EPA Science Inventory

RLINE: Re-formulation of Plume Spread for Near-Surface Dispersion

Citation:

Venkatram, A., M. Snyder, D. Heist, S. Perry, B. Petersen, AND V. Isakov. RLINE: Re-formulation of Plume Spread for Near-Surface Dispersion. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, 77:864-855, (2013).

Description:

Recent concerns about effects of automobile emissions on the health of people living close to roads have motivated an examination of models to estimate dispersion in the surface boundary layer. During the development of a new line source dispersion model, RLINE (Snyder et al., 2013), analysis of data from a tracer field study led to a re-examination of near-surface dispersion resulting in new formulations for horizontal and vertical plume spread presented in this paper. The equations for vertical spread use the solution of the two-dimensional diffusion equation, in which the eddy diffusivity, based on surface layer similarity, is a function of surface micrometeorological variables such as surface friction velocity and Monin-Obukhov length. The horizontal plume spread equations are based on Eckman’s (1994) suggestion that plume spread is governed by horizontal turbulent velocity fluctuations and the vertical variation of the wind speed at mean plume height. Concentration estimates based on the proposed plume spread equations compare well with data from both the Prairie Grass experiment (Barad, 1958) as well as the recently conducted Idaho Falls experiment (Finn et al., 2010). One of the major conclusions of this study is that the plume spreads as well as the wind speed used to estimate concentrations in a dispersion model form a set of coupled variables.

Purpose/Objective:

The National Exposure Research Laboratory′s (NERL′s)Atmospheric Modeling Division (AMAD) conducts research in support of EPA′s mission to protect human health and the environment. AMAD′s research program is engaged in developing and evaluating predictive atmospheric models on all spatial and temporal scales for forecasting the Nation′s air quality and for assessing changes in air quality and air pollutant exposures, as affected by changes in ecosystem management and regulatory decisions. AMAD is responsible for providing a sound scientific and technical basis for regulatory policies based on air quality models to improve ambient air quality. The models developed by AMAD are being used by EPA, NOAA, and the air pollution community in understanding and forecasting not only the magnitude of the air pollution problem, but also in developing emission control policies and regulations for air quality improvements.

URLs/Downloads:

Atmospheric Environment   Exit

RLINE SPREADFORMULATIONS_5-28-13.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 416.06 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 05/15/2014
Completion Date: 05/15/2014
Record Last Revised: 06/30/2014
Record Created: 05/15/2014
Record Released: 05/15/2014
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 275881

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LAB

ATMOSPHERIC MODELING DIVISION

AIR-SURFACE PROCESSES MODELING BRANCH