EPA Science Inventory

How important is intraspecific genetic admixture to the success of colonising populations?

Citation:

Description:

Genetic admixture of divergent lineages is increasingly suspected to play an important role in the success of colonizing populations. This has become a particularly prominent theme in the literature on biological invasions, where admixture is now commonly proposed as an important contributor to invasiveness. However, because selection is typically expected to favor locally adapted genotypes and select against intraspecific hybridization, it remains unclear how often admixture can act as a true driver of colonization success. We review the population consequences of admixture and discuss its costs and benefits across a broad spectrum of ecological contexts. We critically evaluate the evidence for a causal role of admixture in successful colonization, and consider that role more generally in driving population range expansion.

Purpose/Objective:

This paper reviews the role of genetic admixture in driving population range expansions, especially in reference to invasive species. It critically surveys evidence for the importance of genetic admixture in this role, and provides recommendations for future research to better understand that role. It is relevant to understanding risks associated with invasive species, as genetic admixture is now frequently noted as a risk factor for invasiveness.

URLs/Downloads:

j.tree.2014.02.003   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT
Start Date: 04/11/2014
Completion Date: 04/11/2014
Record Last Revised: 04/15/2014
Record Created: 04/11/2014
Record Released: 04/11/2014
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 273147

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LAB

ECOLOGICAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH DIVISION

MOLECULAR ECOLOGY RESEARCH BRANCH