EPA Science Inventory

Development of quantitative PCR assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Enterococcus spp. and their application to the identification of Enterococcus species in environmental samples

Citation:

Ryu, H., M. Henson, M. Elk, C. Toledo-Hernandez, J. Griffith, D. Blackwood, R. Noble, M. Gourmelon, S. Glassmeyer, AND J. Santodomingo. Development of quantitative PCR assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Enterococcus spp. and their application to the identification of Enterococcus species in environmental samples. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC, 79(1):196-204, (2013).

Description:

The detection of environmental enterococci has primarily been determined using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococci species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundance of enterococci was examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococci species, 16S rRNA gene group-specific qPCR assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococci species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococci strains were analyzed to further study enterococci diversity and to confirm the specificity of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted-species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with non-targeted species (1.3-6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococci species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were E. faecalis and E. faecium, although we identified more water isolates as E. casseliflavus than any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assays signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococci species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays at detecting the major enterococci groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to further determine the diversity, distribution, and relative abundance of all enterococci species in water.

Purpose/Objective:

The results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays at detecting the major enterococci groups in environmental water samples

URLs/Downloads:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02802-12   Exit

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 01/01/2013
Completion Date: 01/01/2013
Record Last Revised: 01/29/2014
Record Created: 01/15/2014
Record Released: 01/15/2014
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 266653

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION

MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS CONTROL BRANCH