EPA Science Inventory

Gestational Exposure to Inhaled Vapors of Ethanol and Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Rats

Citation:

Bushnell, P., T. Beasley, P. Evansky, S. Martin, Ginger Moser, K. Mcdaniel, J. Norwood, M. Gilbert, R. Luebke, AND J. Rogers. Gestational Exposure to Inhaled Vapors of Ethanol and Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Rats. Presented at Society of Toxicology Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, March 23 - 27, 2014.

Description:

The US automotive fleet is powered primarily by gasoline-ethanol fuel blends containing up to 10% ethanol (ElO). Uncertainties regarding the health risks associated with exposure to ElO prompted assessment of the effects of prenatal exposure to inhaled vapors of gasoline-ethanol blends containing greater amounts of ethanol. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to fuel vapors, 6.5 hr/day, on days 9—20 of gestation, and their offspring were assessed using a variety of tests for clinical, physical. immunological and neurodevelopmental effects. Results of tests of cognitive function are reported in other abstracts. This report compares effects of inhaled ethanol (E100) at concentrations of 0, 5000, 10000, or 21000 ppm with effects of vapors of gasoline lacking (E0) or containing 15% ethanol (E15) at concentrations of 0, 3,000, 6,000, or 9,000 ppm. Maximum concentrations were limited by the lower explosive limits of the vapors. None of the vapors caused overt maternal toxicity, changes in litter size or weight, or altered the weight gain of the pups. With E100, motor activity and a few measures of a functional observational battery (hindlimb grip strength, excitability) were altered, but not in a dose-related maimer. No such changes were observed with E0 or El 5. With one exception, no dose-related changes were observed for any agent on any clinical, developmental, or immunological endpoint. Urinary protein concentrations suggesting potential kidney dysfunction, measured in the offspring at 3 and 6 months of age, increased across dose and age after E15 exposure; increases not related to dose were seen after exposure to EU. However, the highest measured protein concentration (300 mgldL) was lower than concentrations associated with kidney damage in this strain of rats (400—2500 mg/dL). Thus, even at these high concentrations, inhalation of these vapors does not appear to pose a serious public health hazard. This abstract does not represent EPA policy.

Purpose/Objective:

This abstract will be presented at the Society of Toxicology meeting March 23-27, 2014, Phoenix, AZ

URLs/Downloads:

TAD-14-018-ABSTRACT.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 287.99 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Completion Date: 03/17/2014
Record Last Revised: 03/17/2014
Record Created: 03/17/2014
Record Released: 03/17/2014
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 271079

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LAB

TOXICOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIVISION

NEUROTOXICOLOGY BRANCH