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Office of the Director Publications: 2009

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This page lists publication titles, citations and abstracts produced by NERL's Office of the Director for the year 2009, organized by Publication Type. Your search has returned 8 Matching Entries.

See also Office of the Director citations with abstracts: 1999,  2000,  2001,  2002,  2003,  2004,  2005,  2006,  2007,  2008,  2009

Technical Information Manager: Janice Sims - (706)-355-8011 or sims.janice@epa.gov

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Presented/Published
JOURNAL Exposure as Part of a Systems Approach for Assessing Risk 04/08/2009
SHELDON, L. S. AND E. A. COHEN-HUBAL. Exposure as Part of a Systems Approach for Assessing Risk. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Research Triangle Park, NC, 117(8):1181-1184, (2009).
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is facing large challenges in managing environmental chemicals with increasingly complex requirements for assessing risk that push the limits of our current approaches. To address some of these challenges, the National Research Council (NRC) developed a new vision for toxicity testing. Although the report focused only on toxicity testing, it recognized that exposure science will play a crucial role in a new risk-based framework. In this commentary we expand on the important role of exposure science in a fully integrated system for risk assessment. We also elaborate on the exposure research needed to achieve this vision. Exposure science, when applied in an integrated systems approach for risk assessment, can be used to inform and prioritize toxicity testing, describe risks, and verify the outcomes of testing. Exposure research in several areas will be needed to achieve the NRC vision. For example, models are needed to screen chemicals based on exposure. Exposure, dose–response, and biological pathway models must be developed and linked. Advanced computational approaches are required for dose reconstruction. Monitoring methods are needed that easily measure exposure, internal dose, susceptibility, and biological outcome. Finally, population monitoring studies are needed to interpret toxicity test results in terms of real-world risk. This commentary is a call for the exposure community to step up to the challenge by developing a predictive science with the knowledge and tools for moving into the 21st century.

JOURNAL Analysis of Coupled Model Uncertainties in Source to Dose Modeling of Human Exposures to Ambient Air Pollution: A Pm2.5 Case-Study 03/01/2009
OZKAYNAK, H. A., H. C. Frey, J. M. BURKE, AND R. W. PINDER. Analysis of Coupled Model Uncertainties in Source to Dose Modeling of Human Exposures to Ambient Air Pollution: A Pm2.5 Case-Study. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, 43(9):1641-1649, (2009).
Abstract: Quantitative assessment of human exposures and health effects due to air pollution involve detailed characterization of impacts of air quality on exposure and dose. A key challenge is to integrate these three components on a consistent spatial and temporal basis taking into account linkages and feedbacks. The current state-of-practice for such assessments is to exercise emission, meteorology, air quality, exposure, and dose models separately, and to link them together by using the output of one model as input to the subsequent downstream model. Quantification of variability and uncertainty has been an important topic in the exposure assessment community for a number of years. Variability refers to differences in the value of a quantity (e.g., exposure) over time, space, or among individuals. Uncertainty refers to lack of knowledge regarding the true value of a quantity. An emerging challenge is how to quantify variability and uncertainty in integrated assessments over the source-to-dose continuum by considering contributions from individual as well as linked components. For a case study of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in North Carolina during July 2002, we characterize variability and uncertainty associated with each of the individual concentration, exposure and dose models that are linked, and use a conceptual framework to quantify and evaluate the implications of coupled model uncertainties. We find that the resulting overall uncertainties due to combined effects of both variability and uncertainty are smaller (usually by a factor of 3-4) than the crudely multiplied model-specific overall uncertainty ratios. Future research will need to examine the impact of potential dependencies among the model components by conducting a truly coupled modeling analysis.

JOURNAL Exposure Information in Environmental Health Research: Current Opportunities and Future Directions for Particulate Matter, Ozone, and Toxic Air Pollutants 01/01/2009
McKone, T. E., P. B. Ryan, AND H. A. OZKAYNAK. Exposure Information in Environmental Health Research: Current Opportunities and Future Directions for Particulate Matter, Ozone, and Toxic Air Pollutants. Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology . Nature Publishing Group, London, Uk, 19(1):30-44, (2009).
Abstract: In September 2006, scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with scientists from the academic community and state health departments convened a symposium on air pollution exposure and health in order to identify, evaluate, and improve current approaches for linking air pollution exposures to disease. This manuscript presents the key issues, challenges and recommendations identified by the exposure working group, who used cases studies of particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutant exposure to evaluate health-effects for air pollution. One of the over-arching lessons of this workshop is that obtaining better exposure information for these different health-effects studies requires both goal-setting for what is needed and mapping out the transition pathway from current capabilities to meeting these goals. Meeting our long-term goals requires definition of incremental steps that provide useful information for the interim and move us toward our long-term goals. Another over-arching theme among the three different pollutants and the different health study approaches is the need for integration among alternate exposure assessment approaches.

JOURNAL Summary and Findings of the EPA and Cdc Symposium on Air Pollution Exposure and Health 01/01/2009
OZKAYNAK, H. A., B. GLENN, J. R. Qualters, H. Strosnider, M. A. McGeehin, AND H. ZENICK. Summary and Findings of the EPA and Cdc Symposium on Air Pollution Exposure and Health. Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology . Nature Publishing Group, London, Uk, 19(1):19-29, (2009).
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) co-organized a symposium on "Air Pollution Exposure and Health" at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on September 19–20, 2006. The symposium brought together health and environmental scientists to discuss the state of the science and the cross-jurisdictional and methodological challenges in conducting air pollution epidemiology, environmental public health tracking and accountability research. The symposium was held over 2 days and consisted of technical presentations and breakout group discussions on each of the three principal themes of this meeting: (1) monitoring and exposure modeling information, (2) health effects data and (3) linkage of air quality and health data for research, tracking and accountability. This paper summarizes the symposium presentations and the conclusions and recommendations developed during the meeting. The accompanying two papers, which appear in this issue of the Journal, provide more in-depth discussion of issues pertinent to obtaining and analyzing air pollution exposure and health information. The symposium succeeded in identifying areas where there are critical gaps of knowledge in existing air pollution exposure and health information and in discovering institutional or programmatic barriers, which impede accessing and linking disparate data sets. Several suggestions and recommendations emerged from this meeting, directed toward (1) improving the utility of air monitoring data for exposure quantification, (2) improving access to and the quality of health data, (3) studying emerging air quality and health issues, (4) exploring improved or novel methods for linking data and (5) developing partnerships, building capacity and facilitating interdisciplinary communication. The meeting was successful in promoting an interdisciplinary dialogue around these issues and in formulating strategies to support these recommended activities. Finally, this symposium subsequently led to strengthening and initiating new partnerships or interactions between the EPA, CDC, States, academia and the research community at large.

PRESENTATION Case Study Applications of Human Exposure Models 09/13/2009
OZKAYNAK, H. A. Case Study Applications of Human Exposure Models. Presented at Eurotox 2009 Conference, Dresden, GERMANY, September 13 - 16, 2009.
Abstract: Scientific meeting presentation.

PRESENTATION Overview of USEPA/NERL Cooperative Agreement Research Program on Air Pollution Exposure and Health 08/27/2009
OZKAYNAK, H. A., S. E. Sarnat, J. A. Sarnat, L. Sheppard, B. Turpin, V. ISAKOV, J. L. CROOKS, P. Sampson, AND D. Rich. Overview of USEPA/NERL Cooperative Agreement Research Program on Air Pollution Exposure and Health. Presented at International Society for Environmental Epidemiology Conference, Dublin, Northern Ireland, IRELAND, August 25 - 29, 2009.
Abstract: USEPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) recently initiated a two-year Cooperative Agreement Research Program between EPA and three academic institutions: Emory University, Rutgers University and University of Washington. Under this EPA/NERL sponsored research, novel exposure assessment techniques are currently being evaluated in a complimentary and tiered fashion using several epidemiologic health studies.

PRESENTATION Iterative Use of Models and Measurements to Develop Scientific Understanding 06/18/2009
OZKAYNAK, H. A. Iterative Use of Models and Measurements to Develop Scientific Understanding. Presented at NRC Workshop on Exposure Science in the 21st Century, Washington, DC, June 18 - 19, 2009.
Abstract: Scientific meeting presentation on expsoure moels.

PUBLISHED REPORT A Conceptual Framework for U.S. Epa’s National Exposure Research Laboratory 02/01/2009
ARAUJO, R., R. S. DYER, R. C. FORTMANN, F. A. FULK, F. S. HAUCHMAN, D. T. HEGGEM, S. T. RAO, M. R. RODGERS, L. S. SHELDON, AND E. J. WEBER. A Conceptual Framework for U.S. Epa’s National Exposure Research Laboratory. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-09/003 (NTIS PB2010-103951), 2009.
Abstract: Fulfilling the U.S. EPA mission to protect human health and the environment carries with it the challenge of understanding exposures for tens of thousands of chemical contaminants, a wide range of biological stressors, and many physical stressors. The U.S. EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is uniquely positioned to address the Nation’s most challenging environmental exposure questions. Exposure science provides the Agency with the fundamental knowledge and tools necessary to assess potential exposures and risks to emerging environmental threats and to mitigate exposures to known contaminants and stressors. NERL’s combined expertise in modeling, chemistry, microbiology, ecology, molecular biology, geographic information systems, and remote sensing enables the Laboratory to bring cutting-edge research and technology to the field of exposure science.

 

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Last Updated on Wednesday, March 04, 2009
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