Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

EPA's Report on the Environment: External Review Draft

Quantity of RCRA Hazardous Waste Generated and Managed



Note to reviewers of this draft revised ROE: This indicator reflects data through 2009. EPA anticipates updating this indicator in 2014.

  • Learn more about how to use this interactive exhibit
  • Save the complete indicator as a printer-friendly PDF
  • Download this image
  • Download data for this exhibit

Click the legend to turn layers on or off. Hover your mouse over the display to reveal data.

  • Learn more about how to use this interactive exhibit
  • Save the complete indicator as a printer-friendly PDF
  • Download this image
  • Download data for this exhibit

Click the legend to turn layers on or off. To zoom in on the very small land treatment and application category, turn the other two layers off. Hover your mouse over the display to reveal data.

  • Learn more about how to use this interactive exhibit
  • Save the complete indicator as a printer-friendly PDF
  • Download this image
  • Download data for this exhibit

Click the legend to turn layers on or off. Hover your mouse over the display to reveal data.

Introduction

Hazardous waste is solid waste with a chemical composition or other property that makes it capable of causing illness, death, or some other harm to humans, plants, animals, and ecosystems when mismanaged or released into the environment. Prior to the 1976 enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), uncontrolled dumping of wastes, including hazardous wastes, was commonplace, with numerous entities handling and disposing of these materials. Some of this hazardous waste was co-disposed with non-hazardous waste (e.g., municipal solid waste). Landfills and surface impoundments containing these materials were originally unlined and uncovered, resulting in contaminated ground water, surface water, air, and soil. Even with current tight control of hazardous wastes from generation to disposal, the potential exists for accidents that could result in the release of hazardous wastes and their hazardous constituents into the environment. Through RCRA and the subsequent 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments, Congress sought to better control waste management and disposal and to conserve valuable materials and energy resources.

Facilities whose industrial processes and other actions create hazardous waste are RCRA hazardous waste generators. Facilities that treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes are termed RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs). Some hazardous waste generators treat, store, and dispose of their hazardous waste onsite, while others ship their waste to TSDFs. Most hazardous wastes (excluding hazardous wastewaters) are eventually disposed in landfills, surface impoundments, land application units, or by deep well injection. All hazardous wastes that are land-disposed must meet certain treatment standards required by the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions prior to disposal.

Beyond the potential environmental impacts of hazardous waste disposal, patterns in hazardous waste generation reflect a component of the total materials a society creates and uses, which is an important aspect of sustainability. Generally speaking, as a society creates and consumes more materials, it demands more resources (e.g., water, energy, minerals, land) and generates greater quantities of pollutants and waste. In the U.S., more than 90 percent of the raw materials extracted from the environment, transported, and processed are eventually discharged as waste or atmospheric emissions (Fiksel, 2006).

Historically, economic growth and increased prosperity have been correlated with increased material consumption (Fiksel, 2009). An important goal of sustainable development is a reduction in material use—particularly the use of hazardous materials—without a reduction in economic well-being. One way to track material use reduction is to look at nationwide “waste material intensity,” which can be measured in terms of waste generation per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product (GDP) (i.e., the total value of all goods and services produced in the U.S.). In the context of hazardous waste, lower measures of intensity imply that people are using hazardous materials more efficiently, switching to less hazardous materials and production processes, or both. By developing more environmentally friendly products and using hazardous materials more efficiently, society at large can realize cost savings and improve ecological and human health.

This indicator examines trends over time in the quantity of RCRA hazardous waste generated and managed (Exhibits 1 and 2), as well as the intensity of hazardous waste generation (Exhibit 3). In partnership with the states, EPA collects extensive data on the RCRA hazardous waste generation and management practices of TSDFs and large quantity generators (facilities that, in any single calendar month, generate 2,200 pounds or more of RCRA hazardous waste, more than 2.2 pounds of RCRA acute hazardous waste, or more than 220 pounds of spill cleanup material contaminated with RCRA acute hazardous waste). These data have been collected every two years following consistent methods since 2001. Exhibit 3 compares RCRA hazardous waste generation trends with the official U.S. population and real (inflation-adjusted) GDP. These data are indexed such that 2001 equals 1, which allows all quantities to be plotted on the same scale.

What the Data Show

Over the course of five reporting cycles (2001–2009), the quantity of RCRA hazardous waste generated in the U.S. ranged from 20.1 million tons (MT) in 2003 to 28.8 MT in 2005 (Exhibit 1). The vast majority of hazardous wastes are disposed on land or underground, with smaller proportions sent for metal, solvent, or other material recovery; processed for energy recovery; or stored for future disposal. Note that because some wastes can go through multiple management steps, the individual management categories do not sum to the total quantity of RCRA hazardous waste generated. For example, RCRA regulations require that all hazardous waste must be treated to meet technology-based land disposal treatment standards before it is placed in or on the ground, unless it already meets those standards as generated. To minimize double-counting, the quantities of waste stored, bulked, transferred, or disposed by landfill, land treatment, or land application after treatment are not included in the total quantity generated, but are shown in the “Disposed” section of Exhibit 1 (along with wastes disposed by deep well injection).

From 2001 to 2009, the quantity of RCRA hazardous waste ultimately disposed to the land ranged from 16.1 to 24.3 MT (Exhibit 2). During this time, deep well injection consistently accounted for 90 to 92 percent of all RCRA hazardous wastes disposed on land. This category also accounted for most of the year-to-year variation in total hazardous waste managed. The proportion disposed in landfills or surface impoundments that became landfills ranged between 8 and 10 percent, while the land application and land treatment categories represented a very small percentage of hazardous waste disposed on land (0.12 percent or less) over the five reporting cycles.

Between 2001 and 2009, the U.S. economy grew by 12 percent as measured by real GDP, and the U.S. population grew by 8 percent. Total RCRA hazardous waste generation was 1 percent higher in 2009 than in 2001, but it fluctuated more widely in the intervening years. Comparing 2009 with 2001, RCRA hazardous waste generation per capita decreased by 6 percent, while RCRA hazardous waste generation per dollar of GDP decreased by 10 percent (Exhibit 3).

Limitations

  • Data are not collected directly from small quantity generators, but some wastes coming from these sources are included in the RCRA hazardous waste management data from TSDFs that receive the wastes.
  • Data are limited to wastes referred to as “RCRA hazardous waste,” which are either specifically listed as hazardous or meet specific ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity criteria found in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations Title 40, Part 261. Materials that are not solid wastes, whether hazardous or not, are not regulated by RCRA, and therefore are not included in the data summarized here.
  • States have the authority to designate additional wastes as hazardous under RCRA, beyond those designated in the national program. State-designated hazardous wastes are not tracked by EPA or reflected in the aggregated information presented.
  • The comparability of year-to-year quantities of RCRA hazardous waste generated and managed can be influenced by factors such as delisting waste streams (i.e., determining that a particular listed waste stream coming from a particular facility is not hazardous) or removing the hazardous characteristic of a waste stream (e.g., treatment of hazardous waste by generators in elementary neutralization units).
  • Most hazardous waste generated in the U.S. is in the form of wastewater. With the exception of hazardous wastewater disposed using underground injection, hazardous wastewaters are not included in this indicator. If a solid material such as sludge is generated from the treatment of hazardous wastewaters, and if that material is considered “RCRA hazardous waste,” it will be managed under RCRA hazardous waste regulations.
  • In developing this RCRA hazardous waste indicator and the National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Reports (e.g., U.S. EPA, 2010), EPA uses the same data reported by facilities in their Hazardous Waste Report Forms (e.g., U.S. EPA, 2009). Note, however, that the methods used to analyze the data in each of these data sources are different. For example, this RCRA hazardous waste indicator only includes nonwastewaters (except wastewaters managed by underground injection), while the National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Reports include both nonwastewaters and wastewaters. As a result, there are differences in the total quantities of waste presented in each of these data sources.
  • Exhibit 3 does not necessarily indicate the extent to which RCRA hazardous waste is being generated and managed at environmentally “sustainable” levels (i.e., levels that will not adversely impact the environment for future generations).

Data Sources

Exhibits 1 and 2 are based on data collected by EPA in Hazardous Waste Report Forms (also known as Biennial Report or BR forms) (e.g., U.S. EPA, 2009) for reporting years 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009. The data can be found in EPA’s RCRAInfo database (U.S. EPA, 2011). Exhibit 3 incorporates GDP data obtained from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (2011) and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau (2011).

 

This page provides links to non-EPA websites that provide additional information about this topic. You will leave the EPA.gov domain, and EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of information on that non-EPA page. Providing links to a non-EPA website is not an endorsement of the other site or the information it contains by EPA or any of its employees. Also, be aware that the privacy protection provided on the EPA.gov domain (see Privacy and Security Notice) may not be available at the external link. Exit EPA Disclaimer

You will need the free Adobe Reader to view some of the files on this page. See EPA's PDF page to learn more.


Jump to main content.