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RECORD NUMBER: 15 OF 30

Main Title Ethanol and biofuels agriculture, infrastructure, and market constraints related to expanded production / {electronic resource} :
Author Yacobucci, Brent D.
Publisher Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress,
Place Published {Washington, D.C.} :
Year Published 2007
OCLC Number 123930507
Subject Added Ent Biomass energy--United States; Energy crops--United States; Fuel
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/82500.pdf
Holdings
Library   Call Number Additional Info Location Date Modified
EJBM POD Internet only Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 05/04/2007
Collation 13 p. : digital, PDF file.
Notes "March 16, 2007." Title taken from title screen (viewed May 2, 2007). Includes bibliographical references.
Contents Notes High petroleum and gasoline prices, concerns over global climate change, and the desire to promote domestic rural economies have greatly increased interest in biofuels as an alternative to petroleum in the U.S. transportation sector. Biofuels, most notably corn-based ethanol, have grown significantly in the past few years as a component of U.S. motor fuel supply. Ethanol, the most commonly used biofuel, is blended in nearly half of all U.S. gasoline (t the 10% level or lower in most cases). However, current biofuel supply represents less than 4% of total gasoline demand. While recent proposals have set the goal of significantly expanding biofuel supply in the coming decades, questions remain about the ability of the U.S. biofuel industry to meet rapidly increasing demand. Current U.S. biofuel supply relies almost exclusively on ethanol produced from Midwest corn. In 2006, 17% of the U.S. corn crop was used for ethanol production. To meet some of the higher ethanol production goals would require more corn than the United States currently produces, if all of the envisioned ethanol was made from corn. Due to the concerns with significant expansion in corn-based ethanol supply, interest has grown in expanding the market for biodiesel produced from soybeans and other oil crops. However, a significant increase in U.S. biofuels would likely require a movement away from food and grain crops. Other biofuel feedstock sources, including cellulosic biomass, are promising, but technological barriers make their future uncertain. Issues facing the U.S. biofuels industry include potential agricultural "feedstock" supplies, and the associated market and environmental effects of a major shift in U.S. agricultural production; the energy supply needed to grow feedstocks and process them into fuel; and barriers to expanded infrastructure needed to deliver more and more biofuels to the market. This report outlines some of the current supply issues facing biofuels industries, including the limitations on agricultural feedstocks, infrastructure constraints, energy supply for biofuel production, and fuel price uncertainties.
Access Notes Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Author Added Ent
Schnepf, Randall Dean
Corporate Au Added Ent Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service.
PUB Date Free Form 2007.
Series Title Traced CRS report for Congress ; RL33928.
BIB Level m
OCLC Time Stamp 20070503122549
Cataloging Source OCLC/T
Language eng
Origin OCLC
Type CAT
OCLC Rec Leader 03448nam 2200349Ia 45020