantial increases in our Facebook and Twitter impressions. The majority of our Facebook audience is women in the age range of 25-44. Geographically, the majority of our social media followers are form the Atlanta Metro area. However, through our collaborations with members of the Social Media Workgroup we have also established a social media presence with followers from Illinois, New York, and California. This proportion or women to men and age distribution was similar in our Twitter following. We attribute much of the success of our social media presence to the involvement in the CEHC Social Media Workgroup activities as well as our Community Outreach and Translation Core's "Know Better Live Better" social media campaign. From year two to three our website page views increased by 66.20% to 5,955 views in year three. Our overall bounce rate, a measure of visitor retention past the page of entry, was down by 52.34%. The average time spent on the Community Outreach and Translation Core (COTC) page increase by 105.39%. The reduction in bounce rate, coupled with increase in average time spent on key pages, is an overall indicator of the effectiveness of our Center’s website. Additionally, the number of unique page views on our site almost doubled from year two to three to 5,152 views. We attribute much of this success to the COTC’s "Know Better Live Better" social impact campaign. This increased traffic is also a surrogate marker of the focus the Center has put on children’s environmental health research within the Emory research community through our CEHRR series and pilot award program. Due to its popularity and ease of use, our site also now serves as the template for other research webpages at the NHWSN.

Community Outreach and Translation Core: Builds on substantial community engagement already in place in our NIEHS-funded HERCULES center and provides for bi-directional exchange between African American families in Atlanta and scientists.

Specific aims of the Community Outreach and Translation Core (COTC) are listed below. Of special note is our Know Better, Live Better Social Impact campaign, developed in a collaborative effort between Center researchers, COTC staff, Stakeholder and Health Advisory Boards. Campaign deliverables include an educational film, several print and social media promotional assets. A marketing firm has been hired to guide and support campaign launch and roll out of related social media, event, print and brand ambassador promotion.

Maintain and expand bi-directional dialogue with metropolitan AA women of child-bearing age and their families Formally established a Stakeholder Advisory Board (SAB) to oversee COTC activities and facilitate communication between the community and the Center.

The COTC and Administrative Core (AC) collaborated to formally establish the Center for Children's Health, the Environment, the Microbiome, and Metabolomics (C-CHEM2) Stakeholder Advisory Board (SAB). The overall objective of the C-CHEM2 SAB is to steer COTC strategy and information sharing in ways that are relevant, accessible and culturally relevant to our community partners and target audience. The SAB consists of 13 active members: five non-profit groups focused on Black maternal health, two business focused on holistic care for African American women, three governmental agencies (CDC, FDA, and Fulton County Health Department), one midwifery practice serving predominantly African American families, and two academic institutions (Emory and Morehouse). Since the SAB initial establishment, COTC staff has made special effort to recruit organizations that are aligned with C-CHEM2 mission, as well as shift less engaged members into "partnership" status.

General board meetings are held quarterly, with working group meetings held as needed. In response to SAB member requests for greater environmental health competency- all meetings consist of an informative component. In order to foster community partner-scientist interaction special consideration is given to meeting location and agenda items. For example, former SAB meetings have included an excursion to the Fernbank Museum of Natural History Microbiome Exhibit, as well as a holiday party at the historic "Mary Mac's Tearoom.' To date, SAB members have offered constructive criticism on outreach strategy and insightful feedback on where COTC should focus its effort. Most recently SAB members have contributed to the Know Better Live Better social impact campaign, by attending working group sessions and guiding the COTC on the evaluation of KBLB video, specifically on its cultural relevance and ability to be used as an education tool. In addition, SAB members collaborated to create an information sheet on the vaginal microbiome to address intravaginal practices among African American women.

Participate in outreach activities to learn community-based environmental health concerns and to share relevant C- CHEM2 research processes and finding with community members.

To foster a meaningful relationship with our SAB members and community, COTC staff have stayed in regular communication with SAB members, attended partner's events, and sought out collaborative opportunities with community partners. Examples of community partnerships cultivated and maintained in year 3, include: Sankofa Cultural Breastfeeding Coalition, Healthy Mothers Health Babies Coalition of Georgia Policy Task Force, First Steps GA, Parents as Teachers of Georgia, Sheltering Arms, BLKHLTH, Centering Pregnancy at Grady, Doulas of Color Collective, Atlanta Baby Exchange, Favor Academy of Excellence, Center for Black Women's Wellness (CBWW), Maitu Foods, Satcher Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine, MotherToBaby Georgia (Center for Maternal Substance Abuse and Child Development), Spellman's GLOBE Med program, Black Mamas Matter Alliance, and OBGYN& Midwife Associates.

In addition, COTC has been an active member the Atlanta Healthy Start Initiative's Community Action Network. The AHSI/CAN Consortium's common agenda is to improve women's health in the metro Atlanta area. The alliance consists of predominantly African American women, serving African American women and children based in metro Atlanta.

Monthly meetings consist of strategy building and leveraging our networks to address common aims, while integrating each organizations objective. To date, COTC has participated in three community fairs, several "collective impact strategy" sessions and presented an overview of Center activities and research to CAN members.

The Center's inaugural newsletter was released December 8, 2017 with an aim to provide an overview and highlight of Center research and accomplishments. The newsletter will be released biannually. Highlights from December's issue include: a welcome letter from principal investigator Dr. Barry Ryan, student accomplishments, pilot award successes, research project recent publications, COTC highlights, and transcribed interview with Dr. Angela Coaxum-Young (Center SAB member) and Dr. Jeannie Rodriguez (Project 2 Junior Investigator). The newsletter was sent out to one hundred- eighty (180) individuals and organizations, including other CEH Centers, universities, students, and community partners.

Develop strategies to translate existing children's environmental health knowledge and emerging findings into practical information that families can use to protect their children's health. Applying principles of community engagement to develop culturally-appropriate online/social media messaging that depicts exposure sources and associated health impacts and demonstrates simple actions to reduce children's exposure to environmental toxicants with easy accessibility.

Efforts toward this aim include:

  • National Social Media Campaign (see Administrative Core Accomplishments)

  • Know Better, Live Better Campaign content/asset development including film development and production, as well as print and social media assets (Nov 2017- April 2018)

  • Collaboration with BLKHLTH consultants to develop infographics on phthalates, flame retardants, microbiome, simple swaps and Center overview (Feb 2018-present).

  • Promotion of National Black Maternal Health Week social media campaign posts on Center and Emory School of Nursing social media platforms (April 2018)

  • Development of Children's Environmental Health Outreach Curriculum

Continue to add to/update Center website with health information, Center videos, social media links and community resources.

Compared to the previous year, Center website analytics report an increase in views across all Center web pages. The number of total visitors to the Center website (N=1575), COTC page views (N=834) and average time on COTC page (3:07 minutes) all increased April 2017 to April 2018. The COTC page specifically, is the second most viewed webpage after the Center "about" page. In addition, COTC page visits and average time on page- have nearly doubled, when compared to year 2.

The current COTC website is under review for update of materials and re-organization for greater accessibility and appeal to a lay audience. The COTC/KBLB landing page aims to provide Center research, outreach material (i.e., videos, infographics, etc.), social media links, community resources, evidence based research; as well as promote Center events and newsletter archive.

The Center posts daily on Facebook (208 followers), Instagram (164 Followers) and Twitter (103 Followers) social media platforms.

Evaluate implemented strategies and the effectiveness of the products developed.

To date, online surveys and social media analytics have been the primary evaluation tools to collect SAB feedback and target/lay audience interest and engagement with Center outreach education materials.

An evaluation of Stakeholder Advisory Board (SAB) guidance on Center outreach was carried out by an Emory graduate public health student in March (2018). Eleven of the thirteen active SAB members responded to an online survey inquiring how SAB activities supported COTC goals 1-3 (Goal 4 does not apply to the SAB). There was agreement that the SAB support bi-directional dialogue (Goal 1) and development of strategies to translate existing children's environmental health knowledge into practical information (Goal 2). There were varied responses in response to SAB guidance of C-CHEM2 scientists in community engagement/outreach (Goal 3). Evaluation results along with suggested recommendations will be presented and discussed at the next SAB meeting (summer 2018).

Guide C-CHEM2 Scientists in Community Engagement and Outreach

Regularly update C-CHEM2 leadership regarding community environmental concerns and COTC outreach activities at the monthly executive committee meetings.

COTC and Administrative Core core representatives attend monthly executive meetings and update the C-CHEM2 leadership accordingly. SAB Member Ayanna Robinson, was nominated to join the executive committee and advocate for SAB/community identified priorities and updates. Ms. Robison succeeds SAB member Aneeqah Ferguson served the Center in this capacity for the past two years. As preliminary results begin to emerge, COTC/SAB members are poised to be a great asset to the researchers in sharing of results and translation of the research.

Provide C-CHEM2 scientists opportunities for direct community engagement and assist scientist in developing meaningful messages for childbearing women and families.

Center PIs are kept abreast of all scheduled SAB meetings/activities and are invited to attend. For example, PIs were invited to attend the SAB meeting in which vaginal microbiome data was presented, the working group session during which an information sheet regarding the vaginal microbiome and intravaginal practices was created, as well as the editing process for the information sheet. Additionally, specific researchers are invited to present to and dialogue with SAB members in the relevant working groups, such as Project 1 co-lead, Dr. Dana Barr, who was invited to speak on her phthalate exposure research. For example, researchers, Stakeholder Advisory Board and Health Advisory Board members were consulted in the development of the Know Better Live Better campaign and film editing process via email, phone, and attendance at initial brainstorming meetings with the production team. In turn, community members are invited to attend monthly round table discussion sessions that spotlight the research of specific scientists.

Create linkages among C-CHEM2 scientists, graduate students, HERCULES community service offerings and community based organization to encourage dialogue and support community partners.

COTC is preparing to launch our second round of two community mini-grants ($2500 each). Local, community based non-profit organizations working on a specific environmental health exposure or a disease with a known environmental cause/trigger- will be invited to apply. In order to support candidates that may be new to the grant application process, on our website under "Resources," is a link to the video recording from last year's grant application workshop led by Dr. Melanie Pearson, HERCULES CEC Director. HERCULES is Emory's NIEHS-funded Environmental Health Sciences Core Center (P30 ES019776).

In order to create linkages between environmental exposures, Black maternal health outcomes and raise awareness of the Center's research aims- COTC hosted a "lobby sit in" on April 11, 2018. Center staff, researchers, nursing and public health students were prompted to identify how environmental health may be influencing Black maternal health disparities and potential risk factors/sources of exposures. Engagement from this event was captured through pictures that were posted on Facebook and shared to various student groups, researchers, community partners, as well as other CEH Centers.

COTC lead a webinar for the Georgia Department of Public Health First Steps, Families First Programs on November 21, 2017. The webinar was attended by 24 first steps leaders with 22 counties in Georgia represented.

The COTC team was an invited speaker and workshop leader at the Georgia Department of Public Health Parents As Teachers (PAT) Annual Meeting held in Atlanta, GA on March 14, 2018. The 2 workshops were 1 1/2 hours each entitled "The Environment and Health: What Every Caregiver Needs to Know". Attendees learned about diseases and illnesses associated with environmental exposures, common sources of exposure to harmful chemicals in the home, and various media tools to assist families to make small changes to reduce harmful chemicals in the home. The workshops were attended by 58 PAT educators, family support workers, and department of public health workers serving over 2,000 families within 25 counties in Georgia represented. Approximately 42% of the PAT families identify at African American. Evaluative components of the workshop included 100% knowledge increase and 6 individual workshop average ratings between 4.77-4.97 (on a 0-5 scale).

The COTC also participated in a community level educational workshop with Sheltering Arms Atlanta based quarterly meeting held on March 21, 2018. COTC leaders provided similar knowledge and materials for Atlanta Head Start educators, Sheltering Arms health coordinators, and family support workers regarding diseases and illnesses associated with environmental exposures, common sources of exposure to harmful chemicals in the home, and various media tools to assist families to make small changes to reduce harmful chemicals in the home. The workshop was attended by 15 Sheltering Arms centers representing >3500 children living in 6 counties in Georgia. The Sheltering Arms population consists of 77% African American families.

Science.Art.Wonder and C-CHEM2 teamed up to produce two pieces of art with an emphasis on science education. The COTC team mentored 2 Emory undergraduate students majoring in biology/art and Human Health/Anthropology through a 6 month creative process where their final products were displayed at the Emory campus wide Arts-Science Symposium March 23, 2018 and at the metro Atlanta Science festival on March 24-2018 potentially reaching over 40,000 community members.

Integrate existing children's environmental health knowledge and new C-CHEM2 research findings into educational programs for healthcare professionals Expand training in environmental health with specific focus on prenatal and early childhood exposures for Emory's students at both the graduate and undergraduate level.

Abby Mutic, COTC educational outreach coordinator and PEHSU board member develops, organizes, and presents much of the environmental health educational curriculum and outreach strategies for the COTC. This information is conveyed to various audiences and with various pedagogical strategies utilizing differentiated instruction. Important environmental health topics have been integrated into Population Health, Community and Public Health Nursing courses. Ms. Mutic is a member of the Alliance for Nurses for Health Environments (ANHE), an organization with a long history of developing curriculum materials for environmental health nursing courses and is active with the research and education workgroups.

Ms. Mutic also leads our undergraduate student summer internship program (SURI). The SURI program engages student interns in 10 weeks of paid full-time research under the direction of one of our Center investigators from either the School of Nursing, School of Medicine, Emory College of Arts and Science, or the School of Public Health. Students are placed with a mentor based on their career and research interested and the current needs of the Center. In week 1, Ms. Mutic orients the student to the Center, staff, and researchers. Student's identify a research project with mentorship from their main assigned mentor, Ms. Mutic, and assigned co-mentor(s). The student works with their mentors to outline a relevant literature review and develop a research plan, which will include a specific research question, the design, and methods to answer the research question. During the first month of the rotation, students spend one week rotating in each of the three labs within the Center as well as with the Community Outreach and Translation Core.

Students spend half the day observing the day to day operations of the project or core during this rotation phase. The rotations allow the student to gain a global perspective on the work of the Center. Students spend a significant amount of time attending research meetings, conducting a literature review, collecting and analyzing data, and preparing for a final presentation of their work and findings. SURI interns may, at the discretion of their mentors, be expected to present a poster or final oral presentation of their results. Students may also be invited to attend guest lectures or participate in other Center activities. Two outstanding undergraduate students have been chosen this year to start the SURI program in June 2018.


Journal Articles: 16 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other center views: All 51 publications 16 publications in selected types All 16 journal articles
Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Corwin EJ, Hogue CJ, Pearce B, Hill CC, Read TD, Mulle J, Dunlop AL. Protocol for the Emory University African American Vaginal, Oral, and Gut Microbiome in Pregnancy Cohort Study. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2017;17(1):161 (8 pp.). R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Edwards SM, Cunningham SA, Dunlop AL, Corwin EJ. The maternal gut microbiome during pregnancy. MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing 2017;42(6):310-317. R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Frediani JK, Naioti EA, Vos MB, Figueroa J, Marsit CJ, Welsh JA. Arsenic exposure and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) among U.S. adolescents and adults: an association modified by race/ethnicity, NHANES 2005-2014. Environmental Health 2018;17(1):6 (8 pp.). R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Gardinassi LG, Xia J, Safo SE, Li S. Bioinformatics tools for the interpretation of metabolomics data. Current Pharmacology Reports 2017;3(6):374-383. R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Gardinassi LG, Cordy RJ, Lacerda MVG, Salinas JL, Monteiro WM, Melo GC, Siqueira AM, Val FF, Tran V, Jones DP, Galinski MR, Li S. Metabolome-wide association study of peripheral parasitemia in Plasmodium vivax malaria. International Journal of Medical Microbiology 2017;307(8):533-541. R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Li S, Dunlop AL, Jones DP, Corwin EJ. High-resolution metabolomics: review of the field and implications for nursing science and the study of preterm birth. Biological Research for Nursing 2016;18(1):12-22. R836153C001 (2016)
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  • Journal Article Mutic AD, Baker BJ, McCauley LA. Deleterious effects from occupational exposure to ethylene thiourea in pregnant women. Workplace Health and Safety 2017;65(12):595-602. R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Mutic AD, Jordan S, Edwards SM, Ferranti EP, Thul TA, Yang I. The postpartum maternal and newborn microbiomes. MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing 2017;42(6):326-331. R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Rodriguez J, Huntington-Moskos L, Johnson A, Williams S, Gulledge E, Feeley C, Rice M. Collecting biological measures for research with children and adolescents. Journal of Pediatric Health Care 2016;30(3):279-283. R836153C002 (2016)
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  • Journal Article Rodriguez J, Jordan S, Mutic A, Thul T. The neonatal microbiome: implications for neonatal intensive care unit nurses. MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing 2017;42(6):332-337. R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Runkle J, Flocks J, Economos J, Dunlop AL. A systematic review of Mancozeb as a reproductive and developmental hazard. Environment International 2017; 99:29-42. R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Swales DA, Winiarski DA, Smith AK, Stowe ZN, Newport DJ, Brennan PA. Maternal depression and cortisol in pregnancy predict offspring emotional reactivity in the preschool period. Developmental Psychobiology 2018;60(5):557-566. R836153 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Jordan, S., Baker, B., Dunn, A., Edwards, S., Ferranti, E. Mutic, A., Yang, I., & Rodriguez, J. (2017). Maternal‐child microbiome:Collection, storage, and implications for research and practice. Nursing Research, 66(2), 175‐183. R836153 (2017)
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    Journal Article Rodriguez, J., Huntington-Moskos, L., Johnson, A., Williams, S., Gulledge, E., Feeley, C., & Rice, M. (2016). Collecting biological measures for research with children and adolescents. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, Doi 10.1016/j.pedhc.2015.12.007. R836153C002 (2017)
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    Journal Article Rodriguez, J., Jordan, S., Mutic, A., & Thul, T. The neonatal microbiome:Implications for the NICU nurse. MCN:The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. (in press). R836153 (2017)
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    Journal Article Mutic, A., Jordan, S., Ferranti, E., Thul, T., Edwards, S., Yang, I. (2017). The Postpartum and Newborn Microbiomes. MCN; The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. (in press). R836153 (2017)
    R836153C002 (2017)
    not available

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2016 Progress Report
  • 2017 Progress Report
  • Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R836153C001 Characterizing Exposures and Outcomes in an Urban Birth Cohort (CHERUB)
    R836153C002 Microbiome, Environment, and Neurodevelopmental Delay (MEND)
    R836153C003 Metabolic, Microbiome and Toxicant-Related Interactions (MATRIX)