EPA Science Inventory

A comparison of the temporally integrated monitoring of ecosystems and Adirondack Long Term-Monitoring programs in the Adirondack Mountain region of New Yrok

Citation:

Civerolo, K. L., K. M. Roy, J. L. STODDARD, AND G. Sistla. A comparison of the temporally integrated monitoring of ecosystems and Adirondack Long Term-Monitoring programs in the Adirondack Mountain region of New Yrok. WATER, AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION:FOCUS. Springer, New York, NY, 222:285-296, (2011).

Description:

This paper compares lake chemistry in the Adirondack region of New York measured by the Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) and Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) programs by examining the data from six lakes common to both programs. Both programs were initiated in the early 1990s to track the efficacy of emission reduction policies and to assess the full impacts of acid deposition on surface water chemistry. They now serve to inform on the emerging chemical recovery of these waters. The Adirondack TIME program utilizes a probability-based approach to assess chronic acidification in a population of lakes using one summer sample per year. The ALTM attempts to track changes in both chronic and episodic acidification across a gradient of lake types using monthly samples. The ALTM project has two important attributes that contrast with the TIME program in the Adirondacks: higher temporal resolution (monthly versus once during the summer or fall) and speciation of aluminum. In particular, the ALTM program provides inorganic monomeric aluminum (AlIM), the fraction of Al that is most toxic. The monthly sampling of the ALTM program includes the spring snowmelt period when acid-neutralizing capacity and pH are near their lowest and Al levels are near their highest. We compare chemistry trends (1992–2008) for sulfate, nitrate, base cations, dissolved organic carbon, hydrogen ion, acid neutralizing capacity, and Al for the six lakes common to both programs. We also compare relatively high springtime AlIM concentrations from the ALTM with relatively low summertime total Al concentrations from the TIME, showing that the ALTM program provides a more biologically relevant indicator of the effects of acid deposition, illustrating the value of the complementary monitoring efforts in the Adirondack region.

Purpose/Objective:

This paper compares lake chemistry in the Adirondack region of New York measured by the Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) and Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) programs by examining the data from six lakes common to both programs.

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 05/01/2011
Completion Date: 05/01/2011
Record Last Revised: 10/22/2012
Record Created: 09/27/2011
Record Released: 09/27/2011
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 238484

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LAB

WESTERN ECOLOGY DIVISION

FRESHWATER ECOLOGY BRANCH