2002 Progress Report: Hazardous Substance Research Center–South and Southwest

EPA Grant Number: R828773
Center: HSRC (2001) - South and Southwest HSRC
Center Director: Reible, Danny D.
Title: Hazardous Substance Research Center–South and Southwest
Investigators: Reible, Danny D. , Hughes, Joseph B , McCook, Leigh Fitzpatrick , Edge, Billy
Current Investigators: Reible, Danny D. , Pardue, J. , Hughes, Joseph B , McCook, Leigh Fitzpatrick , Edge, Billy
Institution: Louisiana State University , Texas A & M University , Louisiana State University - Baton Rouge , Georgia Institute of Technology , Rice University
Current Institution: Louisiana State University - Baton Rouge , Georgia Institute of Technology , Rice University , Texas A & M University , The University of Texas at Austin
EPA Project Officer: Lasat, Mitch
Project Period: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2006 (Extended to September 30, 2007)
Project Period Covered by this Report: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2002
Project Amount: $5,550,000
RFA: Hazardous Substance Research Centers - HSRC (2001) Recipients Lists
Research Category: Hazardous Waste/Remediation , Nanotechnology , Land and Waste Management

Objective:

The objective of the Hazardous Substance Research Center/South and Southwest (HSRC/S&SW) is to provide basic and applied research and technology transfer and community outreach that address hazardous substance problems, particularly, the engineering management of contaminated sediments, and other problems of special interest to communities within U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regions 4 and 6. Due to past and present toxic releases, these regions face serious hazardous substance problems and yet contain a significant fraction of the wetlands and inland waters found in the United States. The mission of the Center is to be a primary provider of the tools and to process knowledge required to respond to the hazardous substance problems posing the greatest risks to people and the environment. The Center consists of Louisiana State University (LSU) as the lead institution, Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Rice University (Rice), and Texas A&M University (TAMU). The broad range of expertise available to the research and outreach teams will ensure our ability to be truly community- and problem-driven.

The Center's specific areas of research include: (1) assessing the physical, chemical, and biological availability of contaminants in sediments; (2) evaluating and enhancing biotransformation processes in sediments; and (3) improving the science of risk management for contaminated sediments. The overriding objective is to improve the effectiveness of remedial approaches by seeking to understand and minimize contaminant release and exposure. Toward this end, four research projects have been conducted over the past year. These projects seek to: (1) evaluate the bioavailability of desorption-resistant contaminants; (2) develop improved approaches for in-situ containment and treatment; (3) assess contaminant losses during removal and episodic storm events; and (4) evaluate phytoremediation for remediation in wetlands and confined disposal facilities (CDFs).

This research program is complimented by a technology transfer and outreach effort focused nationally on contaminated sediments and their management, but regionally with respect to the broad range of hazardous substance issues that impact communities in the South and Southwest. The technology transfer efforts disseminate the research advances of the Center via both print and electronic media. The Technical Outreach Services to Communities (TOSC) efforts focus on providing environmentally troubled communities and the public in the region technical assistance to enable them to better understand and participate in decisions being made about their hazardous substance problems. The Technical Assistance for Brownfields (TAB) programs provides similar support for local and regional governments attempting to respond to the unique challenges of brownfields.

Center Overview. Critical to the effective management of sediments is an understanding of the long-term fate of the contaminants. Are long-term transformation and degradation processes understood and is it possible to enhance their effectiveness? Are the long-lived residuals present in the sediments available for release and capable of causing exposure and risk to human and ecological health? Do we have practical tools to answer these questions and to aid in the selection and design of a remedial approach? These questions have led to the development of the following themes that help guide the research program.

  • Assessing the physical, chemical, and biological processes influencing contaminant availability

    This theme recognizes that exposure ultimately is defined by what fraction of the contaminants are available to organisms and not by what can be measured by exhaustive chemical extraction. Research into the rate and extent of contaminant availability is the key to defining environmentally acceptable endpoints and evaluating the effectiveness of natural recovery of any residual contamination in the sediments.

  • Evaluating and enhancing biotransformation processes in sediments

    Ultimately, only long-term fate processes can eliminate residual sediment contamination as a potential source of exposure in a dynamic surface water environment. These processes typically are controlled by microbial, macrobenthic, plant organisms, and whether they involve the influence of reduction-oxidation chemistry on metals availability or the long-term degradation of organics. The long-term risk reduction depends upon our ability to understand and enhance these processes.

  • Improving the science of risk management for contaminated sediments.

    The Center is focused on improving both the technologies that are applicable to contaminated sediments and our understanding of them. We need to be able to reliably predict the behavior of a particular remedial approach and compare that behavior to other alternatives.

    Although sediments are the primary focus of the Center's research and technology transfer programs, it is recognized that communities in EPA Regions 4 and 6 face a variety of challenges to the air, water, and soil quality, in addition to sediments. The community outreach efforts must recognize and respond to these concerns if they are to be effective in these Regions. The objective of the outreach efforts, therefore, is nationally based outreach and technology transfer in the management of contaminated sediments, and regionally and locally based outreach on the broad range of hazardous substance problems in the region, including contaminated sediments.

    The ultimate objective of the Center's efforts is research, technology transfer, and outreach products and services that are timely, credible, and significant, as well as relevant to the nation's environmental problems. The specific objectives include improving the identification and management of hazardous substance problems, particularly those associated with contaminated sediments; disseminating information about, and encouraging the use of, Center-developed technologies and methodologies by the industrial and regulatory communities; and developing effective educational and outreach programs. The Center's mission is to promote integrated and collaborative research designed to advance the science and technology of hazardous substance management and control. Cooperative interactions with industry, government, other academic institutions, and the public sector are key elements of the Center's comprehensive program of research, technology transfer, and education. The complex environmental problems that face the nation are not easily addressed by conventional single-investigator, single-institution research efforts. The Center has the ability to assemble teams of researchers that cross departmental and institutional boundaries to better address these problems.

Progress Summary:

Center Research Activities. Four research projects were funded and conducted over the past year. These projects seek to: (1) evaluate the bioavailability of desorption-resistant contaminants that may represent marginally contaminated sediment or residual sediment after the application of a sediment-remedial approach; (2) enhance our ability of addressing contaminated sediments in place through an improved understanding of fate and transport processes that control the effectiveness of in-situ containment (i.e., capping); (3) develop a better basis for assessing contaminant losses, especially from metal-contaminated sediments during resuspension events such as dredging or by storms; and (4) expand our capabilities for addressing wetland sediment and dredged material in confined disposal facilities by exploring the applicability and limitations of phytoremediation.

  1. Bioavailability of Desorption-Resistant Contaminants. Contaminated sediment quality is determined by the risks of contaminants to human and ecological receptors, which in turn, is controlled by the availability and exposure to those contaminants. Contaminants are generally assumed to be completely available to organisms that might ingest that sediment and to organisms in contact with pore water adjacent to contaminated sediment particles. Recent research, however, has shown that a significant fraction of the organic contaminants in soils and sediments may not be readily available for uptake and organism effects. A desorption-resistant fraction often is observed that is released more slowly and in lesser amounts from contaminated sediments. The slowed rates of physicochemical release also have been reflected in microbial degradation processes. Physicochemical measures of desorption resistance as an indication of bioavailability may hold great promise for assessing exposure and setting environmentally acceptable endpoints. In particular, the desorption-resistant contamination may represent the endpoint of natural attenuation processes. Up to the present time, however, there has been limited assessment of the bioavailability of this fraction beyond microbial assays. Other animals, notably deposit-feeding benthic organisms, may represent a more intense environment for the assessment of availability and are linked more directly to the food chain. Preliminary results with sediments and benthic organisms suggest that the ultimate organism uptake of desorption-resistant contaminants is reduced compared to reversibly desorbed contaminants but predictable with a biphasic equilibrium model. The preliminary work also suggests that the rate of uptake by benthic organisms is enhanced relative to that expected by physicochemical desorption measurements.

    The overall objective of this research project is to evaluate the dynamics of uptake and availability of desorption-resistant contaminants to tubificid oligochaetes. The studies are addressing two critical aspects of the bioavailability of the desorption-resistant compartment: the availability to sediment-dwelling, deposit-feeding macrofauna, and the effect of macrofaunal sediment processing on subsequent availability to other organisms or to natural desorption processes. These studies focus on polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are known to be biodegraded and bioaccumulated and are a primary sediment contamination problem in the Gulf Coast and other industrialized regions of the United States.

  2. In-Situ Containment and Treatment of Contaminated Sediments. The selection of removal versus non-removal remedial options often comes down to an attempt to compare the relatively short-term acute risks associated with dredging to the potential long-term chronic risks of in-situ containment or treatment. The balancing of severity for duration of exposure is always a difficult tradeoff, but it is made more difficult by the lack of reliable tools to assess fate processes and the relative release and exposure associated with the various options. In particular, it is difficult to protect against the potential exposure associated with failure of the containment or capping option if fate processes are so slow or uncertain that indefinite confinement is required. If indefinite containment is required, there always exists the possibility of a rare episodic event that may challenge the integrity of the sediment cap. In addition, if a sediment area is subject to significant seepage, a cap ultimately will be compromised by the continued migration of contaminants from below.

    If, however, contaminant fate processes can be enhanced or adequately assessed, it may be possible to define a design life for a cap, after which contaminant fate processes would be expected to have rendered the contaminant harmless. The project is directed toward enhancing cap structural integrity, developing the tools necessary to assess its integrity in the face of significant storm events, and evaluating and enhancing the degradation processes faced by contaminants beneath the cap. The objective is to produce a cap that is designed to be a stable long-term containment method that will release contaminants no faster than they can be degraded before release to the water column. This project is coordinating laboratory efforts with a demonstration program in the Anacostia River coordinated through the Center, which is evaluating the effectiveness of caps in the field.

  3. Phytoremediation of Wetland and CDF Sediments. Hydrophobic chlorinated organics such as hexachlorobenzene are common sediment contaminants that pose a threat to sensitive receptors. Prominent examples include the sediments of the Calcasieu Estuary and Devil's Swamp in Louisiana. These compounds are recalcitrant in sediments and bioaccumulate through the food chain. By contrast, rapid contaminant attenuation for certain chlorinated organics is observed in vegetated sediments (i.e., wetlands). In these sediments, enhanced biological processes (aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation and plant uptake) have been observed in the root zone that drives rapid natural recovery. Despite these observations, the fundamentals of vegetation/contaminant interactions in wetlands are poorly understood. Such process understanding is required before the fate of such compounds in wetland systems can be predicted and before the potential for using phytoremediation in constructed wetlands can be fully realized. A CDF is a temporary or permanent storage area for sometimes-contaminated sediments that is typically located in the nearshore environment. The ability to apply phytoremediation to the cleanup of the sediments within a CDF either directly or by adapting the CDF to serve as a constructed wetland is a promising approach. This research is attempting to gather the fundamental process knowledge required to realize that promise.

    The study is examining plant uptake and biodegradation processes in wetland plant rhizospheres. Specific objectives of this project include: defining the dynamics of plant uptake of chlorobenzenes in wetland sediments, defining the biodegradation potential in the rhizosphere by quantifying biogeochemical conditions, and evaluating appropriateness of models developed for agricultural species and trees to predict plant uptake into wetland vegetation. These objectives are being accomplished by mesocosm studies, experiments using plant uptake reactors, and geochemical measurements of representative sediments. These measurements are being supplemented by modeling to determine the predictive value of existing relationships for predicting plant uptake into wetland vegetation and to develop new relationships. Special aspects of the approach include the ability to provide a mass balance around the rhizosphere, plant uptake studies performed in Eh buffers to mimic different reduction intensities, micropeeper samplers to measure high-resolution changes in pore water concentrations across the rhizosphere, and preparation of artificially "aged" sediments for the study.

  4. Contaminant Losses During Sediment Resuspension by Removal or Storm Events. To conduct a comparative evaluation of sediment removal, or dredging, versus in situ means of managing contaminated sediment, it is necessary to assess the sediments and contaminants released by the sediments resuspended during dredging. This release defines the short-term risks associated with dredging and also is a significant source of residual contamination left behind by dredging. There are methods to estimate contaminant release during dredging, but the methods are not considered reliable because of the limited data on which they are based. The project is attempting to examine existing sources of data on dredging effectiveness to attempt to expand the database on which these methods are based. The vast majority of current dredging resuspension and loss estimates are associated with resuspended solids and not contaminants. Use of this information requires a means of relating sediment resuspension to contaminant release. For organic compounds, the assumption of local equilibrium is a reasonable one on which to evaluate release and exposure during dredging. Metal compounds, however, exhibit much more complicated behavior. During dredging, sediments typically move from an essentially anaerobic environment to an aerobic environment. The dynamics of this change in redox conditions would normally have a dramatic effect on metals availability and release. The primary objective of this research project is to improve our understanding of this process in the hope that a predictive relationship between the sediment resuspension and metals release can be realized. Although motivated by the need to assess contaminant release during dredging, the contaminant dynamics also mirror those observed during natural resuspension events such as storms. Thus, the research is expected to have a significant impact on the ability to evaluate contaminant release during storm events as well.

    The overall hypothesis being tested in this project is that physical-chemical and biological availability of the heavy metals Pb, Cd, Cu, and As are controlled predominantly by mechanisms of desorption from the solid phase and that desorption often is not the reverse of the sorption process (i.e., sorption and desorption frequently exhibit hysteresis). A second hypothesis being tested in this project is that, for purposes of predicting potential ecological exposure, sorption-desorption hysteresis can be characterized by using only a few key sediment-metal-solution descriptors. These descriptors are not yet selected, but might include measures of iron and manganese oxide content, some fraction of acid volatile sulfides (AVS) versus simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), percent organic matter in the sediment, and various solution-phase parameters. In all cases, the redox condition and change in redox of the sediment and the solution is important. Key descriptors are being identified by combining field data with batch experiments and modern surface examination and spectroscopy methods, such as atomic force microscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine spectra, which are in-situ methods. Once key descriptors have been evaluated, simplified assays and predictors will be developed for routine use. The final hypothesis to be tested is that the sorption and desorption of heavy metals, which leads to potential biota exposure, can be mathematically modeled using readily available or measurable properties of sediments and dredged materials along with properties of potentially impacted surface water bodies. Results will be tested with existing monitoring data and, if necessary, with additional measurements from the field sites.

    The knowledge gaps identified in these research projects are being closed. A research center approach is an excellent knowledge-generating structure to do so. The HSRC/S&SW is providing the direction, concentration of talents, and focusing of effort that is needed. A critical mass of talents at LSU, GIT, TAMU, and RICE has been attracted to conduct research activities in these areas. These talents and expertise are spread across colleges and institutions within these land grant, sea grant, and private universities. The focusing element is integrating the past and ongoing research efforts on both national and international fronts toward the specific need of developing a complete understanding of remediation technologies and the mechanisms of contaminant release, transport and fate, including ecological factors, and in contaminated sediment and dredged material. It is expected that these efforts will continue to ensure progress on the engineering management of contaminated sediments in the coming year.

Center Outreach Activities. The Center has three outreach programs with the following distinct objectives:

  • To provide technology transfer and training that disseminate research advances from the consortium to public- and private-sector audiences responsible for management and oversight of hazardous substance clean-up projects. This activity includes the development of a comprehensive set of Web-based resources; sponsorship of regular workshops, conferences, and symposia; publication of paper documents such as reports, brochures, and fact sheets on research projects and other technical topics; and field projects to demonstrate laboratory research activities.
  • To offer outreach support to environmentally troubled communities that need technical assistance to understand the contaminants that threaten them and to participate fully in site-remediation efforts. This activity will include site visits to communities, evaluation of technical documents for communities, participation in public hearings, and the development of Web resources.
  • To provide no-cost, nonadvocate technical assistance to communities and municipalities in EPA Regions 4 and 6 addressing the redevelopment of environmentally contaminated property, also known as brownfield properties. TAB assistance efforts strive to provide a community or municipality with the information needed to ask pertinent questions regarding the sustainable redevelopment of brownfields, remediation options, and to become informed participants in any decision-making processes.

The key approach and results of each of the three programs are described below.

Technology Transfer Program. The focus of the technology transfer program is outreach to the technical community that supports the public, industry, and government in managing hazardous substances. The objectives of the technology transfer program have been achieved through three primary approaches:

  1. Developing Web-based resources including the:
    • Development and maintenance of the national and South and Southwest Web sites as well as separate Web sites for the TOSC and TAB programs (http://www.hsrc.org Exit ).
    • Development and maintenance of a sediments Web community (http://www.sediments.org Exit ) that encourages researchers and practitioners to share knowledge in this focus area.
    • Web publication of a variety of documents, presentations, and features on contaminated sediments and other hazardous substance issues. Included among these is a Web site disseminating the content of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and National Science Foundation (NSF) Pan American Advanced Study Institutes on "In Situ Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sites" that were led by the HSRC/S& SW.
    • Support of a quarterly newsletter that continually updates the regional public, industry, and regulator communities on HSRC/S& SW activities.
    • Development of Web-based workshops with audio talks synchronized with lecture overheads both within the HSRC/S&SW and in cooperation with other groups (e.g., EPA Technology Innovation Office [TIO]).
    • Development of interactive training tools, including a current project to formalize some of the HSRC's long-term learning in sediments management into a Web-based course.
  2. Conducting training workshops, conferences, or symposia, and by sponsoring, organizing, or directoring a variety of other workshops and conferences including the:
    • NATO Advanced Study Institute on "In Situ Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sites" in Prague, Czech Republic.
    • NSF/Department of Energy (DOE) Pan American Advanced Study Institute on "In Situ Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sites" in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    • Physical Stability Workshop for Contaminated Sediments in New Orleans, LA, January 2002.
    • Sediment Management Workshop in Ft. Lauderdale, FL, January 2003.
    • Chemical Stability Workshop for Contaminated Sediments in San Diego, CA, scheduled for April 2003.
    • Contaminated Sediment Capping Workshop in Cincinnati, OH, scheduled for May 2003.
  3. Production of traditional publications:
    • Efforts with traditional publications have led to the publication of several "Research Briefs" and a five-Center publication detailing the plans for the new HSRC program in Centerpoint.

TOSC Program. By working closely with local, state, and federal environmental protection agencies, the TOSC has been able to assist small, newly organized communities and large, multicommunity organizations that have an established presence and are a driving force in local environmental assessment and remediation efforts. TOSC markets its services directly to communities through participation in national and regional environmental conferences, through contact with state and federal environmental agencies, and through word-of-mouth from communities that have benefited from TOSC's services. Broader dissemination of the Center's work is achieved via workshops and presentations, traditional publications, electronic newsletters, Internet, and Web activities.

During the 2002 calendar year, TOSC had 19 communities on its Active list. Although some communities requested and received more assistance than others, a community is considered active if there is continued contact between the two parties, and a desire on the community's part to have TOSC available to provide assistance if needed. Nearly all of these communities have a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in place or in development with TOSC. The active communities TOSC is assisting are facing problems ranging from groundwater contamination, air quality/permitting issues, landfills, and soil contamination.

In addition to these active communities, TOSC has provided technical assistance via telephone and electronic mail to 10 additional communities. These assistance efforts are usually one-time efforts, without a need for an MOU. Some of these assistance efforts are with communities outside of the EPA Regions the S&SW TOSC Program serves, providing the S&SW TOSC Program with a nationwide presence.

Technical Assistance for Brownfields Program. By working closely with local, state, and federal environmental protection agencies, TAB has been able to assist small, newly organized communities and large, multicommunity organizations that have an established presence and are a driving force in local environmental assessment and remediation efforts. TAB markets its services directly to communities through participation in national and regional environmental conferences, through contact with state and federal environmental agencies, and through word-of-mouth from communities that have benefited from TAB's services.

During the 2002 calendar year, TAB had 11 communities and municipalities on its Active list. Although some communities and municipalities requested and received more assistance than others, a community is considered active if there is continued contact between the two parties, and a desire on the community's part to have TAB available to provide assistance if needed. Many of TAB's clients are recipients of the EPA's Brownfield Assessment Demonstration Pilot Grants. Nearly all of these communities have an MOU in place or in development with TAB.

In addition to these active communities, TAB has provided technical assistance via telephone and electronic mail to 10 additional communities. These assistance efforts are usually one-time efforts, without a need for an MOU. Some of these assistance efforts are with communities outside of the EPA Regions the S&SW TAB Program serves, providing the S&SW TAB Program with a nationwide presence.

Future Activities:

The HSRC/S&SW will continue to provide basic and applied research and technology transfer and community outreach that address hazardous substance problems, the engineering management of contaminated sediments, and other problems of special interest to communities within EPA Regions 4 and 6.


Journal Articles: 63 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other center views: All 279 publications 92 publications in selected types All 63 journal articles
Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Apitz SE, Davis JW, Finkelstein K, Hohreiter DW, Hoke R, Jensen RH, Jersak J, Kirtay VJ, Mack EE, Magar VS, Moore D, Reible D, Stahl Jr. RG. Assessing and managing contaminated sediments: part I, developing an effective investigation and risk evaluation strategy. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management 2005;1(1):2-8. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Apitz SE, Davis JW, Finkelstein K, Hohreiter DW, Hoke R, Jensen RH, Jersak J, Kirtay VJ, Mack EE, Magar VS, Moore D, Reible D, Stahl Jr. RG. Assessing and managing contaminated sediments: part II, evaluating risk and monitoring sediment remedy effectiveness. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management 2005;1(1):e1-e14. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Chai Y, Kochetkov A, Reible DD. Modeling biphasic sorption and desorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediments. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2006;25(12):3133-3140. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Chai Y, Kochetkov A, Reible DD. Desorption resistance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and duration of exposure. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2006;25(11):2827-2833. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Chai Y, Kochetkov A, Reible DD. The use of coarse, separable, condensed-phase organic carbon particles characterize desorption resistance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2007;26(7):1380-1385. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Chen W, Kan AT, Newell CJ, Moore E, Tomson MB. More realistic soil cleanup standards with dual-equilibrium desorption. Ground Water 2002;40(2):153-164. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Chen W, Lakshmanan K, Kan AT, Tomson MB. A program for evaluating dual-equilibrium desorption effects on remediation. Ground Water 2004;42(4):620-624. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Chen W, Cong L, Hu H, Zhang P, Li J, Feng Z, Kan AT, Tomson MB. Release of adsorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under cosolvent treatment: implications for availability and fate. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2008;27(1):112-118. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Cheng XK, Kan AT, Tomson MB. Uptake and sequestration of naphthalene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene by C60. Journal of Nanoparticle Research 2005;7(4-5):555-567. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Cheng X, Kan AT, Tomson MB. Naphthalene adsorption and desorption from aqueous C60 fullerene. Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data 2004;49(3):675-683. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Cheng X, Kan AT, Tomson MB. Study of C60 transport in porous media and the effect of sorbed C60 on naphthalene transport. Journal of Materials Research 2005;20(12):3244-3254. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Gao Y, Kan AT, Tomson MB. Critical evaluation of desorption phenomena of heavy metals from natural sediments. Environmental Science & Technology 2003;37(24):5566-5573. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Gao Y, Wahi R, Kan AT, Falkner JC, Colvin VL, Tomson MB. Adsorption of cadmium on anatase nanoparticles-effect of crystal size and pH. Langmuir 2004;20(22):9585-9593. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Gao Y, Kan AT, Tomson MB. Response to comment on "Critical evaluation of desorption phenomena of heavy metals from natural sediments". Environmental Science & Technology 2004;38(17):4703. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Gomez-Hermosillo C, Pardue JH, Reible DD. Wetland plant uptake of desorption-resistant organic compounds from sediments. Environmental Science & Technology 2006;40(10):3229-3236. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Gust KA, Fleeger JW. Exposure-related effects on Cd bioaccumulation explain toxicity of Cd–phenanthrene mixtures in Hyalella azteca. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2005;24(11):2918-2926. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Gust KA. Joint toxicity of cadmium and phenanthrene in the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 2006;50(1):7-13. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Gust KA, Fleeger JW. Exposure to cadmium–phenanthrene mixtures elicits complex toxic responses in the freshwater tubificid oligochaete, Ilyodrilus templetoni. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 2006;51(1):54-60. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Himmelheber DW, Pennell KD, Hughes JB. Natural attenuation processes during in situ capping. Environmental Science & Technology 2007;41(15):5306-5313. R828773 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Kan AT, Fu G, Tomson MB. Effect of methanol on carbonate equilibrium and calcite solubility in a gas/methanol/water/salt mixed system. Langmuir 2002;18(25):9713-9725. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Kan AT, Fu G, Tomson MB. Effect of methanol and ethylene glycol on sulfates and halite scale formation. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2003;42(11):2399-2408. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Kan AT, Fu G, Tomson MB, Al-Thubaiti M, Xiao AJ. Factors affecting scale inhibitor retention in carbonate-rich formation during squeeze treatment. SPE Journal 2004;9(3):280-289. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Kan AT, Fu G, Tomson MB. Adsorption and precipitation of an aminoalkylphosphonate onto calcite. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 2005;281(2):275-284. R828773 (2004)
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  • Journal Article Kassenga GR, Pardue JH, Blair S, Ferraro T. Treatment of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in upflow wetland mesocosms. Ecological Engineering 2003;19(5):305-323. R828773C003 (2002)
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    Journal Article Kassenga GR, Pardue JH. Effect of competitive terminal electron acceptor processes on dechlorination of cis-1,2-dichloroethene and 1,2-dichloroethane in constructed wetland soils. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 2006;57(2):311-323. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Wiley-Full Text HTML
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  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
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  • Other: Wiley-Full Text PDF
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  • Journal Article Kassenga G, Pardue JH, Moe WM, Bowman KS. Hydrogen thresholds as indicators of dehalorespiration in constructed treatment wetlands. Environmental Science & Technology 2004;38(4):1024-1030. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C003 (2003)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: ACS-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Lee S, Pardue JH, Moe WM, Valsaraj KT. Mineralization of desorption-resistant 1,4-dichlorobenzene in wetland soils. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2003;22(10):2312-2322. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C003 (2003)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Lu X, Reible DD, Fleeger JW, Chai Y. Bioavailability of desorption-resistant phenanthrene to the oligochaete Ilyodrilus templetoni. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2003;22(1):153-160. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C001 (2002)
    R828773C001 (2003)
    R828773C001 (2004)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Lu X, Reible DD. Linking sediment exposure with effects:modeling techniques, organic availability and uptake. International Journal of Sediment Research 2003;18(2):208-213. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    not available
    Journal Article Lu X, Reible DD, Fleeger JW. Relative importance of ingested sediment versus pore water as uptake routes for PAHs to the deposit-feeding oligochaete Ilyodrilus templetoni. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 2004;47(2):207-214. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C001 (2003)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Springer-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Lu X, Reible DD, Fleeger JW. Bioavailability and assimilation of sediment-associated benzo[a]pyrene by Ilyodrilus templetoni (oligochaeta). Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2004;23(1):57-64. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C001 (2003)
    R828773C001 (2004)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Lu X, Reible DD, Fleeger JW. Bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in field-contaminated Anacostia River (Washington, DC) sediment. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2006;25(11):2869-2874. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article McDonough KM, Murphy P, Olsta J, Zhu Y, Reible D, Lowry GV. Development and placement of a sorbent-amended thin layer sediment cap in the Anacostia River. Soil & Sediment Contamination 2007;16(3):313-322. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract: Taylor&Francis-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Murphy P, Marquette A, Reible D, Lowry GV. Predicting the performance of activated carbon-, coke-, and soil-amended thin layer sediment caps. Journal of Environmental Engineering-ASCE 2006;132(7):787-794. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract: ASCE-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Pandoe WW, Edge BL. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, study cases for quarter annular and idealized ship channel problems. Ocean Engineering 2003;30(9):1117-1135. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C002 (2002)
    R828773C002 (2003)
    R828773C002 (2004)
  • Full-text: ResearchGate-Abstract & Full Text PDF
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Pandoe WW, Edge BL. Cohesive sediment transport in the 3D-hydrodynamic-baroclinic circulation model: study case for idealized tidal inlet. Ocean Engineering 2004;31(17-18):2227-2252. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C002 (2004)
  • Full-text: ResearchGate-Abstract and Full Text PDF
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Priklonsky VI, Reible DD, Tyler JM. Consistent unconfined contaminated disposal facilities dike tidal flow and transport model. Environmental Modelling & Software 2005;20(9):1071-1079. R828773 (Final)
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect-Full Text HTML
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect-Abstract
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  • Other: ScienceDirect-Full Text PDF
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  • Journal Article Ravikrishna R, Valsaraj KT, Thibodeaux LJ, Reible DD. Effects of oil and grease on the vaporization of organic compounds from contaminated sediments. Environmental Engineering Science 2002;19(2):101-113. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract: Liebert-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Reible DD, Garcia M. Contaminant processes in sediment. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Sedimentation Manual. R828773C001 (2002)
    R828773C001 (2003)
    not available
    Journal Article Reible D, Mohanty S. A levy flight-random walk model for bioturbation. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2002;21(4):875-881. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C001 (2002)
    R828773C001 (2003)
    R828773C001 (2004)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Reible D, Hayes D, Lue-Hing C, Patterson J, Bhowmik N, Johnson M, Teal J. Comparison of the long-term risks of removal and in situ management of contaminated sediments in the Fox River. Soil & Sediment Contamination 2003;12(3):325-344. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract: Taylor&Francis-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Reible D, Lampert D, Constant D, Mutch Jr. RD, Zhu YW. Active capping demonstration in the Anacostia River, Washington, DC. Remediation Journal 2006;17(1):39-53. R828773 (Final)
  • Full-text: ResearchGate-Abstract & Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Sanchez FF, Thibodeaux LJ, Valsaraj KT, Reible DD. Multimedia chemical fate model for environmental dredging. Practice Periodical of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Management 2002;6(2):120-128. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract: ASCE-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Tarabara VV, Wiesner MR. Effect of collision efficiency on the evolution of the surface of diffusion-limited deposits. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 2001;237(1):150-151. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C002 (2003)
    R826694C620 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect-Full Text PDF
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Tarabara VV, Pierrisnard F, Parron C, Bottero J-Y, Wiesner MR. Morphology of deposits formed from chemically heterogeneous suspensions: application to membrane filtration. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 2002;256(2):367-377. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C002 (2002)
    R828773C002 (2003)
    R828773C002 (2004)
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect-Full Text PDF
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Tarabara VV, Hovinga RM, Wiesner MR. Constant transmembrane pressure vs. constant permeate flux: effect of particle size on crossflow membrane filtration. Environmental Engineering Science 2002;19(6):343-355. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C002 (2004)
  • Abstract: Liebert-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Tarabara VV, Wiesner MR. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of the flow in a laboratory membrane filtration cell operated at low recoveries. Chemical Engineering Science 2003;58(1):239-246. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C002 (2004)
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect-Full Text HTML
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect-Abstract
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  • Other: ScienceDirect-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Tarabara VV, Koyuncu I, Wiesner MR. Effect of hydrodynamics and solution ionic strength on permeate flux in cross-flow filtration: direct experimental observation of filter cake cross-sections. Journal of Membrane Science 2004;241(1):65-78. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C002 (2004)
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect-Full Text HTML
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  • Abstract: ScienceDirect-Abstract
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  • Other: ScienceDirect-Full Text PDF
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  • Journal Article Tarabara VV, Wiesner MR. Physical and transport properties of bentonite-cement composites: a new material for in situ capping of contaminated underwater sediments. Environmental Engineering Science 2005;22(5):578-590. R828773C002 (2004)
  • Abstract: Liebert Online Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: Liebert Online PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Thibodeaux LJ, Valsaraj KT, Reible DD. Bioturbation-driven transport of hydrophobic organic contaminants from bed sediment. Environmental Engineering Science 2001;18(4):215-223. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C001 (2002)
    R828773C001 (2003)
    R828773C001 (2004)
    R825513C011 (Final)
  • Abstract: Liebert-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Thibodeaux LJ, Huls H, Ravikrishna R, Valsaraj KT, Costello M, Reible DD. Laboratory simulation of chemical evaporation from dredge-produced sediment slurries. Environmental Engineering Science 2004;21(6):730-740. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract: Liebert-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Tomson MB, Fu G, Watson MA, Kan AT. Mechanisms of mineral scale inhibition. SPE Production & Facilities 2003;18(3):192-199. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C004 (2004)
  • Full-text: Rice-PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: OnePetro-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Tomson MB, Kan AT, Fu G. Inhibition of barite scale in the presence of hydrate inhibitors. SPE Journal 2005;10(3):256-266. R828773 (Final)
    R831718 (2005)
  • Abstract: OnePetro-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Tomson MB, Kan AT, Fu G, Al-Thubaiti M, Shen D, Shipley HJ. Scale formation and prevention in the presence of hydrate inhibitors. SPE Journal 2006;11(2):248-258. R828773 (Final)
    R831718 (Final)
  • Full-text: RiceUniversity-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: OnePetro-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Tomson MB, Kan AT, Fu G, Cong L. Measurement of total alkalinity and carboxylic acid and their relation to scaling and corrosion. SPE Journal 2006;11(1):103-110. R828773 (Final)
    R831718 (2005)
    R831718 (Final)
  • Abstract: OnePetro-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Tomson MB, Kan AT, Fu G. Control of inhibitor squeeze through mechanistic understanding of inhibitor chemistry. SPE Journal 2006;11(3):283-293. R828773 (Final)
    R831718 (2005)
    R831718 (Final)
  • Abstract: OnePetro-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Weimer ML, Constant WD. Hygro-Mole: a logging tool for determining moisture content in environmentally sensitive subsurface zones. Journal of Energy Resources Technology 2006;128(1):44-48. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract: ASME-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Work PA, Moore PR, Reible DD. Bioturbation, advection, and diffusion of a conserved tracer in a laboratory flume. Water Resources Research 2002;38(6):24-1–24-9. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R828773C001 (2003)
    R828773C001 (2004)
  • Full-text: Wiley - Full Text HTML
    Exit
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: Wiley - Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Yan L, Thompson KE, Valsaraj KT, Reible DD. In-situ control of DNAPL density using polyaphrons. Environmental Science & Technology 2003;37(19):4487-4493. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: ACS-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Yang W, Duan L, Zhang N, Zhang C, Shipley HJ, Kan AT, Tomson MB, Chen W. Resistant desorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants in typical Chinese soils: implications for long-term fate and soil quality standards. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2008;27(1):235-242. R828773 (Final)
    R831718 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Yavuz CT, Mayo JT, Yu WW, Prakash A, Falkner JC, Yean S, Cong L, Shipley HJ, Kan A, Tomson M, Natelson D, Colvin VL. Low-field magnetic separation of monodisperse Fe3O4 nanocrystals. Science 2006;314(5801):964-967. R828773 (Final)
    R831718 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Rice University-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: Science-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Yean S, Cong L, Yavuz CT, Mayo JT, Yu WW, Kan AT, Colvin VL, Tomson MB. Effect of magnetite particle size on adsorption and desorption of arsenite and arsenate. Journal of Materials Research 2005;20(12):3255-3264. R828773 (2004)
    R828773 (Final)
    R831718 (2005)
    R831718 (Final)
  • Full-text: Rice University-Full Text PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: MRS-Abstract
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  • Journal Article Yuan Q, Valsaraj KT, Reible DD, Willson CS. A laboratory study of sediment and contaminant release during gas ebullition. Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 2007;57(9):1103-1111. R828773 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Taylor&Francis-Full Text PDF
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  • Abstract: Taylor&Francis-Abstract
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  • Supplemental Keywords:

    TOSC, TAB, sequestration, bioaccessibility, dredging and dredged materials, plant-based remediation, capping, hurricane,, RFA, Scientific Discipline, Geographic Area, Waste, Water, Contaminated Sediments, Environmental Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Hazardous Waste, Ecological Risk Assessment, Hazardous, Environmental Engineering, EPA Region, hazardous waste treatment, region 4, fate and transport , in situ remediation, bioavailability, biodegradation, contaminated sediment, contaminated soil, treatment, Region 6, contaminant management, phytoremediation

    Relevant Websites:

    http://www.hsrc.org Exit
    http://www.sediments.org Exit

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2003 Progress Report
  • 2004 Progress Report
  • 2005
  • 2006
  • Final Report
  • Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R828773C001 Bioturbation and Bioavailability of Residual, Desorption-Resistant Contaminants
    R828773C002 In-Situ Containment and Treatment of Contaminated Sediments: Engineering Cap Integrity and Reactivity
    R828773C003 Phytoremediation in Wetlands and CDFs
    R828773C004 Contaminant Release During Removal and Resuspension
    R828773C005 HSRC Technology Transfer, Training, and Outreach