Latex Antigen Levels During Powdered and Powderless Glove Use

EPA Grant Number: R825702C011
Subproject: this is subproject number 011 , established and managed by the Center Director under grant R825702
(EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).

Center: Environmental Lung Disease Center (National Jewish Medical and Research Center)
Center Director: Mason, Robert J.
Title: Latex Antigen Levels During Powdered and Powderless Glove Use
Investigators: Balkissoon, Ron , Westcott, Jay
Institution: National Jewish Medical and Research Center
EPA Project Officer: Chung, Serena
Project Period: February 16, 1998 through February 28, 2003 (Extended to February 28, 2004)
RFA: Environmental Lung Disease Center (National Jewish Medical and Research Center) (1998) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Targeted Research

Objective:

Latex has become one of the most common causes of occupational/environmental allergy. Natural rubber latex is ubiquitous in the environment, found in medical supplies such as gloves, iv tubing, catheters, and non medical products such as condoms, balloons, toys and tires. Latex from rubber tires has also been postulated as a major source of environmental exposure in urban air pollution. Such particles could conceivably be partially responsible for the increase in latex sensitization as well as the respiratory morbidity associated with urban air pollution. Several major gaps in our knowledge have limited progress in both the prevention of latex hypersensitivity and in conducting exposure-based and bench research on latex immunopathology. Specifically, at this time there are limited methods for quantitatively measuring environmental latex antigen. We cannot define thresholds of exposure for purposes of guiding industrial hygiene surveillance practices or setting public policy with regard to safe latex antigen exposure levels to prevent sensitization. In order to make further medical progress in the assessment and prevention of environmentally relevant latex exposure and to advance research on latex hypersensitivity and asthma, new, reliable and valid techniques are needed for the detection of latex antigen in the environment. In this proposal, we link our expertise in industrial hygiene latex aerosol exposure assessment and immunoassay development in order to evaluate the effectiveness of a new more sensitive immunoassay technique to quantify latex antigen levels from air samples compared to current available techniques.

Supplemental Keywords:

Health, Scientific Discipline, Health Risk Assessment, Risk Assessments, Allergens/Asthma, Biochemistry, Biology, urban air, immunoassay, morbidity, latex, exposure, powder, respiratory morbidity, human exposure, gloves, occupational allergen, antigen, industrial hygiene, rubber tires, allergic response

Progress and Final Reports:

  • 1998
  • 1999
  • 2000
  • 2001
  • 2002
  • 2003
  • Final

  • Main Center Abstract and Reports:

    R825702    Environmental Lung Disease Center (National Jewish Medical and Research Center)

    Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R825702C001 SP-A and SP-D in Environmental Lung Disease
    R825702C003 Adaptation to Nitrogen Dioxide: Role of Altered Glycolytic Pathway Enzyme Expression and NF-κB-Dependent Cellular Defenses Against Apoptosis
    R825702C005 Inhalation of Particulate Matter Alters the Allergic Airway Response to Inhaled Allergen
    R825702C006 Particle-Induced Lung Inflammation and Extracellular EC-SOD
    R825702C007 Indoor-Outdoor Relationships of Airborne Particle Count and Endotoxin Concentrations
    R825702C008 The Role of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Oxidant-Mediated Lung Injury
    R825702C009 Immunopathogenesis of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis in the Mouse
    R825702C010 Activation of Natural T Lymphocytes by Diesel Exhaust Particulates Leads to Their Production of Interleukin-4 and TH2 Lymphocyte Differentiation to Allergen
    R825702C011 Latex Antigen Levels During Powdered and Powderless Glove Use
    R825702C012 Adjuvant Effects of Ozone in a Model of Allergen-Induced Airway Inflammation and Hyperresponsiveness
    R825702C013 Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution in Childhood Asthma
    R825702C014 Mechanisms of Ozone Toxicity to the Lung