EPA Science Inventory

Inflammatory Effects of Woodsmoke Exposure among Wildland Firefighters Working at Prescribed Burns at the Savannah River Site, SC

Citation:

Hejl, A., O. Adetona, D. Diaz-Sanchez, Jackie Carter, A. Commodore, S. Rathbun, AND L. Naeher. Inflammatory Effects of Woodsmoke Exposure among Wildland Firefighters Working at Prescribed Burns at the Savannah River Site, SC. JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HYGIENE. Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, 10(4):173-180, (2013).

Description:

Objectives: Wildland firefighters in the United States are occupationally exposed to high levels of woodsmoke. Results from experimental studies show that exposure to woodsmoke induces inflammation. Therefore, a study was conducted to investigate the effect of occupational woodsmoke exposure on inflammatory biomarkers in firefighters working at prescribed burns. Methods: Twelve United States Forest Service wildland firefighters at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina volunteered to give blood samples during 4 prescribed burns between February and March, 2011. Twenty-four paired (pre- and post-work shift) blood samples were collected using dried blood spot method to facilitate repeated sample collection. Inflammatory biomarker concentrations in blood samples were measured using the Meso Scale Discovery multi-spot assay system. Additionally, concurrent personal PM2.5 and CO monitoring of firefighters was conducted. Linear mixed models were used to test whether cross-work shift differences occurred in the following inflammatory biomarkers—IL-1β, IL-8, CRP, SAA, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. Results: IL-8 showed a significant cross-work shift difference as indicated by a post/pre-work shift ratio of 1.70 (95% CL: 1.35, 2.13; p=0.0012). Concentrations of IL-8, CRP, and ICAM-1 increased in > 50% of samples across work shift. Firefighters who lighted fires as opposed to other work tasks had the largest cross-work shift increase in IL-8. Conclusions: A significant cross-work shift increase in IL-8 in blood samples was observed in healthy wildland firefighters working at prescribed burns. Further research is needed to understand the physiological responses underlying the adverse effects of woodsmoke exposure, and the dose-response relationship between woodsmoke exposure and inflammatory responses.

Purpose/Objective:

Exposure to wildfire has been reported to impact both cardiac and respiratory health. Monitoring exposure and determining changes due to wildfire at the individual level has been problematic. This is the first to use the dried blood spot technique to demonstrate changes in blood inflammatory biomarker concentrations in wildland firefighters exposed to woodsmoke.

URLs/Downloads:

EPHD-13-015-ABSTRACT.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 240.821 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 08/22/2013
Completion Date: 08/22/2013
Record Last Revised: 10/28/2013
Record Created: 08/22/2013
Record Released: 08/22/2013
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 259128

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LAB

ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION

CLINICAL RESEARCH BRANCH