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Environmental Sciences Division Publications: 2000

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This page lists publication titles, citations and abstracts produced by NERL's Environmental Sciences Division for the year 2000, organized by Publication Type. Your search has returned 127 Matching Entries.

See also Environmental Sciences Division citations with abstracts: 1999,  2000,  2001,  2002,  2003,  2004,  2005,  2006,  2007,  2008,  2009

Technical Information Manager: Chris Sibert - (702) 798-2234 or sibert.christopher@epa.gov

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Presented/Published
BOOK CHAPTER Identifying Endocrine Disruptors By High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry 01/20/2000
Grange, A H. AND G W. Sovocool. Identifying Endocrine Disruptors By High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. 2000.Chapter 9, Keith, H.K.; Needham, L.L.; Eds. (ed.), Advances in Analysis of Environmental Endocrine Disruptors. ACS Symposium Series 747, Washington, DC, 133-145, (2000).
Abstract: The EPA is currently interested in human and ecosystem exposure to endocrine disruptors (1)-compounds that interfere with endogenous hormone systems. Possible endocrine disruptors in the environment include certain pesticides, industrial by-products, and pharmaceuticals. Such chemicals could be found in surface water or wells as a result of agricultural run off (2), leaching from contaminated sites (3,4), or in treated wastewater discharged from urban areas (5).
Biologically based assays are often used to screen for the presence of endocrine disruptors. While these tests are sensitive, they are non-specific and not inclusive. Cross-reactivity is common but can be an advantage when searching for unidentified endocrine disruptors.

Once a positive result is obtained from a biologically based assay, it is important to identify the compound or compounds responsible for the reactivity. Toxicological studies can then be performed for the identified chemicals. Also, when screening for a specific compound, possible cross-reactivity suggests that a more specific confirmatory technique should be applied to some fraction of the samples showing a positive result for a target analyte.

EPA PUBLISHED PROCEEDINGS Update on the Ecological Condition of the Delmarva Coastal Bays Proceedings Delmarva Coastal Bays Conference III: Tri-State Approaches to Preserving Aquatic Resources 10/02/2000
Kutz, F W., J F. Paul, AND T B. DeMoss. Update on the Ecological Condition of the Delmarva Coastal Bays Proceedings Delmarva Coastal Bays Conference III: Tri-State Approaches to Preserving Aquatic Resources. Proceedings of the 1999 Deelmarva Coastal Bays Conference, Ocean City, MD, November 12-13, 1999. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/J-00/272, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field for further information.

JOURNAL Quality Science in the Courtroom: U.S. EPA Data Quality and Peer Review Policies and Procedures Compared to the Daubert Factors 12/28/2000
Brilis, G M. AND J. Worthington. Quality Science in the Courtroom: U.S. EPA Data Quality and Peer Review Policies and Procedures Compared to the Daubert Factors. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL FORENSICS 1(4):197-203, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Pathology of Shell Disease in the Blue Lab 12/10/2000
Noga, E., L. H. Whoo, AND R. Smolowitz. Pathology of Shell Disease in the Blue Lab. JOURNAL OF FISH DISEASES 23(6):389-399, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Land Cover as a Framework for Assessing Risk of Water Pollution 12/09/2000
Wickham, J D., K. H. Riitters, R. V. O'Neill, N. Reckhow, T G. Wade, AND K B. Jones. Land Cover as a Framework for Assessing Risk of Water Pollution. AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION, WATER RESOURCES BULLETIN, AND INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION ON WATER QUALITY 36(6):1417-1422, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Ab Initio Calculated Gas-Phase Basicities of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons 12/08/2000
Aue, D. H., M. Guidoni, AND L D. Betowski. Ab Initio Calculated Gas-Phase Basicities of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ION PROCESSES 201(1-3):283-295, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Global-Scale Patterns of Forest Fragmentation 10/03/2000
Ritters, K. H., J D. Wickham, R. V. O'Neill, K B. Jones, AND E R. Smith. Global-Scale Patterns of Forest Fragmentation. CONSERVATION ECOLOGY (ON-LINE) 4(2):1-29, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL EMAP Design and River Reach File 3 (Rf3) as a Sample Frame in the Central Valley, California 09/25/2000
Hall, R. K., A R. Olsen, D. Stevens, B J. Rosenbaum, P. Husby, G. A. Wolinsky, AND D T. Heggem. EMAP Design and River Reach File 3 (Rf3) as a Sample Frame in the Central Valley, California. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT 64(1):69-80, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL An Overview of EPA's Regional Vulnerability Assessment (Reva) Program 09/15/2000
Smith, E R. An Overview of EPA's Regional Vulnerability Assessment (Reva) Program. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT 64(1):9-15, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Remote Sensing Tools Assist in Environmental Forensics Part I Traditional Tools 08/22/2000
Brilis, G M. AND C. L. Gerlach. Remote Sensing Tools Assist in Environmental Forensics Part I Traditional Tools. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL FORENSICS 1(2):63-67, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL The Geography of Ecosystem Vulnerability 08/17/2000
Wickham, J D., R. V. O'Neill, AND K B. Jones. The Geography of Ecosystem Vulnerability. LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY 15(6):495-504, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL National Land-Cover Pattern Data 08/17/2000
Ritters, K. H., J D. Wickham, J. E. Vogelmann, AND K B. Jones. National Land-Cover Pattern Data. ECOLOGY 81(2):604, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Estimation of Regional Trends in Sulfur Dioxide Over the Eastern United States 08/10/2000
Holland, D M., V. De Oliveira, L H. Cox, AND R. Smith. Estimation of Regional Trends in Sulfur Dioxide Over the Eastern United States. ENVIRONMETRICS 11(4):373-393, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL A New Design for a Lightweight Squeeze Box for Snake Field Studies 05/22/2000
Cross, C L. A New Design for a Lightweight Squeeze Box for Snake Field Studies. HERPETOLOGICAL-REVIEW 31(1):34, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL The Power of Analytical Methods for Measuring Suspected Endocrine Disrupting Compounds: A Pilot Field Study 05/04/2000
JonesLepp, T, C. L. Gerlach, AND E J. Cooter. The Power of Analytical Methods for Measuring Suspected Endocrine Disrupting Compounds: A Pilot Field Study. TRENDS IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 19(5):286-291, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Bird Communities and Habitat as Ecological Indicators of Forest Condition in Regional Monitoring 04/22/2000
Canterbury, G. E., T E. Martin, D. R. Petit, L. J. Petit, AND D F. Bradford. Bird Communities and Habitat as Ecological Indicators of Forest Condition in Regional Monitoring. CONSERVATION BIOLOGY 14(2):544 - 558, (2000).
Abstract: Ecological indicators for long-term monitoring programs are needed to detect and assess changing environmental conditions, We developed and tested community-level environmental indicators for monitoring forest bird populations and associated habitat. We surveyed 197 sampling plots in loblolly-shortleaf pine forests, spanning and area from Georgia to Virginia (U.S.A.) and representing a gradient in levels of anthropogenic disturbance. Ninety of these plots were randomly selected from a sampling grid, permitting quantitative assessment of cumulative distribution functions for bird community and habitat parameters. Species were independently classified into habitat assemblages indicating birds typical of disturbed habitat (e.g., shrubland, forest edge) and undisturbed habitat (mature forest). Relative abundances of these assemblages were used to form a bird community index-similar to the index of biotic integrity applied to aquatic systems-showing the effects of habitat disturbance on forest bird communities. Bird communities on the majority of the sample area (52-75%, 90% confidence interval) were dominated by disturbance-tolerant species. Sites dominated by mature forest species were comparatively uncommon. Habitat assemblages appeared to be particularly useful tools for environmental monitoring; individual species abundance was positively correlated with assemblage species richness, and assemblage members showed consistent responses to variations in disturbance level. To a lesser extent, component species of nesting guilds showed this pattern of cohesive responses, but those of foraging guilds did not. We also developed a habitat index based on habitat variables that predicted bird community index values. Habitat and bird community indices were strongly correlated in an independent validation dataset, suggesting that the habitat index can provide a reliable predictor of bird community status.

JOURNAL Landscape Approach for Detecting and Evaluating Change in a Semi-Arid Environment 04/21/2000
Kepner, W G., C. J. Watts, C M. Edmonds, J. K. Maingi, S. E. Marsh, AND G. Luna. Landscape Approach for Detecting and Evaluating Change in a Semi-Arid Environment. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT 64(1):179-195, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Environmental Screening of Acidic Compounds Based on Cze/Lif Detection With Gc/MS and Gc/Hrms Identification 04/18/2000
Brumley, W C., A H. Grange, V Kelliher, D B. Patterson, A. Montcalm, J. Glassman, AND J. W. Farley. Environmental Screening of Acidic Compounds Based on Cze/Lif Detection With Gc/MS and Gc/Hrms Identification. JOURNAL OF AOAC INTERNATIONAL 83(5):1059-1067, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Assessing Landscape Condition Relative to Water Resources in the Western United States: A Strategic Approach 04/12/2000
Jones, K B., D T. Heggem, T G. Wade, A C. Neale, D W. Ebert, M S. Nash, M H. Mehaffey, K A. Hermann, A R. Selle, S. Augustine, I A. Goodman, J. A. Pedersen, D Bolgrien, J. M. Vigar, D. Chiang, C. J. Lin, Y. Zhang, J Baker, AND R. VanRemortel. Assessing Landscape Condition Relative to Water Resources in the Western United States: A Strategic Approach. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT 64(1):227-245, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Assessing and Monitoring the Health of Western Rangeland Watersheds 03/29/2000
de Soyza, A. G., W G. Whitford, S. J. Turner, J. Van Zee, AND A. R. Johnson. Assessing and Monitoring the Health of Western Rangeland Watersheds. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT 64(1):153-166, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Landscape Correlates of Breeding Bird Richness Across the United States Mid-Atlantic Region 03/24/2000
Jones, K B., A C. Neale, M S. Nash, K. H. Riitters, J D. Wickham, R. V. O'Neill, AND R. D. van Remortel. Landscape Correlates of Breeding Bird Richness Across the United States Mid-Atlantic Region. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT 63(1):159-174, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Challenges in Forecasting the Long-Term Impacts of Multiple Stressors on a Mid-Atlantic Region 03/20/2000
Carpenter, D. E. AND R S. Lunetta. Challenges in Forecasting the Long-Term Impacts of Multiple Stressors on a Mid-Atlantic Region. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY 4(2):1076-1081, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

JOURNAL Application of Multi-Date Landsat 5 Tim Imagery for Wetland Identification 03/09/2000
Lunetta, R S. AND M. E. Balogh. Application of Multi-Date Landsat 5 Tim Imagery for Wetland Identification. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING AND REMOTE SENSING 65(11):1303-1310, (2000).
Abstract: Multi-temporal Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery was evaluated for the identification and monitoring of potential jurisdictional wetlands located in the states of Maryland and Delaware. A wetland map prepared from single-date TM imagery was compared to a hybrid map developed using two dates of imagery. The basic approach was to identify land-cover vegetation types using spring leaf-on imagery, and identify the location and extent of the seasonally saturated soil conditions and areas exhibiting wetland hydrology using spring leaf-off imagery. The accuracy of the wetland maps produced from both single- and multiple-date TM imagery were assessed using reference data derived from aerial photographic interpretations and field observation data. Subsequent to the merging of wetland forest and shrub categories, the overall accuracy of the wetland map produced from two dates of imagery was 88 percent compared to the 69 percent result from single-date imagery. A Kappa Test Z statistic of 5.8 indicated a significant increase in accuracy was achieved using multiple-date TM images. Wetland maps developed from multi-temporal Landsat TM imagery may potentially provide a valuable tool to supplement existing National Wetland Inventory maps for identifying the location and extent of wetlands in northern temperature regions of the United States.

JOURNAL Fish as Vectors in the Dispersal of Bythotrephes Cederstroemi Diapausing Eggs Survive Gut Passage 01/04/2000
Jarnagin, S T., B. K. Swan, AND W. C. Kerfoot. Fish as Vectors in the Dispersal of Bythotrephes Cederstroemi Diapausing Eggs Survive Gut Passage. FRESHWATER BIOLOGY 43(4):579-589, (2000).
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Inez, Kentucky Coal Slurry Spill 12/14/2000
Williams, D J. Inez, Kentucky Coal Slurry Spill. Presented at Federal Applications of Satellite Image Information-3 TASC Westfields, Chantilly, VA, December 14, 2000.
Abstract: On October 11th, 2000, a breach of a coal slurry impoundment released approximately 210 million gallons of coal slurry ( a mixture of fine coal particles, silt, clay, sand and water) into the Big Andy Branch, Wolf Creek, and Coldwater Fork. Approximately 75 river miles were affected by flood conditions due to the release of the slurry and deposition of the-slurry solids in the streams and along the stream banks. Analysis of the disaster area was accomplished using aerial photography and National Technical Means (NTM) to document the flood extent and slurry deposition boundaries. This' project served as a pilot study for the use of NTM for EPA Emergency Response informational support.

PRESENTATION A Strategy for Integrated Ecological Restoration of Riparian Buffers in the Mid-Atlantic Region 12/01/2000
Kutz, F W. AND K. W. Thornton. A Strategy for Integrated Ecological Restoration of Riparian Buffers in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Presented at Annual meeting of the MD Water Monitoring Council, Linthicum, MD, December 1, 2000.
Abstract: Increased sediments, nutrients, and other contaminants in the Mid-Atlantic region contribute to environmental problems ranging from stream degradation to possibly Pfiesteria attacks in Chesapeake Bay. Restoring riparian areas - the filters between terrestrial watersheds and aquatic ecosystems - represents a cost-effective, environmentally sound approach for reducing these contaminants loads.
This presentation describes a strategic approach to riparian buffer restoration. The goal of this strategy is to better understand from a holistic perspective how riparian areas function, particularly when placed at different locations in the watershed, build on existing restoration efforts, develop predictive tools and provide design guidance that can be used to implement watershed management and protection programs. The objectives of this initiative are to monitor, to understand, to predict and to manage riparian buffer restoration, including the myriad of scientific elements associated with this endeavor (illustrated at right).

There are three interacting elements forming the foundation for this strategy: (1) Alliance Formation - It is our belief that no one Federal or State agency has all of the resources and expertise needed to accomplish the study, evaluation, and restoration of riparian buffers. Therefore, partnerships among interested Federal, State and Local agencies must be made. These partnerships should also include corporate and non- governmental organizations. (2) Research Framework-The strategy is be built around the EPA Ecological Risk Assessment Framework to ensure ecological risks from various management activities occurring within the watershed and the Region can be estimated and incorporated in the decision making process. (3) Research Studies - Five research categories will contribute to riparian area restoration:

Targeting/characterization research will identify specific, high priority sites for intensive research, nested within a greater number of sites to characterize conditions within watersheds throughout the Mid- Atlantic region. Landscape assessment approaches may argument more traditional targeting models. Riparian configuration research, integrating surface/subsurface hydrologic, physicochemical and biological processes, will determine the extent of the area, physical-chemical characteristics, and the species composition needed to reduce contaminant loads. Configuration monitoring, including ground-level and remotely-sensed monitoring data will initially establish the baseline conditions and subsequently document the performance of different riparian area configurations. Evaluation and predictive tools will. be developed both for diagnosing problems and for predicting possible future conditions under different watershed management activities. It is absolutely imperative that programs be established to insure that restoration activities are having the desired effects. Management guidance will be provided to design the riparian area, evaluate its performance, and estimate the economic benefits of riparian area restoration at the watershed and regional scales.


PRESENTATION Monitoring Stream Condition in the Western United States 11/16/2000
Kepner, W G., J. R. Baker, D J. Chaloud, W. L. Kinney, M. E. Hamilton, AND K B. Jones. Monitoring Stream Condition in the Western United States. Presented at 32nd Annual Meeting of the Desert Fishes Council, Death Valley National Park, CA, November 16-19, 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) is a national research program to develop the tools necessary to monitor and assess the- status and trends of ecological resources. EMAP's goal is to develop the scientific understanding for translating environmental monitoring data from multiple spatial -and temporal scales into assessments of ecological condition and forecasts of the future risks to the sustainability of our natural resources. To accomplish its goals the ENIAP program has initiated a large regional aquatic study across the western United States (Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming). EMAP will combine ecological indicators (fish, macroinvertebrate and periphyton assemblages; riparian and in-stream physical habitat; water chemistry) with a statistical sampling strategy over a five-year period to demonstrate the application of core monitoring and assessment tools. It is anticipated that.information gathered from the EMAP Western Pilot Study program will assist environmental managers and decision-makers in understanding stream ecological function in relation to human influence. Additionally, we expect that EMAP monitoring data measured over time could be incorporated into large-scale trend assessments to determine the changing conditions of our nation's environment. This poster provides an overview of the sample design and indicator approach for stream sites sampled in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah.

PRESENTATION A National Program for Monitoring Stream Condition in the Western United States 11/16/2000
Baker, J. R., W G. Kepner, D J. Chaloud, W. L. Kinney, M. E. Hamilton, AND K B. Jones. A National Program for Monitoring Stream Condition in the Western United States. Presented at 32nd Annual Meeting of Desert Fishes Council, Death Valley National Park, CA, November 16-19, 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently initiated a four-year survey of streams in the Western United States as a component of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). EMAP is developing indicators to monitor and assess the condition of ecological resources at a regional or state level of scale. This is accomplished by randomly selecting sites and by obtaining a representative sample of biotic assemblages along with physical and chemical measures. These data are then used to estimate the biological integrity of the sites. Since the stream sites are randomly selected, the data collected can be used to make regional and statewide estimates of stream condition. States included in the survey are Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North,Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. An overview of the survey design, logistics, sample design and a preliminary account of fishes from stream sites sampled in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah will be presented.

PRESENTATION Pollution from Personal Actions, Activities, and Behaviors: Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment 11/14/2000
Daughton, C G. Pollution from Personal Actions, Activities, and Behaviors: Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment. Presented at Drugs in the Environment, San Diego, CA, November 14, 2000.
Abstract: Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the personal activities of individual citizens and their environment. PPCPS, in contrast to other types of pollutants, owe their origins in the environment directly to their worldwide, universal, frequent, highly dispersed, and individually small but cumulative usage by multitudes of individuals - as opposed to the larger, highly delineated, and more controllable industrial manufacturing/usage of most high- volume synthetic chemicals.
Many PPCPs (as well as their metabolites and transformation products) can enter the environment following ingestion or application by the user or administration to domestic animals. Disposal of unused/expired PPCPs in landfills and in domestic sewage is another route to the environment. 'Me aquatic environment serves as the major, ultimate receptacle for these chemicals, for which little is known with respect to actual or potential adverse effects. Domestic sewage treatment plants are not designed to remove PPCPS, and the efficiencies with which they are removed vary from nearly complete to ineffective. While PPCPs in the environment (or domestic drinking water) are not regulated, and even though their concentrations are extremely low (ng/L-@Lg/L), the consequences of exposure to multiple compounds having different as well as similar modes of action over multiple generations prompts a plethora of questions. While the environmental issues involved with antibiotics and sex steroids are the most widely recognized, numerous other therapeutic and consumer-use classes of PPCPs pose environmental concerns.

U.S. EPA and U.S. FDA are beginning to consider the many scientific issues involved with this multifaceted environmental concern. One of the most frequent questions is "So What? With therapeutic drugs, exposures of aquatic organisms are at levels far below therapeutic dosages for humans - and exposures for humans via drinking water are lower yet. So why should we be concerned even if PPCPs prove to be ubiquitous pollutants?" This question will be examined from a number of perspectives and suggestions will be offered with respect to actions regarding future direction for research and pollution prevention.

PRESENTATION Ion Composition Elucidation (Ice) for Characterization and Identification of Organic Compounds in Environmental Samples 11/12/2000
Grange, A H. AND G W. Sovocool. Ion Composition Elucidation (Ice) for Characterization and Identification of Organic Compounds in Environmental Samples. Presented at 21st SETAC Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, November 12-16, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Distribution of Sediment Mercury Concentrations in the Humboldt River Watershed 11/06/2000
Hall, R. K., S. Ellsworth, P. Husby, C. Rosamond, H. Powell, A. Lincoff, AND D T. Heggem. Distribution of Sediment Mercury Concentrations in the Humboldt River Watershed. Presented at Historic and Current Mining Activities Conference, San Francisco, CA, November 6-10, 2000.
Abstract:
In 1998 the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) required the mining industry to list all releases to the environment exceeding the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) reporting threshold. Mining activities in Arizona, California and Nevada accounted for approximately 66% (2.3 billion pounds) of the total releases nationally. Of the 57 facilities in these three states reporting toxic releases, 36 (63%) are in the State of Nevada, with 22 (38%) located in the Humboldt River watershed. Mercury releases occur from weathering of waste rock and mercury is one of the primary compounds released into the air from ore processing facilities. Mining facilities within the Humboldt reported releasing approximately 14,000 lbs of mercury into the atmosphere. Mercury was analyzed in water and stream sediment samples from 35 randomly selected sites as part of the USEPA Region IX Humboldt River Watershed Regional environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (R-EMAP) project. Mercury m stream sediment was detected at 24 (68%) of the sites wiffi concentrations ranging from 0.07 - 1.50 mg/kg. The Lowest Effects Level for aquatic organism for mercury of 0.2 mg/kg was exceeded at 6 (17%) sites located in tributaries to the Humboldt River west of Winnemucca, and the Carlin Trend area and in tributaries to the Mary, s River, Rock Creek and Reese River. Mercury in the water column was below the detection limit of 0. I ug/L in all 35 samples. This study indicates mercury is wide spread throughout the watershed in low to moderate levels.
The highest concentrations are associated with general geology and mining.


PRESENTATION Movement of Trichloroethylene in Caliche 11/05/2000
Schumacher, B A., K. E. Synder, M. M. Minnich, AND K AlKhafaji. Movement of Trichloroethylene in Caliche. Presented at Annual Soil Science Society of America Meeting, Minneapolis, MN, November 5-9, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Historical Patterns of Habitat Changes and Genetic Divergence in the Desert and Short Horned Lizards 10/20/2000
Jones, K B. Historical Patterns of Habitat Changes and Genetic Divergence in the Desert and Short Horned Lizards. Presented at Annual Horne Lizard Conservation Society Symposium, Portal, AZ, October 20-21, 2000.
Abstract: Historical environmental change is thought to have played an important role in the diversification of the biota of western North America. Many patterns of diversification have been associated with glacial-interglacial cycles of the latest Pleistocene. To evaluate the relative influence of old and recent historical environmental change on lineage diversification, mitochondrial DNA of the short-horned lizard (Phrynosoma douglasi) and the desert homed lizard (Phrynosoma platyrhinos) were analyzed. Both species are widespread and have relatively old histories in western North America. The short-horned and desert homed lizards demonstrated multiple scales of lineage diversification representing responses to relatively old and recent historical environmental change. Deep levels of divergence in short-homed lizards were structured geographically among Kuchler Physiographic regions and were temporally concordant with the late Tertiary uplift of the western North American cordillera. The desert homed lizard demonstrated a deep divergence between the southern Sonoran Desert and the remainder of the species' range. The depth of lineage diversity in both lizards was concordant with a model of habitat change during the last glacial maximum. Regions that maintained large patches of suitable habitat during the last glacial maximum had deep levels of divergence whereas regions that lost large areas of suitable habitat had shallow levels of within-region divergence. The phylogeographic patterns of the two species, and results of simulated habitat change, do not support a model of mass habitat shift to the south in response to glaciation. Rather, results of this study suggest that suitable habitats and populations persisted in many areas within the current ranges of both species ranges during the last glacial maximum, although the distribution of the desert homed lizard was more limited.


PRESENTATION Advanced Remote Sensing Monitoring of Mine Waste 09/19/2000
Mace, T H. AND J G. Lyon. Advanced Remote Sensing Monitoring of Mine Waste. Presented at U.S. EPA Environmental Monitoring Technology Conference, Boston, MA, September 19-20, 2000.
Abstract: The OEI-EAD and NERL-ESD have been cooperating on development of monitoring technologies and research to better use remote sensor-derived information and to ultimately disseminate that information to users. This work has focused on NASA'S airborne advanced remote sensor systems in the arid western US, and the utility of using space borne versions of the sensors to provide monitoring information of mine and extractive industry wastes. Aa new cooperative effort focused on perchlorate identification will also be addressed.

PRESENTATION Landscape Ecology Indicator Monitoring Methods Development 09/19/2000
Jones, K B., A C. Neale, AND J G. Lyon. Landscape Ecology Indicator Monitoring Methods Development. Presented at US EPA Environmental Monitoring Technology Conference, Boston, MA, September 19-20, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Remote Sensing in Detecting Buried Munitions from World War I 09/19/2000
Slonecker, E T. AND J G. Lyon. Remote Sensing in Detecting Buried Munitions from World War I. Presented at US EPA Environmental Monitoring Technology Conference, Boston, MA, September 19-20, 2000.
Abstract:
During World War I, The American University in Washington D.C. was used by the U.S. Army as an experiment station for the development and testing of a variety of battlefield munitions including chemical weapons such as Mustard Gas, Phosgene, Ricin and Lewisite, among others. After the end of the War in 1918, many of the weapons and chemical agents were haphazardly buried in and around the American University testing area which is now known as Spring Valley. In 1993, chemical-laden mortar shells were accidentally unearthed by a construction crew setting off a series of investigations that, to date, has cost over 40 million dollars and is still on-going. The Environmental Photographic Interpretation Center (EPIC) is supporting the on-going Superfund investigation efforts using remote sensing technology. Both conventional and research applications of remotely sensed imagery, along with GIS database developments, are playing a critical role in the discovery and removal of chemical weapons and contamination in this area. This presentation will document the EPIC's use of historical imagery, GIS, photogrammetry and hyperspectral remote sensing in locating and removing these weapons from the environment.





PRESENTATION Empact: the Las Vegas Interagency Pilot Program 09/19/2000
Lyon, J G., J. Moore, AND P A. Arberg. Empact: the Las Vegas Interagency Pilot Program. Presented at U.S. EPA National Environmental Monitoring Technology Conference, Boston, MA, September 19-20, 2000.
Abstract: ENPACT: The Las Vegas Interagency Pilot Project
The Las Vegas Interagency Pilot Project of the EMPACT program has involved eleven efforts. These efforts are described in brief on the poster presentation. They include: Las Vegas Environmental Monitoring Inventory, the Quality of Life in Las Vegas, Livable Communities and Citizen Perceptions, Communication Plan for Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking, EMPACT-Las Vegas Website, Smart Growth Conference, Visibility Project, LTV Modeling, LTV Monitoring, LTV Risk Communication, and Long Term Vision for Environmental Monitoring in Las Vegas.

PRESENTATION Landscape Characterization & Non-Point Source Nitrogen Modeling in Support of Tmdl Development in the Neuse River Basin, Nc 09/19/2000
Lunetta, R S., J. Ediriwickrema, C. T. Garten, R. Green, J. Iiames, D. M. Johnson, J G. Lyon, A. McKerrow, AND D Pilant. Landscape Characterization & Non-Point Source Nitrogen Modeling in Support of Tmdl Development in the Neuse River Basin, Nc. Presented at US EPA Environmental Monitoring Technology Conference, Boston, MA, September 19-20, 2000.
Abstract:
Pfesteria-like toxic- blooms have been implicated as the causative agent responsible for numerous outbreaks of fish lesions and fish kills in the Mid-Atlantic and southeastern U.S. An increase in frequency, intensity, and severity of toxic blooms in recent years is thought to be a result of surface water nutrient enrichment, mediated by changing land-use practices. an coal of this research is to apply Im-id-cover/use information to quantify the extent and distribution of terrestrial sources of nitrogen contributing tor harmful algal blooms add possible Pfiesteria outbreaks. This is being accomplished by coupling high resolution land-cover data sets with-G1S-based nutrient models that will be calibrated and validated using a stratified subset of Neuse River Basin (NRB) sub-watersheds. A high resolution land-cover/use data set has been developed using advanced satellite based remote sensor systems. These include use of the new SPOT 4 (XS) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM') remote sensor systems to provide basin-wide land cover/use data at 0.4 ha. and 5.8 ha. minimum mapping units (MMU) or landscape patches. Also, use of the new IKONOS sub-meter stereo imagery was made for the characterization of riparian zone vegetation structure- NRB modeling includes the development and implementation of a nitrogen mass balance model to quantify patch specific potential nitrogen sources, coupled with a hydrologic model for routing nitrogen to water courses based event driven precipitation.

PRESENTATION Landscape Metrics for Measurements and Modeling Over Large Areas 09/19/2000
Jones, K B. AND J G. Lyon. Landscape Metrics for Measurements and Modeling Over Large Areas. Presented at US EPA Environmental Monitoring Technology Conference, Boston, MA, September 19-20, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Spectral Monitoring of Fugitive Contaminants in the Environment 09/19/2000
Slonecker, E T. AND J G. Lyon. Spectral Monitoring of Fugitive Contaminants in the Environment. Presented at US EPA Environmental Monitoring Technology Conference, Boston, MA, September 19-20, 2000.
Abstract: The accidental or intentional release of hazardous chemical substances into the environment is an inevitable consequence of anthropogenic activity. The detection, monitoring and remediation of fugitive contaminants is a major risk factor for human and ecological health and is regulated by several major environmental statutes such as the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, among others. Hazardous waste and related issues cost the Nation billions of dollars annually, and involves thousands of active and abandoned hazardous waste facilities. Monitoring the extent and distribution of contaminants in the soil, water and vegetation is most often accomplished by way of in situ sampling and time-consuming and costly laboratory analysis methods. However, recent advances in remote sensing science, using hyperspectral imaging technology, allow the collection of hundreds of very narrow bandwidth channels across the solar reflected spectrum and can be analyzed using standard spectroscopic analysis techniques. The result is that many substances can now be identified based on their unique spectral fingerprint in the solar reflected spectrum. However, outside the laboratory, pure substances are rare and most fugitive contaminants exist in a matrix of materials that includes vegetation coverage, which is often a dominant factor from a landscape or overhead remote sensing perspective. The ability to detect contaminants in the environment through changes in vegetation reflectance would be a major advance in environmental monitoring technology. This presentation will discuss past and future use of hyperspectral remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy to identify hazardous materials in the environment through detection of changes in vegetation reflectance at known hazardous waste sites.

PRESENTATION Comparison of Two Indices of Benthic Community Condition in Chesapeake Bay 09/18/2000
Ranasinghe, J. A., D. E. Russell, F W. Kutz, J. B. Frithsen, J F. Paul, R. Batiuk, J. L. Hyland, J. Scott, AND D. M. Dauer. Comparison of Two Indices of Benthic Community Condition in Chesapeake Bay. Presented at Environmetrics, Las Vegas, NV, September 18-20, 2000.
Abstract: The Chesapeake Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity (B-IBI) and the EMAP-VP Benthic Index were applied to samples from 239 sites in Chesapeake Bay. The B-IBI weights several community measures equally and uses a simple scoring system while the EMAP-VP Benthic Index uses discriminant function coefficients to weight variable contributions. The two indices agreed on degraded or undegraded classifications for benthos at 85% of these sites. The indices were strongly associated with Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.78 and 0.76, respectively. The 35 sites where the indices disagreed were scattered in different habitats throughout the Bay, and were most often located between areas with predominantly degraded and predominantly undegraded sites. Many of the classification disagreements were at sites with index values close to, but on opposite sides of, the degraded-undegraded thresholds. We prefer using the B-IBI because there were indications that the EMAP-VP index did not detect some subtle degradation effects, the B-IBI incorporates information from more ecological categories, and the B-IBI is easily decomposed to identify community attributes contributing to degraded site classifications.

PRESENTATION Performance Verification of Field Analytical Technologies That Can Assist in Site Characterization and Monitoring Activities 09/18/2000
Koglin, E N., R. A. Jenkins, A. B. Dindal, C. K. Bayne, W. Einfeld, AND D. Crumbling. Performance Verification of Field Analytical Technologies That Can Assist in Site Characterization and Monitoring Activities. Presented at ConSoil 2000, Leipzig, Germany, September 18-22, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Movement Patterns of the Eastern Cottonmouth in a Natural and An Anthropogenic Marsh Habitat in Southeastern Virginia 09/12/2000
Cross, C L. Movement Patterns of the Eastern Cottonmouth in a Natural and An Anthropogenic Marsh Habitat in Southeastern Virginia. Presented at 7th Annual Conference of the Wildlife Society, Nashville, TN, September 12, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Post-Construction Seedbank Change (1985 1997) in a Restored Coastal Freshwater Marsh (Lake Erie, USA) 09/04/2000
Lopez, R D. AND C. B. Davis. Post-Construction Seedbank Change (1985 1997) in a Restored Coastal Freshwater Marsh (Lake Erie, USA). Presented at Society of Ecological Restoration International Conference, Liverpool, United Kingdom, September 4-7, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION The Importance of Spatial Accuracy for Chemical Information Management 08/20/2000
Brilis, G M. The Importance of Spatial Accuracy for Chemical Information Management. Presented at 220th ACS National Meeting, Washington, DC, August 20-24, 2000.
Abstract: Information about chemicals can be critical to making timely decisions. The results of these decisions may not be realized for many years. In order to increase the value of chemical information and to create and utilize meaningful environmental models, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed and implemented a Locational Data Policy (LDP). The intent of this policy is to extend environmental analyses and allow chemical and other data to be integrated based upon location, thereby promoting the enhanced use of EPA's extensive data resources for cross-media environmental analyses and management decisions.
The EPA's new initiative, the Geographic Information Systems - Quality Assurance Team (GIS-QA), is committed to working with all organizations to ensure that spatially related tools, such as the LDP, are supported for use in gathering chemical data. An overview of the EPA GIS-QA Team and primary components of the Locational Data Policy will be presented. Internet sites will be provided for reference.

PRESENTATION An Auditing Framework to Substantiate Electronic Recordkeeping Practices 08/20/2000
Brilis, G M. An Auditing Framework to Substantiate Electronic Recordkeeping Practices. Presented at 220th ACS National Meeting, Washington, DC, August 20-24, 2000.
Abstract: Quality assurance audits of computer systems help to ensure that the end data meet the needs of the user. Increasingly complex systems require the stepwise procedures outlined below.
The areas reviewed in this paper include both technical and evidentiary criteria. Increasingly, there has been a trend to use computers in data acquisition and transmission. Many existing audit programs do not address issues regarding integrity of computer-resident data. The U.S. EPA's Office of Information Resource Management (OIRM) addressed the issue of integrity of laboratory data through the development of Good Automated Laboratory Practices (GALP).

In order to assist quality assurance professionals as well as others interested in conducting audits of computer systems, the authors have developed an audit approach based on requirements described in the GALP. The requirements of the GALP have been modified and amended to be applicable to automated onsite computer systems. The checklist serves two purposes. The first is an auditing aid. The second is as documentary evidence of awareness of computer related QA issues.


PRESENTATION Pixel-Level Land Use Change Models: A Comparative Approach 08/19/2000
Matheny, R W. AND K. A. Hanisak. Pixel-Level Land Use Change Models: A Comparative Approach. Presented at 37th Annual Conference of the Urban and Regional Systems Association, Orlando, FL, August 19-23, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Logistic Regression Techniques Applied to Pixilated Land Use Change Modeling 08/19/2000
Matheny, R W. AND D. Weat. Logistic Regression Techniques Applied to Pixilated Land Use Change Modeling. Presented at Urban Regional Information Systems Annual Conference and Exposition, Orlando, FL, August 19-23, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Spatial Prediction of Fine Particulate Matter 08/14/2000
Holland, D M. AND M. Fuentes. Spatial Prediction of Fine Particulate Matter. Presented at 2000 Proceedings of the Section on Statistics and the Environment. Annual Meeting of the American Statistical Association, Indianapolis, IN, August 13-17, 2000.
Abstract: A new national monitoring network for the measurement of fine particular matter (PM2.5) is currently under development. A primary goal of this network is to collect monitoring data in residential communities for the evaluation of compliance with particulate air quality standards, In this analysis, we apply an empirical Bayesian approach io predict PM2.5 at selected points within multi-state regions covering the eastern U.S.

PRESENTATION A Bayesian Approach to Spatial Prediction Using the Matern Covariance Function 08/13/2000
Holland, D M. AND M. Fuentes. A Bayesian Approach to Spatial Prediction Using the Matern Covariance Function. Presented at American Statistical Association Joint Statistical Meetings 2000 Special Topic Session - Spatial Prediction of Environmental Processes, Indianapolis, IN, August 13-17, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Wetland Change Detection in An Urban Area: Implications for Ecosystem Assessment Techniques in Rapidly Developing Landscapes 08/12/2000
Lopez, R D. AND C. B. Davis. Wetland Change Detection in An Urban Area: Implications for Ecosystem Assessment Techniques in Rapidly Developing Landscapes. Presented at Society of Wetland Scientists - International Association of Ecology, Quebec City, Canada, August 6-12, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Impacts of Soil Salization in a Lower Colorado River Impoundment Riparian Wetlands 08/06/2000
TallentHalsell, N G. AND C L. Cross. Impacts of Soil Salization in a Lower Colorado River Impoundment Riparian Wetlands. Presented at Annual Conference of the Society of Wetland Scientist, Quebec, Canada, August 6-12, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Analyzing the Consequences of Environmental Spatial Patterns on Environmental Resources: the Use of Landscape Metrics Generated from Remote Sensing Data 08/06/2000
Jones, K B., A C. Neale, M S. Nash, R. D. van Remortel, J D. Wickham, K. H. Riitters, AND R. V. O'Neill. Analyzing the Consequences of Environmental Spatial Patterns on Environmental Resources: the Use of Landscape Metrics Generated from Remote Sensing Data. Presented at Geological Congress, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 6-17, 2000.
Abstract: A number of existing and new remote sensing data provide images of areas ranging from small communities to continents. These images provide views on a wide range of physical features in the landscape, including vegetation, road infrastructure, urban areas, geology, soils, and water courses. Despite increases in the spatial and attribute resolution of images over the last few years, we have fallen behind on our ability to move these images beyond pretty pictures to robust environmental assessments. This paper presents a series of methods developed by the US Environmental -Protection Agency to analyze spatial patterns in the environment and the consequences of such patterns on the conditions of ecological resources, including forests, water, and biota (biological diversity). The methods apply fundamental principles from the fields of landscape ecology and ecological hierarchy theory, and take advantage of new remote sensing databases and advances in geographic information system (GIS) technology. We demonstrate the applications of these approaches relative to three scales: (1) an assessment of forest fragmentation at the global scale, (2) an assessment of water resources at a regional scale, and (3) an assessment of habitat resources (biological diversity) at a watershed or catchment scale.

PRESENTATION Determining the Mineralogy of Poorly Crystaline Mine Drainage Precipitates Using Hyperspectral Data 07/24/2000
Williams, D J. Determining the Mineralogy of Poorly Crystaline Mine Drainage Precipitates Using Hyperspectral Data. Presented at IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Honolulu, HI, July 24-28, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION An Assessment of Ground Truth Variability Using a "VIRTUAL Vield Reference Database" 07/12/2000
Lunetta, R S., J. Iiames, J Knight, R. O. Congalton, AND T H. Mace. An Assessment of Ground Truth Variability Using a "VIRTUAL Vield Reference Database". Presented at International Symposium on Spatial Accuracy Assessment in Natural Resources - Accuracy 2000, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, July 12-26, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Correction for the Impacts of Covariance Between Concentration and Deposition Velocity or Castnet Hno, Deposition Estimates 07/03/2000
Sickles II, J E. AND D. S. Shadwick. Correction for the Impacts of Covariance Between Concentration and Deposition Velocity or Castnet Hno, Deposition Estimates. Presented at Sixth International Conference on Air Surface Exchange of Gases and Particles, Edinburgh, Scotland, July 3-7, 2000.
Abstract: The covariance between hourly concentration (C) and deposition velocity (V) for various atmospheric; species may act to bias the, deposition (D) computed from the product of the weekly average C and 'V. This is a potential problem for the CASTNet filter pack (FP) species, nitric acid (H.NO3'. Using ozone (03) behavior as a surrogate for the FP species, correction factors (CF) are developed to estimate this bias. Weekly CF for 03 depend on both site and season, and seasonal average weekly, C.F for 03 at a given site may be as high as 1.25. The seasonal magnitude of these CF is generally largest in summer and is ordered> summer > fall > spring > winter. The CF is driven to a large extent by the diurnal correlation between C and V (i.e., both are generally higher during the day and lower at night). However, since the diurnal C profile at elevated sites is relatively constant, the resulting correlation between C and V is small, and the CF at montane sites is generally negligible. The sampling protocol using daytime integrated sampling for a week and nighttime integrated sampling for a week captures the diurnal correlation between C and V adequately may be used to aggregate relatively unbiased weekly D estimates. Day-night CF for 03 are close to unity, and limited results suggest similar behavior for HN03. Using these limited FP results, the site- and seasonally-.specific weekly CF for 03 are refined to estimate the corresponding CF for HN03. Worst-case adjustments for IIN03 as high as 30% are indicated for summer periods at a given site,

PRESENTATION Air Quality, Deposition Velocity, and Dry Deposition in the Eastern United States 07/03/2000
Sickles II, J E. Air Quality, Deposition Velocity, and Dry Deposition in the Eastern United States. Presented at Sixth International Conference on Air-Surface Exchange of Gases and Particles, Edinburgh, Scotland, July 3-7, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION GIS: QA Concerns 06/26/2000
Brilis, G M. GIS: QA Concerns. Presented at Midwest Environmental Enforcement Association 51st Periodic Membershiup training Conference, Itasca, IL, June 26-29, 2000.
Abstract: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are increasingly becoming an important tool in making Agency decisions. Quality Control and Quality Assurance is required to be integrated the planning, implementation and assessment of GIS databases. The presentations in this session will address some of efforts being by various programs and offices to improve the quality of GIS outputs and will also examine how the quality of GIS affects enforcement of environmental regulations.

PRESENTATION Transforming Nexrad Precipitation Files for GIS Use in Data Assessment 06/26/2000
Pitchford, A M., A. H. Rager, AND R. D. van Remortel. Transforming Nexrad Precipitation Files for GIS Use in Data Assessment. Presented at ESRI Conference, San Diego, CA, June 26-29, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Geographic Information Systems in Environmental Enforcement 06/26/2000
Brilis, G M. Geographic Information Systems in Environmental Enforcement. Presented at Midwest Environmental Enforcement Association 51st Periodic Membership Training Conference, Itasca, IL, June 26-29, 2000.
Abstract: GIS has become a common tool in environmental management and enforcement. Only in the last few years, however, has the technology come into use directly by litigators working on environmental cases. This presentation explores how GIS is being used in law firms to manage and support cases. In general, there is a progression in the sophistication of use. This ranges from building courtroom exhibits from pre-packaged data sets, to integrating and analyzing data sets of disparate origin, and finally to full-scale information-management. These applications require attorneys, paralegals and technical experts to be aware of data quality issues at different levels

PRESENTATION Behaviorial Ecology of the Eastern Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon P. Piscivorus) in a Natural and An Anthropogenic Marsh Habitat in Southeastern Virginia 06/14/2000
Cross, C L. Behaviorial Ecology of the Eastern Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon P. Piscivorus) in a Natural and An Anthropogenic Marsh Habitat in Southeastern Virginia. Presented at 80th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, La Paz, B.C.S., Mexico, June 14, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Mass Determination of Intact a-Chain Hemoglobin Adducts to Within 0.2 Using Mass Peak Profiling from Selected Ion Recording Data (Mppsird) With Electrospray Ionization 06/11/2000
Zhao, X, A H. Grange, AND G W. Sovocool. Mass Determination of Intact a-Chain Hemoglobin Adducts to Within 0.2 Using Mass Peak Profiling from Selected Ion Recording Data (Mppsird) With Electrospray Ionization. Presented at 48th Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics, ASMS Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA, June 11-16, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Determination of Elemental Compositions of Ions from Trace Levels of Pharmaceuticals and Disinfection Byproducts in Water Supplies Using Mass Peak Profiling from Selected Ion Recording Data (Mppsird) 06/11/2000
Grange, A H. AND G W. Sovocool. Determination of Elemental Compositions of Ions from Trace Levels of Pharmaceuticals and Disinfection Byproducts in Water Supplies Using Mass Peak Profiling from Selected Ion Recording Data (Mppsird). Presented at American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 48th Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA, June 11-15, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Ion Composition Elucidation (Ice) of Ions from Trace Levels of Pharmaceuticals and Disinfection Byproducts in Water Supplies 06/11/2000
Grange, A H. AND G W. Sovocool. Ion Composition Elucidation (Ice) of Ions from Trace Levels of Pharmaceuticals and Disinfection Byproducts in Water Supplies. Presented at 48th Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics (ASMS) Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA, June 11-15, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Mass Determination of Intact a-Chain Hemoglobin Adducts to Within 0.2 Da Using Mass Peak Profiling Rom Selected Ion Recording Data (Mppsird) With Electrospray Ionization 06/11/2000
Zhao, X, A H. Grange, AND G W. Sovocool. Mass Determination of Intact a-Chain Hemoglobin Adducts to Within 0.2 Da Using Mass Peak Profiling Rom Selected Ion Recording Data (Mppsird) With Electrospray Ionization. Presented at 48th Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics, ASMS Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA, June 11-15, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Determination of the Mass of Intact Chain Hemoglobin Adducts to Within 0.2 Da Using Mass Peak Profiling from Selected Ion Recording Data (Mppsird) With Electrospray Ionization 06/11/2000
Zhao, X, A H. Grange, AND G W. Sovocool. Determination of the Mass of Intact Chain Hemoglobin Adducts to Within 0.2 Da Using Mass Peak Profiling from Selected Ion Recording Data (Mppsird) With Electrospray Ionization. Presented at American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 48th Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, June 11-15, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Overarching Issues and Concerns 06/07/2000
Daughton, C G. Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Overarching Issues and Concerns. Presented at National Ground Water Association Emerging Issues Conference Pharmaceuticals Session, Minneapolis, MN, June 6-8, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Development and Application of a Solid Phase Extraction and Micro-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Method for Detecting Three Pharamaceuticals in Natural Waters 06/07/2000
JonesLepp, T, K E. Varner, AND A. Mitchell. Development and Application of a Solid Phase Extraction and Micro-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Method for Detecting Three Pharamaceuticals in Natural Waters. Presented at National Ground Water Association Emerging Issues Conference, Minneapolis, MN, June 7-8, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Impervious Surfaces and Steamflow Discharge: A Historical Remote Sensing Perspective in a Northern Virginia Sub-Watershed 05/31/2000
Jennings, D B. AND S T. Jarnagin. Impervious Surfaces and Steamflow Discharge: A Historical Remote Sensing Perspective in a Northern Virginia Sub-Watershed. Presented at American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPERS) 2000, Washington, DC, May 31, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Correlation of Landscape Characteristics With Non-Point Source Water Pollution 05/24/2000
Smith, J H., T G. Wade, J D. Wickham, AND K B. Jones. Correlation of Landscape Characteristics With Non-Point Source Water Pollution. Presented at American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Washington, DC, May 24, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Spectral Remote Sensing of Contaminated Mine Drainage 05/22/2000
Slonecker, E T. AND D J. Williams. Spectral Remote Sensing of Contaminated Mine Drainage. Presented at American Society for Photogrametry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) Annual Convention - DC 2000, Washington, DC, May 22-26, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Determining Impervious Surfaces in Satellite Imagery Using Digital Orthophotography 05/20/2000
Williams, D J. AND S B. Norton. Determining Impervious Surfaces in Satellite Imagery Using Digital Orthophotography. Presented at American Society for Photogrammetry & Remote Sensing Annual Convention, Washington, DC, May 20, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Remote Sensing of Perchlorate Effects on Salt Cedar Preliminary Results from the Las Vegas Wash 04/23/2000
Mace, T H., J J. Ellington, J J. Evans, S. C. McCutheon, J. T. Mace, E T. Slonecker, D J. Williams, H. Lang, AND J. Van den Bosch. Remote Sensing of Perchlorate Effects on Salt Cedar Preliminary Results from the Las Vegas Wash. Presented at 2001 American Society for Photogrametry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) Annual Conference, St. Louis, MO, April 23-27, 2001.
Abstract:
Sodium Perchlorate and ammonium Perchlorate, major components of solid rocket fuel, have been manufactured in the Las Vegas Valley immediately up gradient from the Las Vegas Wash, since 1945 and 1956, respectively. Measurements of emerging ground water quality in the vicinity of the Wash have Perchlorate concentrations up to I 00,000 ppb, and surface water in the Wash has concentrations of approximately 400 ppb. The potential discharge of Perchlorate into Lake Mead and the lower Colorado River system is an environmental concern. This study examines the feasibility of mapping Perchlorate effects in Salt Cedar (Tamarix ramosissima), an invasive tree species in riparian zones throughout the southwest, as an indicator of Perchlorate contamination. Our working hypothesis is that Salt Cedar accumulates Perchlorate from contaminated soils and shallow groundwater resulting in measurable physiological changes. Preliminary results using NASA MODIS/ASTER Simulator (MASTER) low altitude aircraft data acquired in October of 1999, low altitude AVIRIS aircraft data acquired in July of 2000, chemical analysis of soil, water, and fohar samples, and field and laboratory spectrometry are presented. These preliminary results are all consistent and indicate that Salt Cedar leaves and branches contain Perchlorate in the vicinity of shallow contaminated groundwater and soils, and that the spectral characteristics of severely affected trees differ from unaffected trees. This difference is particularly evident in a composite of Principal Components Transformation Bands 4, 5, and 6 from the 50-band MASTER overflight data which shows a unique spectral response in the vicinity of the documented Perchlorate plume.


PRESENTATION Application of a "VITURAL Field Reference Database" to Assess Land-Cover Map Accuracies 04/23/2000
Iiames, J., D Pilant, AND R S. Lunetta. Application of a "VITURAL Field Reference Database" to Assess Land-Cover Map Accuracies. Presented at American Society for Photogrametry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) 2001 Annual Conference, St. Louis, MO, April 23-27, 2000.
Abstract: An accuracy assessment was performed for the Neuse River Basin, NC land-cover/use (LCLU) mapping results using a "Virtual Field Reference Database (VFRDB)". The VFRDB was developed using field measurement and digital imagery (camera) data collected at 1,409 sites over a period of two years (1998-99) and was designed to support detailed assessments of remote sensor derived LCLU products by providing a robust database characterizing representative cover types throughout the study area. To account for plot Heterogeneity two independent interpreters assigned class labels to the VFRDB reference data set corresponding to a hierarchical classification system. Interpretations were based on the detailed field measurement and imagery (camera) data contained in the VFRDB. Correspondence between interpreters was analyzed at multiple classification levels. A high level of correspondence between interpreters was attributed to the high quality source of measurement and imagery data to guide class assignments. Disagreements, between interpreters were a result of landscape heterogeneity. Results demonstrate the importance of a reference that can be repetitively interpreted to provide reference data with known variability, to support the quantitative assessments of remote sensor derived LCLU products

PRESENTATION Predicting Changes Using Multi-Date Satellite Imagery: San Pedro River Case Study 04/23/2000
Kepner, W G., C. J. Watts, C Edmonds, J. K. Maingi, AND S. E. Marsh. Predicting Changes Using Multi-Date Satellite Imagery: San Pedro River Case Study. Presented at Predicting Hydrologic, Geologic, and Biologic Responses to a Drier and Warmer Climate in the Desert Southwest, Tucson, AZ, April 23-25, 2001.
Abstract: . Vegetation change in the American West has been a subject of concern throughout the twentieth century. Although many of the changes have been recorded qualitatively through the use of comparative photography and historical reports, little quantitative information has been available on the regional or watershed scale. Additionally, little research effort has been dedicated to improving human understanding regarding changing conditions and trend relative to planning and management of common resources at regional landscape scales. During the past two decades, important advances in the integration of remote imagery, computer processing, and spatial analysis technologies have been used to better understand the distribution of natural communities and ecosystems, and the ecological processes that affect these patterns. These technologies provide the basis for developing landscape measurements that can be integrated within hydrologic and nonequilibrium models to determine long-term change and make predictive inferences about the future.

This case study employs a system land cover maps generated from a multi-date satellite imagery database which incorporates Landsat Multi-Spectral Scanner (MSS) imagery from the early 1970s'mid 1980s, and early 1990s and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery from 1997. It has been tested over the Upper San Pedro Watershed (U.S./Mexico) where results indicate that extensive, highly connected grassland and desertscrub areas are the most vulnerable ecosystems to fragmentation and actual loss due to encroachment of xerophytic mesquite woodland and urbanization. In the study period, grasslands and desertscrub not only decreased in extent but also became more fragmented. That is, the number of grassland and desertscrub patches increased and their average patch sizes decreased. In stark contrast, the mesquite woodland patches increased in size, number, and connectivity. These changes have important impact for the hydrology of the region, since the energy and water balance characteristics for these cover types are significantly different. This study has been used to determine ecosystem vulnerabilities through the use of change detection and indicator development, especially in regard to traditional degradation processes that have occurred throughout the western rangelands involving changes of vegetative cover and acceleration of water and wind erosion.

PRESENTATION Retrospective Landscape Analysis, An Approach for Evaluation Land Cover Change: San Pedro River Case Study 04/18/2000
Kepner, W G., C. J. Watts, C M. Edmonds, J. K. Maingi, AND S. E. Marsh. Retrospective Landscape Analysis, An Approach for Evaluation Land Cover Change: San Pedro River Case Study. Presented at 43rd Annual conference of the Western Social Sciences Association (Association of Borderland Studies), Reno, NV, April 18-22, 2001.
Abstract: Vegetation change in the American West has been the subject of much concern and controversy throughout the twentieth century. Over the years, a considerable number and variety of 'claims have been made regarding cause related to changes in land cover. The evidence for vegetation change has primarily been provided through the use of comparative photography and anecdotal accounts. Rarely, have changes been documented or quantitatively measured at scales as large as watersheds or entire biogeographic provinces. This research examines the potential to measure vegetation change over large areas and determine trends in ecological condition using advanced space-based technologies. Specifically, a suite of landscape pattern measurements were developed from satellite remote sensing, spatial statistics, and geographic information systems technology for a semi-arid watershed in southeast Arizona and northeast Sonora, Mexico. Results from this study will provide the basis for developing landscape composition and pattern indicators as sensitive measures of large-scale environmental change and thus, will further the understanding of disturbance regimes related to human and natural stress in the Southwest.


PRESENTATION Landscape Indicators and Assessment 04/15/2000
O'Neill, R. V., E R. Smith, K. H. Ritters, J D. Wickham, K B. Jones, AND N. L. Tran. Landscape Indicators and Assessment. Presented at The 15th Annual Symposium, U.S. Chapter of the International Association for Landscape Ecology, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, April 15-19, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION National Land-Cover Data 04/15/2000
Smith, J H., J D. Wickham, L. Yang, AND N. Van Driel. National Land-Cover Data. Presented at The 15th Annual Symposium, U.S. Division of the International Association of Landscape Ecology, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, April 15-19, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Relationship Between Landscape Fragmentation, Structural Plant Guilds, and Avian Dispersal in Wetland Ecosytems 04/15/2000
Lopez, R D. AND C. B. Davis. Relationship Between Landscape Fragmentation, Structural Plant Guilds, and Avian Dispersal in Wetland Ecosytems. Presented at International Association of Landscape Ecology, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, April 15-19, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Spatial Pattern of Future Vulnerability of Stream Eutrophication in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States 04/15/2000
Wickham, J D., E R. Smith, R. V. O'Neill, K. H. Ritters, T G. Wade, AND K B. Jones. Spatial Pattern of Future Vulnerability of Stream Eutrophication in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States. Presented at 15th Annual Symposium, U.S. Division of the International Association of Landscape Ecology, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, April 15-19, 2000.
Abstract: Spatially explicit identification of changes in ecological conditions over large areas is key to targeting and prioritizing areas for environmental protection and restoration by managers at watershed, basin, and regional scales. A critical limitation to this point has been the development of methods to conduct such broad-scale assessments. Field-based methods have proven to be too costly and too inconsistent in their application to make estimates of ecological conditions over large areas. New spatial data derived from satellite imagery and other sources, the development of statistical models relating landscape composition and pattern to ecological endpoints, and geographic information systems (GIS) make it possible to evaluate ecological conditions at multiple scales over broad geographic regions. In this study, we demonstrate the application of spatially distributed models for bird habitat quality and nitrogen yield to streams to assess the consequences of landcover change across the mid-Atlantic region between the 1970s and 1990s. Moreover, we present a way to evaluate spatial concordance between models related to different environmental end-points. Results of this study should help environmental managers in the mid-Atlantic region target those areas in need of conservation and protection.

PRESENTATION Integrating Human, Physical, and Biological Data for Landscape Assessments 04/10/2000
Smith, E R., K. H. Ritters, AND J D. Wickham. Integrating Human, Physical, and Biological Data for Landscape Assessments. Presented at The 15th Annual Symposium, U.S. Chapter of the International Association for Landscape Ecology, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, April 10-19, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION The Importance of Spatial Accuracy for Environmental Analyses 04/06/2000
Brilis, G M. The Importance of Spatial Accuracy for Environmental Analyses. Presented at 19th Annual National Conference on Managing Quality Systems for Environmental Programs, Albuquerque, NM, April 6, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION QA Evaluation of Records Management 04/05/2000
Brilis, G M. QA Evaluation of Records Management. Presented at Nineteenth Annual National Conference on Managing Quality Systems for Environmental Programs, Albuquerque, NM, April 5, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION EPA GIS-QA Team 04/03/2000
Brilis, G M. EPA GIS-QA Team. Presented at Nineteenth Annual National Conference on Managing Quality Systems for Environmental Programs, Albuquerque, NM, April 3-6, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Micro-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Two Suspected Endocrine Disruptors Dibutyltin and Triphenyltin in Natural Waters and Fish Tissue 03/31/2000
JonesLepp, T AND K E. Varner. Micro-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Two Suspected Endocrine Disruptors Dibutyltin and Triphenyltin in Natural Waters and Fish Tissue. Presented at ACS Special Symposium "Issues in the Analysis of Environmental Endocrine Disruptors", San Francisco, CA, March 26-31, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Effects of Catastrophic Flooding on Hydric Soils of Eastern North Carolina 03/30/2000
Reuter, R J., C. W. Zanner, AND M. J. Vepraskas. Effects of Catastrophic Flooding on Hydric Soils of Eastern North Carolina. Presented at Annual North Carolina Water Resources Research Conference, Raleigh, NC, March 30, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Development and Application of a Micdro-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Metnod for the Detection of Two Suspected Endocrine Disruptors: Dibutyltin and Triphenyltin, in Natural Waters and Fish Tissue 03/26/2000
Varner, K E., T L. Jones, AND C. Eskes. Development and Application of a Micdro-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Metnod for the Detection of Two Suspected Endocrine Disruptors: Dibutyltin and Triphenyltin, in Natural Waters and Fish Tissue. Presented at ACS National Meeting, San Francisco, CA, March 26-31, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Pharmaceuticals in the Environment Overarching Issues and Concerns 03/26/2000
Daughton, C G. Pharmaceuticals in the Environment Overarching Issues and Concerns. Presented at ACS National Meeting: Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment, San Francisco, CA, March 26-31, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Micro-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Dibutyltin-in Natural Waters 03/26/2000
JonesLepp, T AND K E. Varner. Micro-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Dibutyltin-in Natural Waters. Presented at ACS Special Symposium "Issues in the Analysis of Environmental Disruptors", San Francisco, CA, March 26-31, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION A New High Resolution Mass Spectromey Technique for Identifying Pharmaceuticals and Potential Endocrine Disruptors in Drinking Water Sources 03/25/2000
Grange, A H. A New High Resolution Mass Spectromey Technique for Identifying Pharmaceuticals and Potential Endocrine Disruptors in Drinking Water Sources. Presented at ACS National Meeting, San Francisco, CA, March 25-29, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Quality Science in the Courtroom 03/20/2000
Brilis, G M., A. D. Wait, AND J. Worthington. Quality Science in the Courtroom. Presented at The 10th Annual West Coast Conference on Contaminated Soils and Water, San Diego, CA, March 20-23, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Interactions Between Bythotrephes Cederstroemi and Leptodora Kindtii Inferred from Seasonal Population Abundance Patterns in Lake Michigamme, Michigan, USA 02/12/2000
Jarnagin, S T. AND B. K. Swan. Interactions Between Bythotrephes Cederstroemi and Leptodora Kindtii Inferred from Seasonal Population Abundance Patterns in Lake Michigamme, Michigan, USA. Presented at American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) 2001 Aquatic Sciences meeting, Albuquerque, NM, February 12-16, 2001.
Abstract: Bythotrephes cederstroemi is a non-indigenous predaceous zooplankter invading North American freshwater lakes in the Great Lakes region. We present seasonal population abundance values for both Bythotrephes and Leptodora kindtii from Lake Michigamme, Michigan for the years 1995-1997. We illustrate that Leptodora appears to be inhibited by Bythotrephes. Leptodora populations declined to near zero when Bythotrephes mean whole-depth abundance exceeded 3-5 animals per m3 and late season Leptodora populations consisted only of nauplii.

Our population data do not demonstrate the reason for the apparent inhibition of Leptodora by Bythotrephes. Bythotrephes may out-compete Leptodora for a shared food resource or may directly prey upon Leptodora. Our data emphasize the potential for the alteration of food webs due to the introduction of Bythotrephes into freshwater lake ecosystems. Both species rely on resting eggs to overwinter and reestablish populations. The elimination of early season Leptodora adult and juvenile instars and the failure of late season Leptodora nauplii to reach adulthood and produce resting eggs could result in the elimination of Leptodora from lakes where Bythotrephes has invaded.


PRESENTATION Spatial Pattern of Water Pollution Risk in Maryland, USA 01/31/2000
Wickham, J D. AND T G. Wade. Spatial Pattern of Water Pollution Risk in Maryland, USA. Presented at 2nd International Conference on Geospatial Data in Forestry and Agriculture, Lake Buena Vista, FL, January 31, 2000.
Abstract: Numerous field studies show that nitrogen (and phosphorous)export coefficients are significantly different acroos forest, agriculture, and urban land-cover types. We treated these export coefficients as a distribution, and used simulations to estimate the risk of increased nitrogen loads for Maryland watersheds as a function of land-cover composition. Highest risks were found in the north-central portion of the state, and the highest variability of risk estimates occurred along the Baltimore-Washington corridor. The methods apply to environmental management for assessing the risk to increased nonpoint nutrient pollution. Interpretation of the risk measures are discussed relative to their application for a single watershed and across a region comprised of several watersheds.

PRESENTATION The Importance of Spatial Accuracy for Onsite Analysis 01/26/2000
Brilis, G M. The Importance of Spatial Accuracy for Onsite Analysis. Presented at Eighth International Conference - On site Analysis, Lake Las Vegas, NV, January 26, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Quality Assurance Evaluation of Onsite Computer Systems 01/23/2000
Brilis, G M. Quality Assurance Evaluation of Onsite Computer Systems. Presented at The Eighth International Conference of Onsite Analysis, Field Analytical Chemistry...the Lab Comes to the Field, Lake Las Vegas, NV, January 23-26, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION The Importance of Spatial Accuracy for Onsite Analyses 01/23/2000
Brilis, G M. The Importance of Spatial Accuracy for Onsite Analyses. Presented at The Eighth International Conference of Onsite Analysis, Field Analytical Chemistry...the Lab Comes to the Field, Lake Las Vegas, NV, January 23-26, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Ants as Biological Indicators for Monitoring Changes in Arid Environments: Lessons for Monitoring Protected Areas 01/23/2000
Nash, M S. AND W G. Whitford. Ants as Biological Indicators for Monitoring Changes in Arid Environments: Lessons for Monitoring Protected Areas. Presented at 1st International Symposium and Workshop on Arid Zone Environments: Research and Management Options for Protected Areas, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE), January 23, 2000.
Abstract: The responses of ant communities to structural change (removal of an invasive were studied in a replicated experiment in a Chihuahuan Desert grassland. The
results from sampling of ant communities by pit-fall trapping were validated by
mapping ant colonies on the experimental plots. Spatial and temporal responses of
a dominant species were examined by kriging maps and analysis of variance. The
'IL,Merical and spatial responses of ants recorded from pit-fall trap data were the
same as those recorded from mapping ant nests. The dominant liquid feeding species
Change and environmental stress. The co-dominant seed-harvesting ant, Pogonomyrmex desertorum Wheeler abundance, exhibited a numerical response to ecosystem change but the nests did not change their spatial distribution. Species richness was also affected by ecosystem change.


PRESENTATION Factors Affecting Establishment of Creosotebush in Desert Grasslands and the Effects of Establishment on Ecosystem Properties 01/20/2000
Whitford, W G. Factors Affecting Establishment of Creosotebush in Desert Grasslands and the Effects of Establishment on Ecosystem Properties. Presented at 2000 New Mexico Society for Range Management Meeting, Albuquerque, NM, January 20-21, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION National Parks Samples: Multi-Element By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry 01/10/2000
Momplaisir, G M., C G. Rosal, AND E M. Heithmar. National Parks Samples: Multi-Element By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Presented at 2000 Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, January 10-15, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Measurement of Mercury in Solid Environmental Samples By Icpms With on-Line Sample Ashing and Hg Concentration Using An Automatic Mercury Analyzer (Tm) 01/10/2000
Heithmar, E M. AND J V. Cizdziel. Measurement of Mercury in Solid Environmental Samples By Icpms With on-Line Sample Ashing and Hg Concentration Using An Automatic Mercury Analyzer (Tm). Presented at Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, January 10-15, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PRESENTATION Performance of the High-Efficiency Nebulizer (Hen) at Reduced Flow Rates in An Icpms System 01/10/2000
Heithmar, E M., C G. Rosal, G M. Momplaisir, AND J V. Cizdziel. Performance of the High-Efficiency Nebulizer (Hen) at Reduced Flow Rates in An Icpms System. Presented at Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, January 10-15, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PUBLISHED REPORT An Accuracy Assessment of 1997 Landsat Thematic Mapper Derived Land Cover for the Upper San Pedro Watershed (U.S./Mexico) 12/21/2000
Skirvin, S. M., S. E. Drake, J. K. Maingi, S. E. Marsh, AND W G. Kepner. An Accuracy Assessment of 1997 Landsat Thematic Mapper Derived Land Cover for the Upper San Pedro Watershed (U.S./Mexico). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/097 (NTIS PB2001-104914), 2000.
Abstract: High-Resolution airborne color video data were used to evaluate the accuracy of a land cover map of the upper San Pedro River watershed, derived from June 1997 Landsat Thematic Mapper data. The land cover map was interpreted and generated by Instituto del Medio Ambiente y el Besarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Sonora (IMADES), Hermosillo, Sonora and supplies to the Arizona Remote Sensing Center at the University of Arizona for evaluation. Map pixel size had been increased from 30 to 60 meters to match the 1973, 1986, and 1992 North American Landscape Characterization (NALC) land cover maps produced from Landsat MSS data.
The airborne color video data included six flight lines acquired 2-5 May 1997 over the San Pedro watershed in the U.S. GPS time and coordinate information encoded on the video tapes were used to generate GIS point coverages of video frames covering the upper San Pedro. A total of 527 video sample points were drawn randomly from a subset of 4567 frames falling on areas of uniform cover classes at least 180 meters square. Sample points were stratified by cover class area, with a minimum sample of 24 points of classes of small areal extent. The Water class was extremely rare (covering less than 0.1% of the study area) and was excluded from video data analysis for lack of data. Video sample points were reviewed by an experienced interpreter who assigned land cover class labels based on available descriptions. Map and video labels were compared to generate a classification error matrix, which produced an overall map accuracy of about 72%.

PUBLISHED REPORT Interim EPA Guidance for Geospatial-Related Quality Assurance Project Plans 12/16/2000
Brilis, G M. AND B. Chem. Interim EPA Guidance for Geospatial-Related Quality Assurance Project Plans. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-01/062 (NTIS PB2002-104613), 2000.
Abstract: This guidance supplements EPA Guidance for Quality,Assurance Project Plans (EPA QA/G-5), in that the focus here is on collection and use of geospatial rather than other environmental data (e.g., strictly chemical or biological data), including unique aspects of data storage, retrieval and processing. This guidance addresses the aspects of the Geospatial Information Lifecyle (Figure 1).
The EPA recognizes that the use of quality management components and tools in the Organization/Program and the Project levels is based on a graded approach where components and tools are applied according to the scope of the program and/or the intended use of the outputs from a process. This approach recognizes that a "one size fits all" approach to quality requirements is not appropriate for an organization as diverse as EPA. For example, the quality expectations of a fundamental research program are different from that of a regulatory compliance program because the purpose or intended use of the data differs. Applying a graded approach means that quality systems tools and components for different organizations and programs will vary according to the specific objectives and needs of the organization.

OVERVIEW OF QA PROJECT PLAN REQUIREMENTS FOR GEOSPATIAL DATA

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Quality Assurance Project Plan as an important tool for project managers and planners to document the type and quality of data needed for environmental decisions and to provide a blueprint for collecting and assessing those data. The QA project plan is the critical planning document for any environmental data collection or use because it documents how quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) activities will be implemented during the life cycle of a project, or task. EPA policy requires that all projects involving the generation, acquisition, and use of environmental data be planned and documented and have an Agency-approved QA project plan prior to the start of data collection. The QA project plan should be detailed enough to provide a clear description of every aspect of the project and include information for every member of the project staff, including data collectors, software users, and data reviewers. Effective implementation of the plan assists project managers in keeping projects on schedule and within the resource budget.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Groundwater Sampling Technologies, Clean Environment Equipment, Samplease Bladder Pump 11/25/2000
Einfeld, W. AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Groundwater Sampling Technologies, Clean Environment Equipment, Samplease Bladder Pump. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/078 (NTIS PB2003-106590), 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting purchase, and use of environmental technologies.
The SamplEase is a bladder pump consisting of an internal flexible Teflon bladder that is positioned within a rigid stainless steel pump body. The ends of the pump are also constructed of Teflon. The inner bladder is equipped with one-way inlet and outlet valves and passively fills with water when the pump is at depth in the well as a result of the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the surrounding water column. Following the fill cycle, compressed air or nitrogen from a cylinder or compressor at the wellhead is driven down to the pump through tubing to compress the bladder, thus driving the sample up to the surface through a second tubing line. The pumping sequence consists of repeated fill-compress cycles, using a pneumatic controller positioned at the wellhead. The controller is used to vary the duration and frequency of the fill-compress cycles in order to deliver the desired sample flow rate at the wellhead. The bladder design offers the advantage of minimizing sample turbulence, which can result in loss of VOCs in the sample, as well as eliminating contact of the water sample with the compressed air or nitrogen used to lift the sample to the surface.

PUBLISHED REPORT Testing Landscape Indicators for Stream Condition Related to Pesticides and Nutrients: Landscape Indicators for Pesticides Study for Mid-Atlantic Coastal Streams (Lips-Macs) 11/03/2000
Pitchford, A M., J. M. Denver, A R. Olsen, S. W. Ator, S M. Cormier, M S. Nash, AND M H. Mehaffey. Testing Landscape Indicators for Stream Condition Related to Pesticides and Nutrients: Landscape Indicators for Pesticides Study for Mid-Atlantic Coastal Streams (Lips-Macs). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/087 (NTIS PB2003-106612), 2000.
Abstract: This research plan for the Landscape Indicators for Pesticides Study ? Mid-Atlantic Coastal Streams (LIPS-MACS) describes the rational and approach of developing a research project to evaluate statistical landscape indicator models for freshwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. This study is the first in a series of studies which will develop landscape indicator models for pesticides and toxic chemicals in selected areas, nationwide. These models, often termed "landscape indicators," will be developed for pesticides and nutrients in stream water and persistent organic pollutants, mercury, and arsenic in sediments. In the statistical analysis, certain landscape characteristics, termed metrics, will be compared with dependent variables. The chemical analyses will include pesticides, nutrients, and major ions in stream water and historically used chlorinated pesticides, poly chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury and arsenic in stream sediments.
This study in intended to be consistent with several U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approaches and guidelines including the Landscapes Approach (Jones et al., 2000); EPA's Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA 1998), EPA's Evaluation Guidelines for Ecological Indicators (Jackson et al., 1999), and the pesticide regulatory perspective.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Environmental Decision Support Software, C Tech Development Corporation, Environmental Visualization System Pro (Evs-Pro) 10/09/2000
Sullivan, T., A. Q. Armstrong, A. B. Dindal, R. A. Jenkins, AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Environmental Decision Support Software, C Tech Development Corporation, Environmental Visualization System Pro (Evs-Pro). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/047 (NTIS PB2003-106586), 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PUBLISHED REPORT National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference: Constitution, Bylaws and Standards; Approved June 2000 09/29/2000
Hankins, J. National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference: Constitution, Bylaws and Standards; Approved June 2000. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/084 (NTIS PB2001-104049), 2000.
Abstract: As Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (NELAP), I offer my sincere appreciation to the many individuals who worked on the 2000 revision of the NELAC standards. I would like to give special recognition to the chairs who facilitated the seemingly endless committee teleconferences during which all comments were considered and debated, as well as to the chairs who were key in addressing the issues of implementing a new program, disseminating information, tracking regulations, and facilitating the operation of the NELAC process: Dr. Marcia Davies, Ms. Barbara Burmeister, Mr. William Ingersoll, Dr. John Griggs, Mr. Joe Slayton, Mr. John Anderson, Mr. Dan Bivins, Dr. Charles Brokopp, Ms. Carol Batterton, Mr. Matthew Caruso, Dr. Irene Ronning, Dr. Michael Miller, and Dr. Kenneth Jackson. NELAP also thanks Past Chair Dr. James Pearson and his staff at the Virginia Department of Consolidated Laboratory Services for hosting the 61h NELAC Annual Meeting.

In addition, it is my pleasure to recognize the extensive efforts made in implementing the NELAC standards by the NELAP Accrediting Authorities: the California Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program, the Florida Department of Health, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, the New Hampshire Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, the New York State Department of Health, the Oregon Health Division, the Pennsylvania Bureau of Laboratories, and the Utah Department of Health.

We are all looking forward to the announcement of the NELAC accredited laboratories scheduled for January 2001. We have reached this point only through the efforts of everyone who has contributed to the overall process, whether by serving on a NELAC committee or Board of Directors, providing comments to the standards, implementing the standards, or seeking NELAC accreditation. I applaud each of you and ask you to continue the hard work that has created a program of which we can all be proud.

Jeanne Hankins NELAP Director


PUBLISHED REPORT Integrity of Voa-Vial Seals 09/15/2000
Schumacher, B A., M. M. Minnich, J. H. Zimmerman, AND J. Blasdell. Integrity of Voa-Vial Seals. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/066 (NTIS PB2001-101547), 2000.
Abstract: Preservation of soil samples for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) requires both the inhibition of VOC degradation and the restriction of vapor movement in or out of the sample container. Clear, 40,mL glass VOA vials manufactured by the four major U.S. glass manufacturers were tested for seal integrity. Visual inspection revealed a variety of imperfections ranging from small indentations, bumps, and scratches on vial threads or lips, through obvious defects, such as large indentations or grooves in the vial lips and chipped or broken glass. The aluminum plate vacuum test proved to be unreliable in identifying potentially leaky vials. The septa-seal vacuum test was conducted twice on the 80 selected vials.
Mean VOC concentrations after 14 days storage generally were within +- 20% of the known concentration with a majority of the concentrations within +- 15% of their known values. There were no statistically significant differences in VOC concentrations between vials in the potentially leaky and control group for any of the manufacturers. Only 1 vial lost VOCs and that was due to a large chip in the vial's lip and neck. These findings indicate that the silicone septa are flexible enough to overcome most vial imperfections and form a complete seal against VOC loss. A careful inspection of the VOA vials prior to use to remove any vials with large and obvious imperfections should be sufficient to screen out vials that are subject to VOC losses.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Groundwater Sampling Technologies, Burge Environmental Inc. Multiprobe 100 09/14/2000
Einfeld, W. AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Groundwater Sampling Technologies, Burge Environmental Inc. Multiprobe 100. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/074 (NTIS PB2003-106589), 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting purchase, and use of environmental technologies.
The Multiprobe 100 consists of two units with tubing and wiring interconnections. A upper receiving module which is deployed at the wellhead on top of the well is 18 inches long. 3.25 inches in diameter, and weighs 3 pounds. The lower sampling module, which is inserted into the water column inside the well, is 12 inches long, 3.25 inches in diameter and also weighs 3 pounds. The system is constructed of Teflon, borosilicate glass, stainless steel and Delrin, a solvent-resistant, acetal homopolymer resin. Electrical solenoid valves are used to select the sampling lever and control gas flow to the sampler. Water level sensors in the water chambers of both modules are used to trigger valve changes during the sampling process. A small, battery-operated microprocessor controller is used to control the valves used during the sampling process.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report Groundwater Sampling Technologies Qed Environmental Systems Inc. Well Wizard Dedicated Sampling System 08/29/2000
Einfeld, W. AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report Groundwater Sampling Technologies Qed Environmental Systems Inc. Well Wizard Dedicated Sampling System. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/062 (NTIS PB2003-106588), 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting purchase, and use of environmental technologies. The Well Wizard is a bladder pump consisting of an internal flexible bladder that is positioned with a rigid stainless steel pump body. The inner bladder is equipped with one-way inlet and outlet valves and passively fills with water when the pump is a depth in the well as a result of the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the surrounding water column. Following the fill cycle, compressed air or nitrogen from a cylinder or compressor at the wellhead is driven down to the sample up to the surface through a second tubing , using a pneumatic controller positioned at the of the fill-compress cycles in order to deliver the the advantage of minimizing sample turbulence, as eliminating contact of the water sample with the surface.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Groundwater Sampling Technologies, Geolog, Inc., Micro-Flo Bladder Pump Model 57400 08/25/2000
Einfeld, W. AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Groundwater Sampling Technologies, Geolog, Inc., Micro-Flo Bladder Pump Model 57400. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/075 (NTIS PB2003-106821), 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies.
The Micro-Flo bladder pump consists of an internal flexible bladder that is positioned within a rigid stainless steel pump body. The inner bladder is equipped with one-way inlet and outlet valves and passively fills with water when the pump is a depth in the well as a result of the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the surrounding water column. Following the fill cycle, compressed air or nitrogen from a cylinder or compressor at the wellhead is driven down to the pump through tubing to compress the bladder, thus driving the water sample up to the surface through a second tubing line. The pumping sequence consists of repeated fill-compress cycles, using a pneumatic controller positioned at the wellhead. The controller is used to vary the duration and frequency of the fill-compress cycles in order to deliver the desired sample flow rate at the wellhead. The bladder design offers the advantage of minimizing sample turbulence, which can result in loss of VOC in the sample, as well as eliminating contact of the water sample with the compressed air or nitrogen used to lift the sample to the surface.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report Envirogard PCB Test Kit Strategic Diagnostics Inc 08/24/2000
Dindal, A. B., C. K. Bayne, AND R. A. Jenkins. Environmental Technology Verification Report Envirogard PCB Test Kit Strategic Diagnostics Inc. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-98/113 (NTIS PB2001-100491), 2000.
Abstract: In July 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a demonstration of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) field analytical techniques. The purpose of this demonstration was to evaluate field analytical technologies capable of detecting and quantifying PCBs in soils and solvent extracts. The fundamental objectives of this demonstration were (1) to obtain technology performance information using environmental and quality control samples. (2) to determine how comparable the developer field analytical results were with conventional reference laboratory results, and (3) to report on the logistical operation of the technology. The demonstration design was subjected to extensive review and comment by EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Environmental Sciences Division in Las Vegas, Nevada; Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); EPA Regional Offices; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); and the technology developers.
The demonstration found that the EnviroGard Kit was simple to operate in the field, requiring about an hour for initial set-up and preparation for sample analysis. Once the kit was operational, the sample throughput of the EnviroGard kit was 18 samples/hour under outdoor conditions and 9 to 10 samples/ hour under chamber conditions. Three operators analyzed samples during the demonstration, but the technology can be run by a single, trained operator. Minimal training (2 to 4 h) is required to operate the EnviroGard kit, provided the user has a fundamental understanding of basic chemical and field analytical techniques. The overall performance of the EnviroGard PCB test kit was characterized as biased and imprecise about 50% of the time; however, the kit generated no false positive or false negative results for soil samples. It should be noted that there was an increased likelihood that results would be biased high as a result of the conservatism that the manufacturer has incorporated into the calculation of results.

PUBLISHED REPORT Land Cover Trends: Rates, Causes, and Consequences of Late Twentieth Century U.S Land Cover Change 08/23/2000
Loveland, T. R., T. Sohl, K. Sayler, A. Gallant, J. Dwyer, J. Vogelmann, G. Zylstra, T Wade, C Edmonds, D J. Chaloud, AND K B. Jones. Land Cover Trends: Rates, Causes, and Consequences of Late Twentieth Century U.S Land Cover Change. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-99/105 (NTIS PB2001-100348), 2000.
Abstract: Information on the rates, driving forces, and consequences of land use and land cover change is important in studies addressing issues ranging from the health of aquatic resources to climate change. This four-year research project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a goal to document the types, geographic distributions, and rates of land cover change on a region-by region basis over the past 30 years for the conterminous U.S., and to determine some of the key drivers and consequences of the changes. The objectives of the study are to: 1)Develop a comprehensive methodology for using sampling and change analysis techniques and Landsat MSS and TM data for measuring regional land cover change across the U.S. 2) Characterize the types, rates, and temporal variability of change for a 30-year period. 3) Document regional driving forces and consequences of change. 4) Prepare a national synthesis of land cover change.
The estimates of conterminous U.S. rates, driving forces, and consequences of land cover change will be developed for 84 ecoregions defined by Omernik of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. These will permit the analysis of the spatial dimension of land cover change, and will also contribute to the assessment of consequences of land cover change. Our goal is to identify greater than or equal to 1% change in general land cover within each ecoregion, at an 85% confidence level. Initially, we will test our ability to achieve this goal in five pilot regions: (1) Montana Valley and Foothill Prairies, (2) North Central Appalachians, (3) Norther Piedmont, (4) Southeastern Plains, and (5) Madrean Archipelago. Based on the results of the pilot test, we will refine and apply an appropriate methodology to the remaining conterminous U.S. ecoregions.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Environmental Decision Support Software, Decision Fx, Inc., Groundwater Fx 07/24/2000
Sullivan, T., A. Q. Armstrong, A. B. Dindal, R. A. Jenkins, AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Environmental Decision Support Software, Decision Fx, Inc., Groundwater Fx. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/037 (NTIS PB2003-10-6582), 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting,purchase, and use of environmental technologies.
The Site Characterization and Monitoring Technologies Pilot (SCMT), one of 12 technology areas under ETV, is administered by EPA'S National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). With the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) program, NERL selected a team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform the verification of environmental decision support software. This verification statement provides a summary of the test results of a demonstration of the University of Tennessee Research Corporation"s (UTRC's) Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) environmental decision support software product.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Environmental Decision Support Software, University of Tennessee Research Corporation, Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (Sada) 07/22/2000
Sullivan, T., A. Q. Armstrong, A. B. Dindal, R. A. Jenkins, AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Environmental Decision Support Software, University of Tennessee Research Corporation, Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (Sada). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/036 (NTIS PB2003-106581), 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting,purchase, and use of environmental technologies.
The Site Characterization and Monitoring Technologies Pilot (SCMT), one of 12 technology areas under ETV, is administered by EPA'S National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). With the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) program, NERL selected a team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform the verification of environmental decision support software. This verification statement provides a summary of the test results of a demonstration of the University of Tennessee Research Corporation"s (UTRC's) Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) environmental decision support software product.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Explosives Detection Technology, Barringer Instruments, Gc-Ionscan 07/19/2000
Dindal, A. B., C. K. Bayne, R. A. Jenkins, AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Explosives Detection Technology, Barringer Instruments, Gc-Ionscan. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/046 (NTIS PB2003-106585), 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Environmental Decision Support Software, Decision Fx, Inc. Sampling Fx 07/18/2000
Sullivan, T., A. Q. Armstrong, A. B. Dindal, R. A. Jenkins, AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Environmental Decision Support Software, Decision Fx, Inc. Sampling Fx. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/038 (NTIS PB2003-106583), 2000.
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting,purchase, and use of environmental technologies.
The Site Characterization and Monitoring Technologies Pilot (SCMT), one of 12 technology areas under ETV, is administered by EPA'S National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). With the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) program, NERL selected a team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform the verification of environmental decision support software. This verification statement provides a summary of the test results of a demonstration of the University of Tennessee Research Corporation's (UTRC's) Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) environmental decision support software product.

PUBLISHED REPORT Implementation Strategy for Production of National Land-Cover Data (Nlcd) from the Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper Satellite 07/13/2000
Vogelmann, J. E. AND J D. Wickham. Implementation Strategy for Production of National Land-Cover Data (Nlcd) from the Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper Satellite. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/051 (NTIS PB2001-101756), 2000.
Abstract: As environmental programs within and outside the federal government continue to move away from point-based studies to larger and larger spatial (not cartographic) scale, the need for land-cover and other geographic data have become ineluctable. The national land-cover mapping project of MRLC marks the first consistently classified conterminous land-0cover data set, effectively replacing USGS' Land Use Data Analysis (LUDA) system derived from high altitude aerial photography acquired in the early 1970's. Because of the continually changing nature of the earth's surface due to anthropogenic activities and other factors, a single point-in-time land-cover product is insufficient for many applications. Production of a second point-in-time land-cover product is proposed as a database.
The proposed database design includes: 1) a second, independently classified land-cover data set derived from Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper data, 2) the land-cover product being produced under the current effort, 3) selected spectral-based change estimates (e.g., temporal NDVI), 4) thirty-meter DEMS, and 5) selected landscape metrics. Development of the database for the conterminous United States will start after evaluation of the prototype

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Groundwater Sampling Technologies, Sibak Industries Ltd. Inc., Kabis Sampler Models I and II 06/22/2000
Einfeld, W. AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Groundwater Sampling Technologies, Sibak Industries Ltd. Inc., Kabis Sampler Models I and II. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/054 (NTIS PB2003-106587), 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PUBLISHED REPORT Environmental Technology Verification Report, Explosives Detection Technology, Research International Inc., Fast 2000 06/18/2000
Dindal, A. B., C. K. Bayne, R. A. Jenkins, AND E N. Koglin. Environmental Technology Verification Report, Explosives Detection Technology, Research International Inc., Fast 2000. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/045 (NTIS PB2003-106584), 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PUBLISHED REPORT Landscape Indicator Interface With Hydrologic Models Research Plan 05/01/2000
Goodrich, D. C., W G. Kepner, M. Hernandez, S. Miller, B. Goff, K B. Jones, C M. Edmonds, T G. Wade, D W. Ebert, AND D T. Heggem. Landscape Indicator Interface With Hydrologic Models Research Plan. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/042 (NTIS PB2003-106598), 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PUBLISHED REPORT San Pedro Geodata Browser 03/26/2000
Kepner, W G. AND D T. Heggem. San Pedro Geodata Browser. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/C-00/002 (NTIS Rejected), 2000.
Abstract: The San Pedro Data Browser was developed by the Landscape Ecology Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Las Vegas, NV). The goal of the Landscape Sciences Program is to improve decision-making relative to natural and human resource management through the development of an integrated system of landscape change detection metrics and models. The program has proceeded simultaneously along two lines, 1) a research component to develop and test landscape indicators and assessment protocols, and 2) an implementation component to demonstrate the application of landscape analysis protocols to ecological and hydrological assessments via a number of geographic initiatives. Acquisition of primary data and database development are an initial feature of any landscape indicator and assessment project. Since 1995, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientists have been working as part of the multi-agency Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) research consortium dedicated to the study of global change within the Upper San Pedro Watershed.

PUBLISHED REPORT A Research Plan for the Use of Thermal Avhrr Imagery to Study Annual and Seasonal Mean Surface Temperatures for Large Lakes in North America 03/25/2000
Jarnagin, S T. AND E T. Slonecker. A Research Plan for the Use of Thermal Avhrr Imagery to Study Annual and Seasonal Mean Surface Temperatures for Large Lakes in North America. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/012 (NTIS PB2001-101933), 2000.
Abstract: Surface and vertical temperature data will be obtained from several large lakes With surface areas large enough to be effectively sampled with AVHRR imagery. Yearly and seasonal patterns of surface and whole water column thermal values will be compared to estimates of surface temperature obtained from NOM Coast Watch Imagery for , those lakes for the period of time where concurrent imagery and in situ data exist. The 1 . lakes chosen for this study will include lakes with a varying surface area to depth ratios, salinities, and geographic locations. Large shallow lakes are relatively well mixed and are more likely to be isothermal over their depth. Lakes with relatively smaller surface area to depth ratio (very deep lakes) are expected to be highly stratified and heterogeneous in temperature. Salinity and geographic location are also important factors in determining the thermal regime of a lake. Examples of large shallow lakes include Oneida Lake, New York; Lake Okeechobee, Florida; and the Salton Sea, California. Examples of very deep lakes include Pyramid Lake, Nevada and Lake Tahoe, California. The Salton Sea and Pyramid Lake are examples of high salinity systems. The comparison of seasonal values of surface temperature derived remotely from AVHRR imagery with surface and whole water column values will allow for an assessment of the ability of AVHRR imagery to accurately estimate changes in lake thermal values over time.

PUBLISHED REPORT Strategic Plan for Geographic Information System (GIS) Quality Assurance in the EPA 03/07/2000
Brilis, G M. Strategic Plan for Geographic Information System (GIS) Quality Assurance in the EPA. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/009 (NTIS PB2000-106696), 2000.
Abstract: The EPA GIS-QA Team was created to fill the gap between the EPA Quality Assurance (QA) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) communities. All EPA Offices and Regions were invited to participate. Currently, the EPA GIS-QA Team consists of members from the EPA Regional Offices; the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance OECA); the Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances (OPPTS); the Office of Water (OW); the new Office of Environmental Information (OEI); and the Office of Research and Development (ODRD). The GIS-QA Team was established by the Environmental Sciences Division of ORD's National Exposure Research Laboratory.
The EPA GIS-QA Strategic Plan is a product of the EPA GIS-QA Team. It builds upon the framework presented at various conferences during FY99 and was the first attempt to chart a course for the development of the Agency's GIS-QA activities. This Strategic Plan defines the mission of GIS-QA Team throughout EPA, and articulates the strategic vision of the EPA GIS-QA Team. It identifies the short- and long term goals, objectives, and activities necessary to accomplish the mission defined by the strategic vision. As the GIS-QA Team develops, this Strategic Plan will change to adapt to ne technology and changing requirements.

PUBLISHED REPORT A National Assessment of Landscape Change and Impacts to Aquatic Resources: A 10-Year Strategic Plan for the Landscape Sciences Program 02/20/2000
Jones, K B., L R. Williams, A M. Pitchford, E T. Slonecker, J D. Wickham, R. V. O'Neill, D Garofalo, AND W G. Kepner. A National Assessment of Landscape Change and Impacts to Aquatic Resources: A 10-Year Strategic Plan for the Landscape Sciences Program. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/001 (NTIS PB2001-100153), 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

PUBLISHED REPORT Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System(scaps) Lazer-Induced Fluorescence (Lif) Sensor and Support System 02/05/2000
Bujewski, G. AND B. Rutherford. Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System(scaps) Lazer-Induced Fluorescence (Lif) Sensor and Support System. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-97/019, 2000.
Abstract: The Consortium for Site Characterization Technology (CSCT) has established a formal program to accelerate acceptance and application of innovative monitoring and site characterization technologies that improve the way the nation manages its environmental problems. In 1995 the CSCT conducted a demonstration of two in situ laser-induced fluorescence-based technologies using the Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) cone penetrometer testing (CPT) platform. The purpose of this Innovative Technology Verification Report (ITVR) is to document the demonstration activities, present and evaluate the demonstration data in order to verify the performance of the SCAPS LIF sensing technology relative to developer claims. The SCAPS LIF system uses a pulsed laser coupled with an optical detector to measure fluorescence via optical fibers. The LIF method provides data on the in situ distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons based on the fluorescence response induced in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds that are components of petroleum hydrocarbons.
The primary objectives of the field demonstrations were to evaluate the SCAPS LIF technology. In the approved demonstration plan, the developers presented several performance claims against which they were evaluated. The demonstration was designed to evaluate the LIF technology as a field screening method by comparing LIF data to data produced by conventional sampling and analytical methods. The main savings attributable to the SCAPS LIF system is that it can substantially reduce the number of monitoring wells drilled at a site. In a general site characterization effort, it can provide data in less time as far less expensively than a conventional drilling and sampling. Investigation-derived wastes are minimal, and worker exposure to contaminants is reduced when using in situ technologies rather than conventional drilling and sampling methods.

PUBLISHED REPORT Research Plan: Northeastern Nevada Landscape and Aquatic Resource Characterization on Federal Lands 01/30/2000
Hall, R. K., P. Tuttle, P. Husby, D T. Heggem, AND J. Hillenbrand. Research Plan: Northeastern Nevada Landscape and Aquatic Resource Characterization on Federal Lands. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, EPA/600/R-00/011, 2000.
Abstract: There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field.

 

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