EPA Science Inventory

Fetal programming and environmental exposures: Implications for prenatal care and preterm birth

Citation:

Schug, T., A. Erlebacher, S. Leibowitz, L. Ma, L. Muglia, O. Rando, J. Rogers, R. Romero, F. vom Saal, AND D. Wise. Fetal programming and environmental exposures: Implications for prenatal care and preterm birth. ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. New York Academy of Sciences, 1276:37-46, (2012).

Description:

Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs from uterine tissue, the placenta, the maternal blood supply, and other sources. Recent evidence has made clear that the process is not based entirely on genetics, but rather on a delicate series of interactions between genes and the environment. It is likely that epigenctic (“above the genome”) changes are responsible for modifying gene expression in the developing fetus, and these modifications can have long-lasting health impacts. Determining which epigenetic regulators are most vital in embryonic development will improve pregnancy outcomes and our ability to treat and prevent disorders that emerge later in life. “Fetal Programming and Environmental Exposures: Implications for Prenatal Care and Preterm Birth’ began with a keynote address by Frederick vom Saal, who explained that low-level exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) perturbs hormone systems in utero and can have negative effects on fetal development. vom Saal presented data on the LOC bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking compound found in many plastics. He suggested that low-dose exposure to LOCs can alter the development process and enhance chances of acquiring adult diseases, such as breastcancer, diabetes, and even developmental disorders such as attention deficit disorder (ADHD).’

Purpose/Objective:

Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs from uterine tissue, the placenta, the maternal blood supply, and other sources. Recent evidence has made clear that the process is not based entirely on genetics, but rather on a delicate series of interactions between genes and the environment.

URLs/Downloads:

doi:1111/nyas12003   Exit

TAD-13-032-ABSTRACT.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 400.964 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 12/31/2012
Completion Date: 12/31/2012
Record Last Revised: 03/18/2013
Record Created: 03/05/2013
Record Released: 03/05/2013
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 252911

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LAB

TOXICOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIVISION