EPA Science Inventory

A synoptic survey of ecosystem services from headwater catchments in the United States (presentation)

Citation:

Hill, B., R. Kolka, F. McCormick, AND M. Starry. A synoptic survey of ecosystem services from headwater catchments in the United States (presentation). Presented at Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR, May 18 - 23, 2014.

Description:

Ecosystem production functions for water supply, climate regulation, and water purification were estimated for 568 headwater streams and their catchments. Water supply per unit catchment area was highest in the Northern Appalachian Mountains and lowest in the Northern Plains. C, N, and P sequestered in trees were highest in Northern and Southern Appalachian and Western Mountain catchments, but C, N, and P sequestered in soils were highest in the Upper Midwest ecoregion. Catchment denitrification was highest in the Western Mountains. In-stream denitrification was highest in the Temperate Plains. Ecological production functions paired with published economic values for these services revealed the importance of mountain catchments for water supply, climate regulation, and water purification per unit catchment area. The larger catchment sizes of the plains ecoregions resulted in their higher economic value compared to the other ecoregions. The combined potential economic value across headwater catchments was $14,000 ha/ y, or $30 million/y per catchment. The economic importance of headwater catchments is even greater considering that our study catchments statistically represent more than 2 million headwater catchments in the continental United States.

Purpose/Objective:

not applicable

URLs/Downloads:

HILL ABSTRACT.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 64.784 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Completion Date: 07/16/2014
Record Last Revised: 07/16/2014
Record Created: 07/16/2014
Record Released: 07/16/2014
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 281254

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LAB

MID-CONTINENT ECOLOGY DIVISION