EPA Science Inventory

Silver Nanopartilces After Zebrafish Development and Larval Behavior: Distinct Roles for Particle Size, Coating and Composition

Citation:

Powers, C., T. A. Slotkin, F. J. Seidler, AND A. R. Badireddy. Silver Nanopartilces After Zebrafish Development and Larval Behavior: Distinct Roles for Particle Size, Coating and Composition. NEUROTOXICOLOGY AND TERATOLOGY. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, 33(6):708-714, (2011).

Description:

Background: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) act as antibacterials by releasing monovalent silver (Ag+) and are increasingly used in consumer products, thus elevating exposures in human and environmental populations. In vitro models indicate that AgNPs are likely to be developmental neurotoxicants with actions distinct from those of Ag+. Objectives and Methods: We exposed developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) to Ag+ or AgNPs on days 0-5 post-fertilization and evaluated hatching, morphology, survival, and swim bladder inflation. Larval swimming behavior and responses to different lighting conditions were assessed 24 hr after the termination of exposure. Comparisons were made with AgNPs of different sizes and coatings: 10 nm citratecoated AgNP (AgNP-C), and 10 or 50 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated AgNPs (AgNP-PVP). Results: Ag+ and AgNP-C delayed hatching to a similar extent but Ag+ was more effective in slowing swim bladder inflation, and elicited greater dysmorphology and mortality. In behavioral assessments, Ag+exposed fish were hyperresponsive to light changes, whereas AgNP-C exposed fish showed normal responses. Neither of the AgNP-PVPs affected survival or morphology but both evoked significant changes in swimming responses to light in ways that were distinct from Ag+ and each other. The smaller AgNP-PVP caused overall hypoactivity whereas the larger caused hyperactivity. Conclusions: AgNPs are less potent than Ag+ with respect to dysmorphology and loss of viability, but nevertheless produce neurobehavioral effects that highly depend on particle coating and size, rather than just reflecting the release of Ag+. Different AgNP formulations are thus likely to produce distinct patterns of developmental neurotoxicity.

Purpose/Objective:

These results indicate that nanoparticles produce effects on developing fish embryos that are distinct from the toxicity of the metal composing those particles. The data also indiate that silver and some silver nanoparticles may have neurodevelopmental toxicity potential.

URLs/Downloads:

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 11/16/2011
Completion Date: 11/16/2011
Record Last Revised: 10/22/2012
Record Created: 12/06/2010
Record Released: 12/06/2010
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 231749

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LAB

INTEGRATED SYSTEMS TOXICOLOGY DIVISION

GENETIC AND CELLULAR TOXICOLOGY BRANCH