EPA Science Inventory

Secondary organic aerosol characterization at field sites across the United States during the spring-summer period

Citation:

Lewandowski, M., I. Piletic, Tad Kleindienst, J. Offenberg, M. Beaver, M. Jaoui, K. Docherty, AND E. Edney. Secondary organic aerosol characterization at field sites across the United States during the spring-summer period. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, 93(10):1084-1103, (2013).

Description:

Sources of secondary organic carbon at 15 field sites across the United States (U.S.) during the years 2003-2010 have been examined. Filter samples have been taken for 24-h at a site in Research Triangle Park, NC; at SEARCH sites in southeastern U.S. during May and August 2005; at LADCO sites from Mar 2004-Feb 2005; Riverside, CA during SOAR in 2005; Cleveland, OH during CMAPS; and Pasadena and Bakersfield, CA during CalNex (see text for acronyms.) Samples were extracted, derivatised, and analysed for organic tracers by GC-MS. The mass fraction method described by Kleindienst et.al. was used to determine the contributions of the tracers to secondary organic carbon mass. Secondary organic aerosol masses were determined using laboratory-derived values for the organic mass-organic carbon (OM/OC) ratio. Results from the analysis show secondary organic carbon in the eastern and midwestern U.S. to be consistently dominated by SOA from biogenic emissions during the spring-summer period. SOA from biogenic emissions are far less important in the western U.S. during the same period with isoprene emissions being particularly weak. These sites in the western U.S. are in more densely populated, polluted regions of California and are probably not representative of sites in the rural western U.S. The ratio of tracers from monoterpenes can also provide information regarding presumed sources. Similarly, the ratio of isoprene tracers can provide information on reaction pathways (NOx vs. non-NOx) leading to the formation of SOA in the atmosphere. Updated tables for the identity and fragmentation of SOA molecular tracers and for mass fractions of four biogenic class types (isoprene, mooterpenes, sesquiterpenes, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol) and two anthropogenic class types (aromatic hydrocarbons and 2-ring PAHs) are given.

Purpose/Objective:

The National Exposure Research Laboratory’s (NERL’s) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD’s research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EPA’s strategic plan. More specifically, our division conducts research to characterize the movement of pollutants from the source to contact with humans. Our multidisciplinary research program produces Methods, Measurements, and Models to identify relationships between and characterize processes that link source emissions, environmental concentrations, human exposures, and target-tissue dose. The impact of these tools is improved regulatory programs and policies for EPA.

URLs/Downloads:

International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry   Exit

FINAL FINAL LEWANDOWSKI ET AL MANUSCRIPT ISEAC-37 REVISION 3.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 268.198 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 10/22/2013
Completion Date: 10/22/2013
Record Last Revised: 09/10/2014
Record Created: 10/22/2013
Record Released: 10/22/2013
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 261779

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LAB

HUMAN EXPOSURE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES DIVISION

PROCESS MODELING RESEARCH BRANCH