EPA Science Inventory

Impact of sulfur dioxide oxidation by Stabilized Criegee Intermediate on sulfate

Citation:

Sarwar, G., H. Simon, K. Fahey, R. Mathur, W. Goliff, AND W. Stockwell. Impact of sulfur dioxide oxidation by Stabilized Criegee Intermediate on sulfate. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, 85(3):204-214, (2014).

Description:

We revise the Carbon Bond chemical mechanism to explicitly represent three Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCIs) and their subsequent reactions with sulfur dioxide, water monomer, and water dimer, and incorporate the reactions into the Community Multiscale Air Quality model. The reaction of sulfur dioxide with SCI produces sulfuric acid which partitions into sulfate. We examine the impact of sulfur dioxide oxidation by SCI on sulfate using two different measured rate constants for the reaction of sulfur dioxide and SCI. When we use the higher rate constant and emissions estimates from the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System, it enhances monthly mean sulfate in summer by w20% in biogenically active areas. Enhancements are driven primarily by SCI produced from the reactions of biogenically derived alkenes and ozone. The use of the lower rate constant only marginally enhances sulfate since it is 65 times lower than the higher rate constant. We performed several sensitivity analyses to investigate the impacts of uncertain biogenic emissions and SCI loss rates. When we use the higher rate constant and emissions estimates from the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, it enhances monthly mean sulfate by w75%. A simulation using the lowest reported rate constant for the reaction of SCI and water indicated the maximum enhancement of sulfate from this chemistry was up to 4 µg/m3 over a 24-h period in some locations in the Southeastern U.S. Predictions without the SCI reaction are lower than observed sulfate while predictions with the SCI reaction improve the agreements with observations.

Purpose/Objective:

The National Exposure Research Laboratory′s (NERL′s)Atmospheric Modeling Division (AMAD) conducts research in support of EPA′s mission to protect human health and the environment. AMAD′s research program is engaged in developing and evaluating predictive atmospheric models on all spatial and temporal scales for forecasting the Nation′s air quality and for assessing changes in air quality and air pollutant exposures, as affected by changes in ecosystem management and regulatory decisions. AMAD is responsible for providing a sound scientific and technical basis for regulatory policies based on air quality models to improve ambient air quality. The models developed by AMAD are being used by EPA, NOAA, and the air pollution community in understanding and forecasting not only the magnitude of the air pollution problem, but also in developing emission control policies and regulations for air quality improvements.

URLs/Downloads:

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 01/16/2014
Completion Date: 01/16/2014
Record Last Revised: 01/16/2014
Record Created: 01/16/2014
Record Released: 01/16/2014
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 266751

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LAB

ATMOSPHERIC MODELING DIVISION

ATMOSPHERIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT BRANCH