Final Report: Children's Environmental Health & Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth

EPA Grant Number: R835442
Center: Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Center - Dartmouth College 2013
Center Director: Karagas, Margaret Rita
Title: Children's Environmental Health & Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth
Investigators: Karagas, Margaret Rita , Cottingham, Kathryn L. , Gilbert-Diamond, Diane , Korrick, Susan A. , Madan, Juliette , Marsit, Carmen J. , Moeschler, John B. , Murray, Carolyn
Institution: Dartmouth College
EPA Project Officer: Hahn, Intaek
Project Period: July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2018 (Extended to June 30, 2019)
Project Amount: $4,060,713
RFA: Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (with NIEHS) (2012) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: Children's Health , Health

Objective:

The main goal of this Center is to fill critical knowledge gaps in the role of arsenic (As) in drinking water and food to child growth, development and immune response. Project 1 builds on a cohort study of pregnant women using private wells with elevated arsenic levels and their children will be evaluated for occurrence of infections, allergies/atopy and vaccine response. Project 2 investigates the contribution of drinking water and diet to early childhood arsenic (As) exposure. Project 3 examinesepigenetic/gene expression changes in the placenta from As exposure and children's health outcomes.

Project 1: Childhood immune response and exposure

The primary aims of project 1 were to test the hypothesis that in utero and early life arsenic (As) and other exposures are related to increased occurrence of childhood: 1) infections (number, type and severity of infections), in particular respiratory infections, in the first 5 years of life; 2) allergy and atopy in the first 5 years of life; and 3) diminished vaccine response (to Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis, Pneumococcus and Polio) at age one. The secondary aim was to investigate the relation between in utero and early life As exposure on the development of the infant intestinal microbiome in the first year of life (based on stool samples taken at 6 weeks and 12 months of age). We hypothesized that As exposure will be associated with decreased diversity of the microbiome (e.g., based on the Simpson Diversity Index (SDI)), and differences in the relative abundance of specific phylotypes (e.g., bacterial genera and species) and/or predominant gene families or metabolic pathways.

Project 2: Water and dietary arsenic exposure related to early growth and neurodevelopment

The project aims were to: 1) To estimate arsenic (As) and other exposures from food and water ingestion and to relate these intakes to biomarkers of exposure during the first five years of life, a period of rapidly changing diet for most children; 2) To quantify the association of biomarkers of early life exposures with physical growth patterns during the first five years of life; and 3) To quantify the association of biomarkers of early life exposures with neurodevelopment during the first five years of life.

Project 3: Placental biomarkers of exposure and outcome

The project aims were to: 1) To identify regions of variable DNA methylation in the placenta associated with in utero exposure to As by examining the methylation status of relevant candidate genes and regions using quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing and using genome-wide DNA methylation arrays and biomarker-based exposure assessment; 2) To identify altered gene expression in the placenta associated with in utero exposure to As by testing the expression of relevant candidate genes, including those identified in Aim 1, and their association with biomarker-based As exposure; 3) To examine if the As-associated variable DNA methylation and altered gene expression in placenta prospectively relates to child weight growth, infection, and neurodevelopmental outcomes.

The Community Outreach and Translation Core (COTC), a central component of the Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth, seeks to prevent adverse child health outcomes resulting from environmental exposures by facilitating the translation and communication of the Center’s research to key stakeholders. The aims remain the same: 1) To oversee the development of resources to effectively disseminate the Center’s research findings to key children’s health decision makers: parents, medical care providers, local government and policy makers; 2) To effectively communicate well water arsenic test results to pregnant women; 3) To develop primary care practice-based approaches to increase private well testing; 4) To incorporate well water testing recommendations and arsenic information into a regional community health organization’s outreach initiative.

The original, unaltered aims of Core A were to provide central coordination and oversight for the Center and advance all administrative, communication, regulatory, budgetary, training, mentoring and career development activities, including: 1) Plan, implement and evaluate education, training, mentoring and career development activities of junior investigators and recruitment of new faculty members to the Center; 2) Support the Child Health Specialist and Assistant Health Specialist to create and maintain meaningful interactions to reduce adverse child health outcomes related to environmental exposures and to assure success of this Center; 3) Ensure integration of Center activities and effective use of state-of-the-art institutional resources and shared databases; and 4) Coordinate Center communications, fiscal, compliance, reporting and overall center evaluation and perform administrative functions.

Summary/Accomplishments (Outputs/Outcomes):

Overall:

The researchers of the Center found novel relationships between fetal and maternal exposures to arsenic and susceptibility to infection/allergy, distinct characteristics of the both the placenta and maternal and infant gut microbiota. When infants were exposed to arsenic during pregnancy increased risk of both infant wheezing and infection requiring a physician visit during the first year of life was found. Additional analyses further found that feeding mode (breast versus formula feeding) and delivery type (vaginal versus C-section) have an impact on the infant gut microbiota. Throughout the project, the Center's researchers further advanced the understanding of dietary sources and routes of exposure to arsenic through water, rice and other foods and contributed to several reports on this subject, including the State of New Hampshire's Department of Environmental ServicesReview of the Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) and Ambient Groundwater Quality Standard (AGQS) for Arsenic. The report was instrumental in NH Governor Chris Sununu's decision to sign HB261 to lower the MCL for arsenic in public drinking water systems from 10 parts per billion (ppb) to 5 ppb. With the signing of this bill, NH has become the second state in the nation to lower the MCL for arsenic in public drinking water. The Center's Community Outreach and Translation Core developed a successful partnership with the Dartmouth CO-OP Primary Care Practice Based Research Network and the New Hampshire State Lab to promote water use screening and testing.

OurCenter's research and core activities throughout the project period built on the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study in rural New England. To be eligible pregnant women need to be: 1) 18-45 years old, 2) receiving routine prenatal care at one of the study clinics, 3) consuming drinking water at their place of residence from a private well (defined as a well serving fewer than 15 households or 25 individuals), 4) residing in the same place of residence since their last menstrual period, using the same water supply, and not planning to move prior to delivery. Enrollment is limited to singleton pregnancies. The parent cohort study was funded to recruit approximately 2,000 maternal-newborn pairs (NIEHS P42 ES007373: Project PL: Karagas) and obtain information through pregnancy.

As part of our Children's Center we expanded the collection and processing of delivery samples ncluding the ongoing collection of placenta tissue (utilized in Project 3), in addition to cord blood and newborn stool. This required strong cooperation of the clinic staff and has proven successful (about 85% of placenta samples, 80% of cord blood and 80% of stool have been obtained). We also began collecting more detailed information about maternal diet including rice intake as a potential source of arsenic and other metals on the three-day diary that accompanies the urine collection (utilized in Project 2). We extended our medical record abstraction to include maternal infection during pregnancy, maternal infections at delivery, and newborn infections (utilized in Project 1).

Our Children's Center allows us to follow children in our cohort and to collect, process and archive samples from them. To obtain allergy, atopy and infection information, we re-contact caregivers every four months in the child's first year, biannually in the second year and annually thereafter to ask about their child's recent infant infections, including acute respiratory infections, gastrointestinal symptoms and fever (see Project 1). Questions regarding atopic disorders (i.e., food or aeroallergies and eczema) are also included in this assessment. The interval questionnaire further includes questions about general dietary patterns (breast versus formula feeding), changes in water supply, and daycare attendance. Pediatric medical records reviews are done to update the child's growth, diagnoses, medications and vaccination history (see Projects 1 and 2 descriptions below).

As of June 2019, we have screened 12,220 women at 12-16 weeks gestation, of whom 2,855 were potentially eligible. Over 2,105 women were enrolled at the 24-28 week visit (an approximately 75% response rate). Over 8,958 prenatal samples already have been collected, processed and aliquoted (e.g., water, maternal urine, hair, and toenails) as well as over 13,353 delivery/postpartum samples (cord blood, meconium, placenta biopsies, infant and maternal toenails). Additionally, information has been abstracted from prenatal medical records, maternal and infant delivery medical records. To date, over 9,405 interval telephone interviews have been completed. Of the first ~2,000 water samples tested, arsenic concentrations ranged from < 1ug/L to nearly 200 ug/L, with roughly 10% of the samples exceeding the MCL of 10 ug/L. Maternal urinary arsenic concentrations ranged from <1 ug/L to close to 300 ug/L. Thus, we have successfully established a complex and rich epidemiologic resource for investigating early life exposures and their subsequent health consequences.

Our Center's work has helped risk assessors, regulators, policy makers, caregivers, and other stakeholders to implement immediate and long-term strategies to prevent environmentally-induced diseases in children. Results from our Center were highlighted in the NIEHS/EPA Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers Impact Report, progress reports and interim updates.

Within the project period, none of the projects or cores of our center have encountered any problems, adverse conditions, delays, or changed the scope or mission of our center, cores or projects. We have not experienced any changes in key personnel or Center management, nor did experience any costs which were higher or lower than originally estimated in our proposal. Our Center's standard operating procedures for data collection, laboratory operation, and other quality assurance procedures for key aspects of the Center's project research are well established and in place for all projects.

Summary of Findings fromProject 1:

Prospectively collected data on clinical markers of immunity function, including childhood infections, allergy and atopy up to age 5 years, blood at age one for antibodies to infant vaccinations, and repeated stool samples to characterize the developing gut microbiome. We have related these outcomes with multiple routes of As exposure (i.e., via water, food) using biomarker measurements (i.e., during pregnancy and early childhood via urine and toenails) in collaboration with Project 2, and biologic, mechanistic changes (e.g., placental epigenetics, gene expression profiles) in collaboration with Project 3. We completed our analyses of the relationship between in utero arsenic exposure and an increased risk of both infant wheezing and infection requiring a physician visit during the first year of life. We furthered our collaborative work on dietary exposure to arsenic reporting rice and rice product consumption as a common route of exposure in the first year of life. We also completed our analysis of pre- and post-natal arsenic exposure in relation to the infant 6-week gut microbiome. Additionally, preliminary analyses of untargeted metabolomics data from infant stool samples in collaboration with the NIH Eastern Regional Comprehensive Metabolomics Resource Core (obtained through PA-15-030) revealed distinct clustering by feeding mode (breast versus formula feeding) and delivery type (vaginal versus C-section). Analysis of arsenic exposure in relation to fetal metabolomic profiles as a reflection of the function of microbes present in the infant gut is being conducted.

Major Activities. Throughout the project period, our project built off the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study, a longitudinal study of over 2,000 maternal-infant pairs that has collected a wealth of data. These include: maternal health, diet and lifestyle factors, samples of household tap water, maternal blood, urine and toenails (at 24-28 weeks gestation), cord blood and placenta, infant meconium, nails, urine and stool, and maternal toenails at 2 weeks postpartum. Additionally, we have conducted a structured review of prenatal and delivery records. During the formative phase of our project, we began collecting more detailed information on maternal and newborn infections and allergies through a review of the medical records, and initiated an interval telephone interview for updated infection allergy/atopy information from the child's caregiver over the first year of life. As part of our full Center's project, after refining our protocols and study instruments, we continue this follow-up—both through a review of pediatric records in collaboration with Project 2, and the interval telephone interviews at 18, 24, 30, 36, 42, and 50 months. Through a R21 grant in collaboration with Dr. Kari Nadeau of the Berkeley/Stanford Children's Center, we conducted a pilot study to establish a protocol for collecting blood samples from our cohort members at one year of age to test for vaccine response. Another focus of our work was to investigate novel biomarkers of immune function and response. This included microbiome analysis of infant stool samples beginning at birth and through the first year of life.

Specific Objectives. Infectious diseases remain the leading cause of illness in children in the US, and of mortality in children worldwide. Additionally, the prevalence of allergy and atopic diseases have become more widespread among children in recent years, for reasons that are not fully understood. Therefore, our objectives are to assess the relation of environmentally relevant levels of As (and other exposures) with clinical and biologic measures of early childhood immune function (e.g., infection/allergy/atopy, vaccine response and intestinal microbial acquisition). To achieve our objectives, we leveraged an ongoing US prospective study of women and infants enrolled during pregnancy who are residents of New Hampshire and who obtain household water from private wells, a potential source of arsenic exposure in the region. Understanding whether common levels of exposure during the vulnerable periods of fetal development and early childhood impact immune response have widespread implications for public health and practice change.

Significant Findings.We completed analyses of the first year of life of infants in the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study, including on the relationship betweenin uteroarsenic exposure and an increased risk of both infant wheezing and infection requiring a physician visit or a prescription medicine. We furthered our collaborative work on dietary exposure to arsenic reporting rice and rice product consumption as well as other solid foods as routes of exposure for infants transitioning to solid food (Signes-Pastor et al., 2018). We also completed our analysis of pre- and post-natal arsenic exposure in relation to the infant 6 week gut microbiome (Hoen et al., 2018).

Key Outcomes and Other Achievements. Project 1's wealth of resources grew with data collected through our interval surveys and collected biological samples. These resources allowed us to further explore the role of dietary exposures, incidence of infection and possible mediating effects of the maternal and infant microbiota on maternal and infant health in the perinatal period and early childhood. Throughout the project period, we engaged physicians in this research to promote and expedite translation of our findings to the clinical setting and community. We also collaborated with a pilot study on exposure to arsenic via seaweeds (Taylor et al, 2017) and explored untargeted metabolomics data from infant stool samples to examine possible differences in in the infant microbiome due to feeding mode (breastfeeding versus formula feeding), delivery type (vaginal versus C-section) and metal exposure.

Summary of Findings from Project 2:

Project 2 completed extensive data collection, with data analysis and synthesis underway. For aim 1, assessment of dietary exposure to arsenic during the first year of life continued using the approaches previously developed in the P20 phase and new approaches were piloted and introduced at ages 3 and 5. We collected a food-frequency questionnaire and toenail samples from over 700 three-year oldsand a food frequency questionnaire, recent dietary history, and urine sample from over 500 five-year olds. For Aim 2, we assessed physical growth of children ages birth—5 years using medical record reviews (in collaboration with Project 1) and performed in-person growth assessments on over 500 children 5 years of age. For Aim 3, we performed neurodevelopmental assessments using mailed standardized behavioral assessments for more than 700 children at age 3 (the Social Responsive Scale, 2ndedition [SRS-2] and the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd edition [BASC-2]) and more detailed, in-person assessments of over 500 children at age 5 years (the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 4th edition [WPPSI-IV], the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition [BOT-2], and parent completed BASC-2 and SRS-2 instruments).

Our findings have made important contributions to understanding the impact of diet, particularly during infancy and early childhood, on the risk of early life exposure to arsenic. These results have been directly applicable to efforts to improve food safety for children. In addition, we are finding potential associations between early life arsenic exposures and some of our health outcomes. Confirmation and expansion of these findings will be critical to understanding the child health risks of arsenic at the low-level exposures that are prevalent in many populations.

Summary of Findings from Project 3:

Project 3 has been successful and productive in its analyses focused on epigenetic and gene expression variation in placenta tissue collected from the NHBCS participants and relating that variation both to prenatal exposures and newborn health outcomes. Over the course of the award, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on nearly 350 placenta samples using the Illumina 450K array, as well as gene expression assays utilizing Nanostring, and targeted DNA methylation studies using pyrosequencing. Additionally, through Dr. Marsit's (project leader) independent funding, companion data from his Rhode Island Child Health Study has become available in parallel to the NHBCS, allowing for increased rigor in our analyses through meta-analytic and replication approaches. The planned laboratory assays and analyses have been completed, and the data created through this research has been made available through the NCBI GEO archive (Accession: GSE71678.)

Major Activities.In the original project application, we proposed to examine a panel of candidate genes for their DNA methylation status and their expression, and we have worked to design, validate, and implement pyrosequencing assays and a nanostring panel for a number of these genes. We also proposed and have undertaken genome-wide analyses of DNA methylation using selected samples from the New Hampshire cohort, and have completed a series of analyses on the resulting data.

Specific Objectives. This project is compelled by the hypothesis that environmental exposures encountered by a pregnant woman impact the gene expression of the infant's placenta via epigenetic and other mechanisms and these functional alterations are associated with developmental outcomes in the children. Our objectives are to identify epigenetic and gene expression alterations in the placenta associated with maternal and infant biomarkers ofin uteroarsenic exposure, and to examine how these alterations are associated with critical health outcomes in the first few years of life. To accomplish these objectives, we are utilizing the existing and growing resources of the ongoing New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study and are thus translating key findings from basic research into human populations.

Significant Findings.Throughout the course of this project, we have developed the largest dataset of placental genome-scale DNA methylation data and have been able to make use of that data in a variety of analyses to better understand the impact of arsenic and other trace contaminants on the functional epigenome of the placenta. Through these analyses, and making use of Dr. Marsit's RI Child Health Study, we have been able to identify altered placental DNA methylation associated with exposure to arsenic (Green, et al EHP 2016), tobacco smoking (Maccani et al Epigenomics 2013), mercury (Maccani et al, EHP 2015), manganese (Maccani et al, Reprod Toxicol 2015), air pollution (Kingsley et al Envir Int 2016), cadmium (Everson, et al. EHP 2018), occupational circadian disruption (Clarkson-Townsend et al, PLoS One 2018), and copper (Kennedy, et al, Epigenetics 2019). We have also linked altered DNA methylation in the placenta to a variety of early life health outcomes including birth weight and neurobehavioral performance. In addition to this applied research linking exposure to altered placental epigenetic patterning and early life outcomes, Dr. Marsit and his team have made seminal contributions to the methodologies used in the analyses of DNA methylation in human studies, including methods to examine cell composition effects in analyses on tissues, such as placenta, where no reference data sets are available (Houseman et al, BMC Bioinformatics 2016).

In additional targeted analyses, Dr. Robbins and his team examined the expression of 29 genes that regulate the signaling pathways that drive early development. These analyses highlighted two genes whose expression is associated with U-As levels. Interestingly, we noted that further stratification based on the sex of the fetus led to the identification of additional genes whose expression was associated with U-As. These results suggested that the expression of a number of the drivers of early human development is modified by arsenic exposure in a sexually dimorphic way. When we extended these findings to the analysis of infant birth weight, we noted that the U-As associated gene,GLI3, was also associated with birth weight in female placentae, suggesting that it may be a key signaling node mediating arsenic's effects on fetal growth (Winterbottom et al, 2015). Along these same lines, examining a panel of epigenetic regulators, which may be important for establishing the patterning of DNA methylation described above, are also altered by exposure to arsenic during development and that this variation is also differential by sex (Winterbottom et al 2019). This provides intriguing evidence to explain the often observed sexual dimorphism in the health effects of arsenic and other toxic exposures.

Summary of Findings from the Community Outreach and Translation Core:

The Dartmouth COTC has developed relationships and actively engaged with key children's environmental health stakeholders, both regionally and nationally. Regionally, our collaborative relationship with the Dartmouth CO-OP Primary Care Practice Based Research Network provided us with outreach capabilities to 200 clinical sites in New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine serving primarily rural residents, many of whom rely on private water systems for drinking water. We partnered with state health departments in NH and VT to create well water testing information designed for dissemination in clinical settings. We delivered educational presentations to clinicians in this primary care network regarding the public health vulnerability of populations reliant on private unregulated water systems. We completed an intervention study comparing different methods of integrating well water testing promotion into pediatric primary care and continue to facilitate the provision of well water testing kits in regional primary care clinics. The manuscript of this study is currently under review. We continue to provide continuing medical education offerings to clinicians within our region regarding pediatric environmental health issues and sharing results from the NH Birth Cohort Study.

Our partnership with our public health stakeholders in NH led to incorporation of arsenic and well water questions into the CDC sponsored PRAMS survey starting in 2013, which is administered annually to a representative sample of women in the state who have recently given birth, and allows for assessment of access to and quality of perinatal health services. We conducted the analyses of these data and are disseminating to NH obstetricians and nurse midwives. The recent legislation that led to NH reducing the MCL for arsenic in public water systems was informed by our Center's research and reflects the partnership we have developed with the NH Dept of Environmental Services.

Nationally we have collaborated with the COTC's of other Children's Centers in harnessing social media tools to disseminate key evidence-based information regarding children's environmental health for the public, in particular aiming to target pregnant women and parents. This has included developing platforms and content aligned with health literacy and social media standards. We also developed a web-based interactive infographic tool to explain sources of arsenic and pathways into food and water that has been incorporated into several educational websites.

Our national work has also included providing testimony and sharing our Center's research results to policy makers at the FDA, as well as to organizations such as the American Pediatric Association (APA), as well as in national meetings of public health and children's health professionals.

The work of the Core has helped risk assessors, regulators, policy makers, clinicians, parents, and other stakeholders to implement immediate and long-term strategies to prevent environmentally-induced diseases in children. Results from our Center were highlighted in the NIEHS/EPA Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers Impact Report.

Summary of Findings from the Administrative Core:

In the project period the Administrative, Career Development and Research Integration Core has provided support critical to completing the analyses of the Center's research projects and cores. Specifically, the Core has supported a study coordinators and data analyst to perform statistical analyses for the Center investigators. These positions have been critical to the successful completion of data analyses and have expedited and ensured the publication of manuscripts and completion of research and/or training aims and objectives.

Throughout the project period the Administrative, Career Development and Research Integration Core has provided support critical to completing the Center's research projects and cores, under the directorship of Dr. Margaret Karagas. Specifically, the Core has provided the support for a programmer/analyst in theInformatics Collaboratory for Design, Development, and Dissemination (ic3d.dartmouth.edu) and has facilitated the coordination and oversight of the state-of-the-art databases and shared resources. This support enabled the transition of the Center's existing data into a more usable data warehouse and ensured its integrity. The data platform provided efficient query, analysis, and reporting by Center investigators. Data entry systems, rigorous data quality checks for the questionnaires and biosamples collected as part of the Center were completed. We provided an application programming interface (API) that allows authorized systems or tools, such as REDCap, label printers, and barcode scanners to access selected system capabilities. Secure access to the database using tools such as R and SAS have been constructed for data analysis files. This support was crucial for Center project and core leaders, and trainees to complete their analyses, and helped to expedited publication of manuscripts and completion of research and/or training aims and objectives.

The Core further supported the leadership of the Center to ensure effective administrative oversight through active communication, strategic planning for ongoing sustainability, and compliance with all regulatory and fiscal requirements to support the goals of the Center. The Core provided support to the Center's Child Health Specialist, Dr. John Moeschler, who assured the success of the Center. Throughout the project period, Dr. Moeschler acted as a liaison to the Chair of the Department of Pediatrics and the Children's Hospital at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, to primary pediatric care providers, and leaders in local and regional health communities and agencies. He helped to coordinate translation efforts with other Center health care providers, representing the Center in national committees and organizations involved in health care delivery to children, as well as research, policy and regulation regarding children's environmental health, and participating in the COTC activities. Finally, one of our Center's top priorities was to promote the careers of new investigators, by identifying and fostering the success of talented early career scientists who are motivated to address critical issues in children's health. Our team of early career faculty and mentors was diverse with a high proportion of women and ethnic minorities.

In summary, we provided ongoing support for our dynamic Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center including for key Center members including our Faculty Development Investigator, a data manager/analyst, a COTC postdoctoral trainee, and travel to the Annual Meetings of the Children's Program, during the entire project period. This permitted the completion of statistical analyses, scientific presentations and publications of our Center's research on the sources and health impacts of common environmental exposures, such as arsenic and other exposures, on child health and development, and enhance translation of these findings to the public, medical community, regulators and policy makers. Thus, our Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center contributed to great strides in addressing environmental health issues facing children today and impacting their health throughout life.


Journal Articles: 131 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other center views: All 185 publications 131 publications in selected types All 131 journal articles
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Journal Article Appleton AA, Lester BM, Armstrong DA, Lesseur C, Marsit CJ. Examining the joint contribution of placental NR3C1 and HSD11B2 methylation for infant neurobehavior. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2015;52:32-42. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Armstrong DA, Lesseur C, Conradt E, Lester BM, Marsit CJ. Global and gene-specific DNA methylation across multiple tissues in early infancy: implications for children's health research. FASEB Journal 2014;28(5):2088-2097. R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Armstrong DA, Green BB, Blair BA, Guerin DJ, Litzky JF, Chavan NR, Pearson KJ, Marsit CJ. Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with mitochondrial DNA methylation. Environmental Epigenetics 2016;2(3):dvw020. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Banister CE, Koestler DC, Maccani MA, Padbury JF, Houseman EA, Marsit CJ. Infant growth restriction is associated with distinct patterns of DNA methylation in human placentas. Epigenetics 2011;6(7):920-927. R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Beane Freeman LE, Karagas MR, Baris D, Schwenn M, Johnson AT, Colt JS, Jackson B, Hosain GM, Cantor KP, Silverman DT. Is the inverse association between selenium and bladder cancer due to confounding by smoking? American Journal of Epidemiology 2015;181(7):488-495. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Bommarito PA, Martin E, Smeester L, Palys T, Baker ER, Karagas MR, Fry RC. Fetal-sex dependent genomic responses in the circulating lymphocytes of arsenic-exposed pregnant women in New Hampshire. Reproductive Toxicology 2017;73:184-195. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Breton CV, Marsit CJ, Faustman E, Nadeau K, Goodrich JM, Dolinoy DC, Herbstman J, Holland N, LaSalle JM, Schmidt R, Yousefi P, Perera F, Joubert BR, Wiemels J, Taylor M, Yang IV, Chen R, Hew KM, Freeland DM, Miller R, Murphy SK. Small-Magnitude Effect Sizes in Epigenetic End Points are Important in Children's Environmental Health Studies: The Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center's Epigenetics Working Group. Environmental Health Perspectives 2017;125(4):511-526. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Caito SW, Jackson BP, Punshon T, Scrimale T, Grier A, Gill SR, Love TM, Watson GE, van Wijngaarden E, Rand MD. Editor's Highlight: Variation in methylmercury metabolism and elimination status in humans following fish consumption. Toxicological Sciences 2018;161(2):443-453. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Cardenas A, Koestler DC, Houseman EA, Jackson BP, Kile ML, Karagas MR, Marsit CJ. Differential DNA methylation in umbilical cord blood of infants exposed to mercury and arsenic in utero. Epigenetics 2015;10(6):508-515. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Carignan CC, Cottingham KL, Jackson BP, Farzan SF, Gandolfi AJ, Punshon T, Folt CL, Karagas MR. Estimated exposure to arsenic in breastfed and formula-fed infants in a United States cohort. Environmental Health Perspectives 2015;123(5):500-506. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Chen Y, Karagas MR. Arsenic and cardiovascular disease: new evidence from the United States. Annals of Internal Medicine 2013;159(10):713-714. R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Chernikova DA, Koestler DC, Hoen AG, Housman ML, Hibberd PL, Moore JH, Morrison HG, Sogin ML, Zain-Ul-Abideen M, Madan JC. Fetal exposures and perinatal influences on the stool microbiota of premature infants. Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine 2016;29(1):99-105. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Chernikova DA, Madan JC, Housman ML, Zain-Ul-Abideen M, Lundgren SN, Morrison HG, Sogin ML, Williams SM, Moore JH, Karagas MR, Hoen AG. The premature infant gut microbiome during the first 6 weeks of life differs based on gestational maturity at birth. Pediatric Research 2018;84(1):71-79. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Cottingham KL, Karimi R, Gruber JF, Zens MS, Sayarath V, Folt CL, Punshon T, Morris JS, Karagas MR. Diet and toenail arsenic concentrations in a New Hampshire population with arsenic-containing water. Nutrition Journal 2013;12:149. R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Davis MA, Gilbert-Diamond D, Karagas MR, Li Z, Moore JH, Williams SM, Frost HR. A dietary-wide association study (DWAS) of environmental metal exposure in US children and adults. PLoS One 2014;9(9):e104768. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Davis MA, Li Z, Gilbert-Diamond D, Mackenzie TA, Cottingham KL, Jackson BP, Lee JS, Baker ER, Marsit CJ, Karagas MR. Infant toenails as a biomarker of in utero arsenic exposure. Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology 2014;24(5):467-473. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Davis MA, Higgins J, Li Z, Gilbert-Diamond D, Baker ER, Das A, Karagas MR. Preliminary analysis of in utero low-level arsenic exposure and fetal growth using biometric measurements extracted from fetal ultrasound reports. Environmental Health 2015;14:12 (11 pp.). R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Davis MA, Signes-Pastor AJ, Argos M, Slaughter F, Pendergrast C, Punshon T, Gossai A, Ahsan H, Karagas MR. Assessment of human dietary exposure to arsenic through rice. Science of the Total Environment 2017;586:1237-1244. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Demidenko E. Exact and approximate statistical inference for nonlinear regression and the estimating equation approach. Scandinavian Journal of Statistics 2017;44(3):636-665. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Emond JA, Gilbert-Diamond D, Tanski SE, Sargent JD. Energy drink consumption and the risk of alcohol use disorder among a national sample of adolescents and young adults. Journal of Pediatrics 2014;165(6):1194-1200. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Emond JA, Sargent JD, Gilbert-Diamond D. Patterns of energy drink advertising over US television networks. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 2015;47(2):120-126.e1. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Emond JA, Karagas MR, Baker ER, Gilbert-Diamond D. Better diet quality during pregnancy is associated with a reduced likelihood of an infant born small for gestational age: an analysis of the Prospective New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study. Journal of Nutrition 2018;148(1):22-30. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Everson TM, Armstrong DA, Jackson BP, Green BB, Karagas MR, Marsit CJ. Maternal cadmium, placental PCDHAC1, and fetal development. Reproductive Toxicology 2016;65:263-271. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Everson TM, Kappil M, Hao K, Jackson BP, Punshon T, Karagas MR, Chen J, Marsit CJ. Maternal exposure to selenium and cadmium, fetal growth, and placental expression of steroidogenic and apoptotic genes. Environmental Research 2017;158:233-244. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Everson TM, Punshon T, Jackson BP, Hao K, Lambertini L, Chen J, Karagas MR, Marsit CJ. Cadmium-associated differential methylation throughout the placental genome:epigenome-wide association study of two U.S. birth cohorts. Environmental Health Perspectives 2018;126(1):017010 (13 pp.). R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Farzan SF, Chen Y, Wu F, Jiang J, Liu M, Baker E, Korrick SA, Karagas MR. Blood pressure changes in relation to arsenic exposure in a U.S. pregnancy cohort. Environmental Health Perspectives 2015;123(10):999-1006. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Farzan SF, Chen Y, Rees JR, Zens MS, Karagas MR. Risk of death from cardiovascular disease associated with low-level arsenic exposure among long-term smokers in a US population-based study. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 2015;287(2):93-97. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Farzan SF, Brickley EB, Li Z, Gilbert-Diamond D, Gossai A, Chen Y, Howe CG, Palys T, Karagas MR. Maternal and infant inflammatory markers in relation to prenatal arsenic exposure in a U.S. pregnancy cohort. Environmental Research 2017;156:426-433. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Fei DL, Koestler DC, Li Z, Giambelli C, Sanchez-Mejias A, Gosse JA, Marsit CJ, Karagas MR, Robbins DJ. Association between In Utero arsenic exposure, placental gene expression, and infant birth weight: a US birth cohort study. Environmental Health 2013;12:58 (8 pp.). R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Felix JF, Joubert BR, Baccarelli AA, Sharp GC, Almqvist C, Annesi-Maesano I, Arshad H, Baiz N, Bakermans-Kranenburg MJ, Bakulski KM, Binder EB, Bouchard L, Breton CV, Brunekreef B, Brunst KJ, Burchard EG, Bustamante M, Chatzi L, Cheng Munthe-Kaas M, Corpeleijn E, Czamara D, Dabelea D, Davey Smith G, De Boever P, Duijts L, Dwyer T, Eng C, Eskenazi B, Everson TM, Falahi F, Fallin MD, Farchi S, Fernandez MF, Gao L, Gaunt TR, Ghantous A, Gillman MW, Gonseth S, Grote V, Gruzieva O, Haberg SE. Cohort profile: Pregnancy And Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) Consortium. International Journal of Epidemiology 2018;47(1):22-23u. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Frediani JK, Naioti EA, Vos MB, Figueroa J, Marsit CJ, Welsh JA. Arsenic exposure and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) among U.S. adolescents and adults: an association modified by race/ethnicity, NHANES 2005-2014. Environmental Health 2018;17(1):6 (8 pp.). R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Gilbert-Diamond D, Li Z, Adachi-Mejia AM, McClure AC, Sargent JD. Association of a television in the bedroom with increased adiposity gain in a nationally representative sample of children and adolescents. JAMA Pediatrics 2014;168(5):427-434. R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Gossai A, Lesseur C, Farzan S, Marsit C, Karagas MR, Gilbert-Diamond D. Association between maternal urinary arsenic species and infant cord blood leptin levels in a New Hampshire Pregnancy Cohort. Environmental Research 2015;136:180-186. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Grandjean P, Barouki R, Bellinger DC, Casteleyn L, Chadwick LH, Cordier S, Etzel RA, Gray KA, Ha EH, Junien C, Karagas M, Kawamoto T, Paige Lawrence B, Perera FP, Prins GS, Puga A, Rosenfeld CS, Sherr DH, Sly PD, Suk W, Sun Q, Toppari J, van den Hazel P, Walker CL, Heindel JJ. Life-long implications of developmental exposure to environmental stressors: new perspectives. Endocrinology 2015;156(10):3408-3415. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Green BB, Armstrong DA, Lesseur C, Paquette AG, Guerin DJ, Kwan LE, Marsit CJ. The role of placental 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and type 2 methylation on gene expression and infant birth weight. Biology of Reproduction 2015;92(6):149 (8 pp.). R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article He X, Karagas R, Murray C. Impact of receipt of private well arsenic test results on maternal use of contaminated drinking water in a U.S. population. Science of the Total Environment 2018;643:1055-1012. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Hoen AG, Li J, Moulton LA, O'Toole GA, Housman ML, Koestler DC, Guill MF, Moore JH, Hibberd PL, Morrison HG, Sogin ML, Karagas MR, Madan JC. Associations between gut microbial colonization in early life and respiratory outcomes in cystic fibrosis. Journal of Pediatrics 2015;167(1):138-147.e1-3. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Hoen AG, Madan JC, Li Z, Coker M, Lundgren SN, Morrison HG, Palys T, Jackson BP, Sogin ML, Cottingham KL, Karagas MR. Sex-specific associations of infants' gut microbiome with arsenic exposure in a US population. Scientific Reports 2018;8(1):12627 (10 pp.). R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Houseman EA, Kelsey KT, Wiencke JK, Marsit CJ. Cell-composition effects in the analysis of DNA methylation array data:a mathematical perspective. BMC Bioinformatics 2015;16(1):95 (16 pp.). R835442 (2016)
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  • Journal Article Jackson BP. Fast ion chromatography-ICP-QQQ for arsenic speciation. Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry 2015;30(6):1405-1407. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Jackson BP, Punshon T. Recent advances in the measurement of arsenic, cadmium, and mercury in rice and other foods. Current Environmental Health Reports 2015;2(1):15-24. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Jackson BP, Liba A, Nelson J. Advantages of reaction cell ICP-MS on doubly charged interferences for arsenic and selenium analysis in foods. Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry 2015;30(5):1179-1183. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Karagas MR, Zens MS, Li Z, Stukel TA, Perry AE, Gilbert-Diamond D, Sayarath V, Stephenson RS, Barton D, Nelson HH, Spencer SK. Early-onset basal cell carcinoma and indoor tanning: a population-based study. Pediatrics 2014;134(1):e4-e12. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Karagas MR, Gossai A, Pierce B, Ahsan H. Drinking water arsenic contamination, skin lesions and malignancies: a systematic review of the global evidence. Current Environmental Health Reports 2015;2(1):52-68. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Kaushal A, Zhang H, Karmaus WJJ, Everson TM, Marsit CJ, Karagas MR, Tsai SF, Wen HJ, Wang SL. Genome-wide DNA methylation at birth in relation to in utero arsenic exposure and the associated health in later life. Environmental Health 2017;16(1):50. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Kingsley SL, Deyssenroth MA, Kelsey KT, Awad YA, Kloog I, Schwartz JD, Lambertini L, Chen J, Marsit CJ, Wellenius GA. Maternal residential air pollution and placental imprinted gene expression. Environment International 2017;108:204-211. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Koestler DC, Avissar-Whiting M, Houseman EA, Karagas MR, Marsit CJ. Differential DNA methylation in umbilical cord blood of infants exposed to low levels of arsenic in utero. Environmental Health Perspectives 2013;121(8):971-977. R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Lansigan RK, Emond JA, Gilbert-Diamond D. Understanding eating in the absence of hunger among young children: a systematic review of existing studies. Appetite 2015;85:36-47. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Lesseur C, Armstrong DA, Murphy MA, Appleton AA, Koestler DC, Paquette AG, Lester BM, Marsit CJ. Sex-specific associations between placental leptin promoter DNA methylation and infant neurobehavior. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2014;40:1-9. R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Lesseur C, Paquette AG, Marsit CJ. Epigenetic regulation of infant neurobehavioral outcomes. Medical Epigenetics 2014;2(2):71-79. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Lester BM, Marsit CJ. Epigenetic mechanisms in the placenta related to infant neurodevelopment. Epigenomics 2018;10(3):321-333. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Li Z, Frost HR, Tosteson TD, Zhao L, Liu L, Lyons K, Chen H, Cole B, Currow D, Bakitas M. A semiparametric joint model for terminal trend of quality of life and survival in palliative care research. Statistics in Medicine 2017;36(29):4692-4704. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Litzky JF, Boulet SL, Esfandiari N, Zhang Y, Kissin DM, Theiler RN, Marsit CJ. Effect of frozen/thawed embryo transfer on birthweight, macrosomia, and low birthweight rates in US singleton infants. American Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology 2018;218(4):433.e1-433.e10. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Litzky JF, Boulet SL, Esfandiari N, Zhang Y, Kissin DM, Theiler RN, Marsit CJ. Birthweight in infants conceived through in vitro fertilization following blastocyst or cleavage-stage embryo transfer: a national registry study. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics 2018;35(6):1027-1037. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Litzky JF, Deyssenroth MA, Everson TM, Lester BM, Lambertini L, Chen J, Marsit CJ. Prenatal exposure to maternal depression and anxiety on imprinted gene expression in placenta and infant neurodevelopment and growth. Pediatric Research 2018;83(5):1075-1083. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Lundgren SN, Madan JC, Emond JA, Morrison HG, Christensen BC, Karagas MR, Hoen AG. Maternal diet during pregnancy is related with the infant stool microbiome in a delivery mode-dependent manner. Microbiome 2018;6(1):109(11 pp.). R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Maccani JZ, Koestler DC, Houseman EA, Marsit CJ, Kelsey KT. Placental DNA methylation alterations associated with maternal tobacco smoking at the RUNX3 gene are also associated with gestational age. Epigenomics 2013;5(6):619-630. R835442 (2014)
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  • Journal Article Maccani JZ, Koestler DC, Houseman EA, Armstrong DA, Marsit CJ, Kelsey KT. DNA methylation changes in the placenta are associated with fetal manganese exposure. Reproductive Toxicology 2015;57:43-49. R835442 (2016)
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  • Journal Article Maccani JZJ, Koestler DC, Lester B, Houseman EA, Armstrong DA, Kelsey KT, Marsit CJ. Placental DNA methylation related to both infant toenail mercury and adverse neurobehavioral outcomes. Environmental Health Perspectives 2015;123(7):723-729. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Marsit CJ, Brummel SS, Kacanek D, Seage III GR, Spector SA, Armstrong DA, Lester BM, Rich K, Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Studies Network. Infant peripheral blood repetitive element hypomethylation associated with antiretroviral therapy in utero. Epigenetics 2015;10(8):708-716. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Marsit CJ. Influence of environmental exposure on human epigenetic regulation. Journal of Experimental Biology 2015;218(Pt 1):71-79. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Marsit CJ. Placental epigenetics in children’s environmental health. Seminars in Reproductive Medicine 2016;34(1):36-41. R835442 (2016)
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  • Journal Article Martin E, Smeester L, Bommarito PA, Grace MR, Boggess K, Kuban K, Karagas MR, Marsit CJ, O'Shea TM, Fry RC. Sexual epigenetic dimorphism in the human placenta:implications for susceptibility during the prenatal period. Epigenomics 2017;9(3):267-278. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Nachman KE, Punshon T, Rardin L, Signes-Pastor AJ, Murray CJ, Jackson BP, Guerinot ML, Burke TA, Chen CY, Ahsan H, Argos M, Cottingham KL, Cubadda F, Ginsberg GL, Goodale BC, Kurzius-Spencer M, Meharg AA, Miller MD, Nigra AE, Pendergrast CB, Raab A, Reimer K, Scheckel KG, Schwerdtle T, Taylor VF, Tokar EJ, Warczak TM, Karagas MR. Opportunities and challenges for dietary arsenic intervention. Environmental Health Perspectives 2018;126(8):84503 (6 pp.). R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Nadeau KC, Li Z, Farzan S, Koestler D, Robbins D, Fei DL, Malipatlolla M, Maecker H, Enelow R, Korrick S, Karagas MR. In utero arsenic exposure and fetal immune repertoire in a US pregnancy cohort. Clinical Immunology 2014;155(2):188-197. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Nygaard UC, Li Z, Palys T, Jackson B, Subbiah M, Malipatlolla M, Sampath V, Maecker H, Karagas MR, Nadeau KC. Cord blood T cell subpopulations and associations with maternal cadmium and arsenic exposures. PLoS One 2017;12(6):e0179606. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Paquette AG, Lester BM, Koestler DC, Lesseur C, Armstrong DA, Marsit CJ. Placental FKBP5 genetic and epigenetic variation is associated with infant neurobehavioral outcomes in the RICHS cohort. PLoS One 2014;9(8):e104913 (10 pp.). R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Paquette AG, Marsit CJ. The developmental basis of epigenetic regulation of HTR2A and psychiatric outcomes. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 2014;115(12):2065-2072. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Patel CJ, Kerr J, Thomas DC, Mukherjee B, Ritz B, Chatterjee N, Jankowska M, Madan J, Karagas MR, McAllister KA, Mechanic LE, Fallin MD, Ladd-Acosta C, Blair IA, Teiltelbaum SL, Amos CI. Opportunities and challenges for environmental exposure assessment in population-based studies. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 2017;26(9):1370-1380. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Pearce N, Blair A, Vineis P, Ahrens W, Andersen A, Anto JM, Armstrong BK, Baccarelli AA, Beland FA, Berrington A, Bertazzi PA, Birnbaum LS, Brownson RC, Bucher JR, Cantor KP, Cardis E, Cherrie JW, Christiani DC, Cocco P, Coggon D, Comba P, Demers PA, Dement JM, Douwes J, Eisen EA, Engel LS, Fenske RA, Fleming LE, Fletcher T, Fontham E, Forastiere F, Frentzel-Beyme R, Fritschi L, Gerin M, Goldberg M, Grandjean P, Grimsrud TK, Gustavsson P, Haines A, Hartge P, Hansen J, Hauptmann M, Heederik D, Hemminki K, Hemon D, Hertz-Picciotto I, Hoppin JA, Huff J, Jarvholm B, Kang D, Karagas MR, Kjaerheim K, Kjuus H, Kogevinas M, Kriebel D, Kristensen P, Kromhout H, Laden F, Lebailly P, LeMasters G, Lubin JH, Lynch CF, Lynge E, 't Mannetje F, McMichael AJ, Mclaughlin JR, Marrett L, Martuzzi M, Merchant JA, Merler E, Merletti F, Miller A, Mirer FE, Monson R, Nordby K-C, Olshan AF, Parent M-E, Perera FP, Perry MJ, Pesatori AC, Pirastu R, Porta M, Pukkala E, Rice C, Richardson DB, Ritter L, Ritz B, Ronckers CM, Rushton L, Rusiecki JA, Rusyn I, Samet JM, Sandler DP, de Sanjose S, Schernhammer E, Costantini AS, Seixas N, Shy C, Siemiatycki J, Silverman DT, Simonato L,Smith AH, Smith MT, Spinelli JJ, Spitz MR, Stallones L, Stayner LT, Steenland K, Stenzel M, Stewart BW, Stewart PA, Symanski E, Terracini B, Tolbert PE, Vainio H, Vena J, Vermeulen R, Victora CG, Ward EM, Weinberg CR, Weisenburger D, Wesseling C, Weiderpass E, Zahm SH. IARC Monographs: 40 years of evaluating carcinogenic hazards to humans. Environmental Health Perspectives 2015;123(6):507-514. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Peng S, Deyssenroth MA, Di Narzo AF, Lambertini L, Marsit CJ, Chen J, Hao K. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in human placentas suggest developmental origins of complex diseases. Human Molecular Genetics 2017;26(17):3432-3441. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Punshon T, Chen S, Finney L, Howard L, Jackson BP, Karagas MR, Ornvold K. High-resolution elemental mapping of human placental chorionic villi using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry 2015;407(22):6839-6850. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Punshon T, Jackson BP, Meharg AA, Warczack T, Scheckel K, Guerinot ML. Understanding arsenic dynamics in agronomic systems to predict and prevent uptake by crop plants. Science of the Total Environment 2017;581-582:209-220. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Punshon T, Jackson BP. Essential micronutrient and toxic trace element concentrations in gluten containing and gluten-free foods. Food Chemistry 2018;252:258-264. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Romano ME, Webster GM, Vuong AM, Zoeller RT, Chen A, Hoofnagle AN, Calafat AM, Karagas MR, Yolton K, Lanphear BP, Braun JM. Gestational urinary bisphenol A and maternal and newborn thyroid hormone concentrations: the HOME Study. Environmental Research 2015;138:453-460. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Rothenberg SE, Korrick SA, Fayad R. The influence of obesity on blood mercury levels for U.S. non-pregnant adults and children: NHANES 2007-2010. Environmental Research 2015;138:173-180. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Sharp GC, Salas LA, Monnereau C, Allard C, Yousefi P, Everson TM, Bohlin J, XuZ, Huang RC, Reese SE, Xu CJ, Baiz N, Hoyo C, Agha G, Roy R, Holloway JW, Ghantous A, Merid SK, Bakulski KM, Kupers LK, Zhang H, Richmond RC, Page CM, Duijts L, Lie RT, Melton PE, Vonk JM, Nohr EA, Williams-DeVane C, Huen K, Rifas-Shiman SL, Ruiz-Arenas C, Gonseth S, Rezwan FI, Herceg Z, Ekstrom S, Croen L, Falahi F, Perron P, Karagas MR, Quraishi BM, Suderman M, Magnus MC, Jaddoe VWV, Taylor JA, Anderson D, Zhao S, Smit HA, Josey MJ, Bradman A, Baccarelli AA, Bustamante M, Haberg SE, Pershagen G, Hertz-Picciotto I, Newschaffer C, Corpeleijn E, Bouchard L, Lawlor DA, Maguire RL, Barcellos LF, Davey Smith G, Eskenazi B, Karmaus W, Marsit CJ, Hivert MF, Snieder H, Fallin MD, Melen E, Munthe-Kaas MC, Arshad H, Wiemels JL, Annesi-Maesano I, Vrijheid M, Oken E, Holland N, Murphy SK, Sorensen TIA, Koppelman GH, Newnham JP, Wilcox AJ, Nystad W, London SJ, Felix JF, Relton CL. Maternal BMI at the start of pregnancy and offspring epigenome-wide DNA methylation: findings from the pregnancy and childhood epigenetics (PACE) consortium. Human Molecular Genetics 2017;26(20):4067-4085. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Shi X, Miller S, Mwenda K, Onda A, Rees J, Onega T, Gui J, Karagas M, Demidenko E, Moeschler J. Mapping disease at an approximated individual level using aggregate data: a case study of mapping New Hampshire birth defects. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 2013;10(9):4161-4174. R835442 (2016)
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  • Journal Article Shi X, Ayotte JD, Onda A, Miller S, Rees J, Gilbert-Diamond D, Onega T, Gui J, Karagas M, Moeschler J. Geospatial association between adverse birth outcomes and arsenic in groundwater in New Hampshire, USA. Environmental Geochemistry and Health 2015;37(2):333-351. R835442 (2016)
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  • Journal Article Signes-Pastor AJ, Vioque J, Navarrete-Munoz EM, Carey M, García de la Hera M, Sunyer J, Casas M, Riano-Galan I, Tardon A, Llop S, Amoros R, Amiano P, Bilbao JR, Karagas MR, Meharg AA. Concentrations of urinary arsenic species in relation to rice and seafood consumption among children living in Spain. Environmental Research 2017;159:69-75. R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Signes-Pastor AJ, Cottingham KL, Carey M, Sayarath V, Palys T, Meharg AA, Folt CL, Karagas MR. Infants' dietary arsenic exposure during transition to solid food. Scientific Reports 2018;8(1):7114 (8 pp.). R835442 (2018)
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  • Journal Article Sverrisson EF, Zens MS, Fei DL, Andrews A, Schned A, Robbins D, Kelsey KT, Li H, DiRenzo J, Karagas MR, Seigne JD. Clinicopathological correlates of Gli1 expression in a population-based cohort of patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer. Urologic Oncology 2014;32(5):539-545. R835442 (2015)
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  • Journal Article Thompson JA, Marsit CJ. A methylation-to-expression feature model for generating accurate prognostic risk scores and identifying diease targets in clear cell kidney cancer. Pac Symp Biocomput. 2016;22:509-520. PMID:27897002 PMCID:PMC5177986 (https://www-ncbi-nlm-nih-gov.dartmouth.idm.oclc.org/pubmed/?term=PMC5177986). R835442 (Final)
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    Journal Article Lai PY, Cottingham KL, Steinmaus C, Karagas MR, Miller MD. Arsenic and rice:translating research to address health care providers' needs. The Journal of Pediatrics 2015;167(4):797-803. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Emond JA, Smith ME, Mathur SJ, Sargent JD, Gilbert-Diamond D. Children’s food and beverage promotion on television to parents. Pediatrics 2015;136(6):1095-1102. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Green BB, Kappil M, Lambertini L, Armstrong DA, Guerin DJ, Sharp AJ, Lester BM, Chen J, Marsit CJ. Expression of imprinted genes in placenta is associated with infant neurobehavioral development. Epigenetics 2015;10(9):834-841. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Winterbottom EF, Fei DL, Koestler DC, Giambelli C, Wika E, Capobianco AJ, Lee E, Marsit CJ, Karagas MR, Robbins DJ. GLI3 links environmental arsenic exposure and human fetal growth. EBioMedicine 2015;2(6):536-543. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Farzan SF, Li Z, Korrick SA, Spiegelman D, Enelow R, Nadeau K, Baker E, Karagas MR. Infant infections and respiratory symptoms in relation to in utero arsenic exposure in a US cohort. Environmental Health Perspectives 2015;124(6): 840-847. R835442 (Final)
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    Journal Article Punshon T, Davis MA, Marsit CJ, Theiler SK, Baker ER, Jackson BP, Conway DC, Karagas MR. Placental arsenic concentrations in relation to both maternal and infant biomarkers of exposure in a US cohort. Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology 2015;25(6):599. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Kappil MA, Green BB, Armstrong DA, Sharp AJ, Lambertini L, Marsit CJ, Chen J. Placental expression profile of imprinted genes impacts birth weight. Epigenetics 2015;10(9):842-849. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Carignan CC, Punshon T, Karagas MR, Cottingham KL. Potential exposure to arsenic from infant rice cereal. Annals of Global Health 2016;82(1):221-224. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Karagas MR, Punshon T, Sayarath V, Jackson BP, Folt CL, Cottingham KL. Association of rice and rice product consumption with arsenic exposure early in life. JAMA Pediatrics 2016;170(6):609-616. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Houseman EA, Kile M, Christiani D, Tan I, Kelsey KT, Marsit CJ. Reference-free deconvolution of DNA methylation data and mediation by cell composition effects. BMC Bioinformatics 2016;17:259. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Fried D, Rhyu J, Odata KB, Blunt HB, Karagas MR, Gilbert-Diamond D. Maternal and cord blood vitamin D status and childhood infection and allergic disease: a systematic review. Nutrition Reviews 2016;74(6);387-410. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Li B, Giambelli C, Tang B, Winterbottom E, Long J, Jin K, Wang Z, Fei DL, Nguyen DM, Athar M, Wang B. Arsenic attenuates GLI signaling, increasing or decreasing its transcriptional program in a context-dependent manner. Molecular Pharmacology 2016;89(2):226-232. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Madan JC, Hoen AG, Lundgren SN, Farzan SF, Cottingham KL, Morrison HG, Sogin ML, Li H, Moore JH, Karagas MR. Association of cesarean delivery and formula supplementation with the intestinal microbiome of 6-week-old infants. JAMA Pediatrics 2016;170(3):212-219. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.3732. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Green BB, Karagas MR, Punshon T, Jackson BP, Robbins DJ, Houseman EA, Marsit CJ. Epigenome-wide assessment of DNA methylation in the placenta and arsenic exposure in the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study (USA). Environmental Health Perspectives 2016;124(8):1253-1260. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Green BB, Houseman EA, Johnson KC, Guerin DJ, Armstrong DA, Christensen BC, Marsit CJ. Hydroxymethylation is uniquely distributed within term placenta, and is associated with gene expression. The FASEB Journal 2016;30(8):2874-2884. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Kingsley SL, Eliot MN, Whitsel EA, Huang YT, Kelsey KT, Marsit CJ, Wellenius GA. Maternal residential proximity to major roadways, birth weight, and placental DNA methylation. Environment International 2016;92:43-49. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Madan JC. Neonatal gastrointestinal and respiratory microbiome in cystic fibrosis: potential interactions and implications for systemic health. Clinical Therapeutics 2016;38(4): 740-746. doi:10.1016/j.clinthera.2016.02.008. R835442 (Final)
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    Journal Article Punshon T, Li Z, Marsit CJ, Jackson BP, Baker ER, Karagas MR. Placental metal concentrations in relation to maternal and infant toenails in a US cohort. Environmental Science & Technology 2016;50(3):1587-1594. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Appleton AA, Murphy MA, Koestler DC, Lesseur C, Paquette AG, Padbury JF, Lester BM, Marsit CJ. Prenatal programming of infant neurobehaviour in a healthy population. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2016;30(4):367-375. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Paquette AG, Houseman EA, Green BB, Lesseur C, Armstrong DA, Lester B, Marsit CJ. Regions of variable DNA methylation in human placenta associated with newborn neurobehavior. Epigenetics 2016;11(8):603-613. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Gilbert-Diamond D, Emond JA, Baker ER, Korrick SA, Karagas MR. Relation between in utero arsenic exposure and birth outcomes in a cohort of mothers and their newborns from New Hampshire. Environmental Health Perspectives 2016;124(8):1299-1307. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Demidenko E. The p-value you can’t buy. The American Statistician 2016;70(1):33-38. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Appleton AA, Jackson BP, Karagas M, Marsit CJ. Prenatal exposure to neurotoxic metals is associated with increased placental glucocorticoid receptor DNA methylation. Epigenetics 2017;12(8):607-615. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Cubadda F, Jackson BP, Cottingham KL, Van Horne YO, Kurzius-Spencer M. Human exposure to dietary inorganic arsenic and other arsenic species: state of knowledge, gaps and uncertainties. Science of the Total Environment 2017;579:1228-1239. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Deyssenroth MA, Peng S, Hao K, Lambertini L, Marsit CJ, Chen J. Whole-transcriptome analysis delineates the human placenta gene network and its associations with fetal growth. BMC Genomics 2017;18(1):520. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Rokoff LB, Koutrakis P, Garshick E, Karagas MR, Oken E, Gold DR, Fleisch AF. Wood stove pollution in the developed world: a case to raise awareness among pediatricians. Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care 2017;47(6):123-141. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Nachman KE, Ginsberg GL, Miller MD, Murray CJ, Nigra AE, Pendergrast CB. Mitigating dietary arsenic exposure: current status in the United States and recommendations for an improved path forward. Science of the Total Environment 2017;581-582:221-236. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Bulka CM, Davis MA, Karagas MR, Ahsan H, Argos M. The Unintended Consequences of a Gluten-Free Diet. Epidemiology 2017;28(3):e24-e25. R835442 (2017)
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  • Journal Article Baker BA, Cassano VA, Murray C. Arsenic exposure, assessment, toxicity, diagnosis, and management:guidance for occupational and environmental physicians.Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2018;60(12):e634-9. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Li Z, Lee K, Karagas MR, Madan JC, Hoen AG, O’Malley AJ, Li H. Conditional regression based on a multivariate zero-inflated logistic-normal model for microbiome relative abundance data. Statistics in Biosciences 2018;10(3):587-608. doi:10.1007/s12561-018-9219-2. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Tian FY, Marsit CJ. Environmentally induced epigenetic plasticity in development:epigenetic toxicity and epigenetic adaptation. Current Epidemiology Reports 2018;5(4):450-460. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Everson TM, Marsit CJ. Integrating-omics approaches into human population-based studies of prenatal and early-life exposures. Current Environmental Health Reports 2018;5(3):328-337. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Deyssenroth MA, Gennings C, Liu SH, Peng S, Hao K, Lambertini L, Jackson BP, Karagas MR, Marsit CJ, Chen J. Intrauterine multi-metal exposure is associated with reduced fetal growth through modulation of the placental gene network. Environment International 2018;120:373-381. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article White AJ, O'Brien KM, Jackson BP, Karagas MR. Urine and toenail cadmium levels in pregnant women:a reliability study. Environment International 2018;118:86-91. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2018.05.030. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Kennedy E, Everson TM, Punshon T, Jackson BP, Hao K, Lambertini L, Chen J, Karagas MR, Marsit CJ. Copper associates with differential methylation in placentae from two US birth cohorts. Epigenetics 2019:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Clarkson-Townsend DA, Everson TM, Deyssenroth MA, Burt AA, Hermetz KE, Hao K, Chen J, Marsit CJ. Maternal circadian disruption is associated with variation in placental DNA methylation. PloS One 2019;14(4):e0215745. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Salas LA, Baker ER, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Marsit CJ, Christensen BC, Karagas MR. Maternal swimming pool exposure during pregnancy in relation to birth outcomes and cord blood DNA methylation among private well users. Environment International 2019;123:459-466. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Kupers LK, Monnereau C, Sharp GC, Yousefi P, Salas LA, Ghantous A, Page CM, Reese SE, Wilcox AJ, Czamara D, Starling AP, Novoloaca A, Lent S, Roy R, Hoyo C, Breton CV, Allard C, Just AC, Bakulski KM, Holloway JW, Everson TM, Xu CJ, Huang RC, van der Plaat DA, Wielscher M, Merid SK, Ullemar V, Rezwan FI, Lahti J, van Dongen J, Langie SAS, Richardson TG, Magnus MC, Nohr EA, Xu Z, Duijts L, Zhao S, Zhang W, Plusquin M, DeMeo DL, Solomon O, Heimovaara JH, Jima DD, Gao L, Bustamante M, Perron P, Wright RO, Hertz-Picciotto I, Zhang H, Karagas MR, Gehring U, Marsit CJ, Beilin LJ, Vonk JM, Jarvelin MR, Bergstrom A, Ortqvist AK, Ewart S, Villa PM, Moore SE, Willemsen G, Standaert ARL, Haberg SE, Sorensen TIA, Taylor JA, Raikkonen K, Yang IV, Kechris K, Nawrot TS, Silver MJ, Gong YY, Richiardi L, Kogevinas M, Litonjua AA, Eskenazi B, Huen K, Mbarek H, Maguire RL, Dwyer T, Vrijheid M, Bouchard L, Baccarelli AA, Croen LA, Karmaus W, Anderson D, de Vries M, Sebert S, Kere J, Karlsson R, Arshad SH, Hamalainen E, Routledge MN, Boomsma DI, Feinberg AP, Newschaffer CJ, Govarts E, Moisse M, Fallin MD, Melen E, Prentice AM, Kajantie E, Almqvist C, Oken E, Dabelea D, Boezen HM, Melton PE, Wright RJ, Koppelman GH, Trevisi L, Hivert MF, Sunyer J, Munthe-Kaas MC, Murphy SK, Corpeleijn E, Wiemels J, Holland N, Herceg Z, Binder EB, Davey Smith G, Jaddoe VWV, Lie RT, Nystad W, London SJ, Lawlor DA, Relton CL, Snieder H, Felix JF. Meta-analysis of epigenome-wide association studies in neonates reveals widespread differential DNA methylation associated with birthweight. Nature Communications 2019;10(1):1893. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Everson TM, Marable C, Deyssenroth MA, Punshon T, Jackson BP, Lambertini L, Karagas MR, Chen J, Marsit CJ. Placental expression of imprinted genes, overall and in sex-specific patterns, associated with placental cadmium concentrations and birth size. Environmental Health Perspectives 2019;127(5):057005. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Winterbottom EF, Moroishi Y, Halchenko Y, Armstrong DA, Beach PJ, Nguyen QP, Capobianco AJ, Ayad NG, Marsit CJ, Li Z, Karagas MR. Prenatal arsenic exposure alters the placental expression of multiple epigenetic regulators in a sex-dependent manner. Environmental Health 2019;18(1):18. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Emeny RT, Korrick SA, Li Z, Nadeau K, Madan J, Jackson B, Baker E, Karagas MR. Prenatal exposure to mercury in relation to infant infections and respiratory symptoms in the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study. Environmental Research 2019;171:523-529. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Signes-Pastor AJ, Bouchard MF, Baker E, Jackson BP, Karagas MR. Toenail manganese as biomarker of drinking water exposure:a reliability study from a US pregnancy cohort. Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology 2019;29(5):648-654. doi:10.1038/s41370-018-0108-z. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Antosca KM, Chernikova DA, Price CE, Ruoff KL, Li K, Guill MF, Sontag NA, Morrison HG, Hao S, Drumm ML, MacKenzie TA. Altered stool microbiota of infants with cystic fibrosis shows a reduction in genera associated with immune programming from birth. Journal of Bacteriology 2019:JB-00274. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Singh S, Karagas MR, Mueller NT. Charting the maternal and infant microbiome: what is the role of diabetes and obesity in pregnancy? Current Diabetes Reports 2017 Feb;17(2):11. doi: 10.1007/s11892-017-0836-9. R835442 (Final)
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    Journal Article Paquette AG, Lester BM, Lesseur C, Armstrong DA, Guerin DJ, Appleton AA, Marsit CJ. Placental epigenetic patterning of glucocorticoid response genes is associated with infant neurodevelopment. Epigenomics 20157(5):767-779. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Muse ME, Li Z, Baker ER, Cottingham KL, Korrick SA, Karagas MR, Gilbert-Diamond D. Relation between in utero arsenic exposure and growth during the first year of life in a New Hampshire pregnancy cohort. Environmental Research 2019:108604. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Fleisch AF, Rokoff LB, Garshick E, Grady ST, Chipman JW, Baker ER, Koutrakis P, Karagas MR. Residential wood stove use and indoor exposure to PM2.5 and its components in Northern New England. Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology 2019. R835442 (Final)
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  • Journal Article Green BB, Marsit CJ. Select prenatal environmental exposures and subsequent alterations of gene-specific and repetitive element DNA methylation in fetal tissues. Current Environmental Health Reports 2015;2(2):126-136. R835442 (Final)
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  • Supplemental Keywords:

    water, drinking water, ground water, exposure, risk, health effects, human health, vulnerability, sensitive populations, population, infants, children, susceptibility, metals, heavy metals, public policy, decision making, community-based, public good, environmental chemistry, biology, geography, epidemiology, immunology, analytical, surveys, measurement methods, Northeast, EPA Region 1, food processing, water safety

    Relevant Websites:

    Dartmouth Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center Website Exit

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2014 Progress Report
  • 2015 Progress Report
  • 2016 Progress Report
  • 2017 Progress Report
  • 2018 Progress Report