EPA Science Inventory

Influence of Inorganic Ions and Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

Citation:

Description:

In this study, influence of solution chemistries to the transport properties (aggregation and attachment behavior) of human adenovirus (HAdV) was investigated. Results showed isoelectric point (IEP) of HAdV in different salt conditions varied minimally, and it ranged from pH 3.5 to 4.0. However, the presence of divalent cation and anion significantly affect the zeta potential (ZP) of HAdV in higher pH. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed that the radii of viruses increased significantly at the pH near its IEP. No aggregation of HAdV was observed when NaCl concentration increased from 1mM to 100mM. One mM of divalent cation (Ca2+ and Mg2+) did not increase the radii of virus and the radii only increased slightly (from 120nm to 170nm) when the concentration of divalent cation increased to 50mM. These results show that aggregated form of HAdV under both fresh- and salt-water environment is very unlikely. No sorption of HAdV to quartz sand was observed when only NaCl was present in the solution. The Freundlich sorption constant of HAdV and quartz sand ranged from 17 to 24 ml/g to the presence of CalCl2 and NaSO4. Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory can generally provide a correct qualitative prediction of the sorption trend in the sorption isotherm experiment. This is the first study to report the influence of inorganic ions on aggregation and sorption behaviors of HAdV, and to apply DLVO theory to describe interaction energy between HAdV and sand particles.

Purpose/Objective:

Poster presentation at the American Society of Microbiology 2012 Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA.

URLs/Downloads:

http://www.asm.org/   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/POSTER)
Start Date: 06/19/2012
Completion Date: 06/19/2012
Record Last Revised: 12/20/2012
Record Created: 09/06/2012
Record Released: 09/06/2012
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 246071

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LAB

ECOSYSTEMS RESEARCH DIVISION