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RECORD NUMBER: 40 OF 1557

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Main Title Air cleaners and indoor air quality. {microform} /
Author Sparks, Leslie E.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1988
Report Number EPA/600/J-88/286
Stock Number PB89-197693
OCLC Number 44725647
Additional Subjects Air pollution control equipment; Air cleaners; Air filters; Performance evaluation; Particles; Electrostatic precipitators; Filtration; Activated carbon; Environmental engineering; Reprints; Air quality; Indoor air pollution
Holdings
Library   Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ERBD PB89-197693 NERL/ESD-LV Library/Las Vegas,NV 08/11/2000
NTIS PB89-197693 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 3 p. ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The paper summarizes material presented at ASHRAE's Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) 1988 meeting in Atlanta, Georgia in April 1988. One conclusion drawn from several papers presented at the meeting, focusing on the role of particulate and gaseous air cleaners in improving IAQ, is that air cleaners have an important role in improving IAQ. However, they must be designed, operated, and maintained properly. There are two main classes of indoor air cleaners: in-duct and room cleaners. In-duct cleaners are installed within heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, and depend on the HVAC fans, ducts, etc. to move dirty air into the air cleaner and cleaned air back into the building. Room air cleaners are self-contained, and designed to handle the air in a single room. Particles in both types of cleaners are collected by fibrous filtration, electrostatic precipitation, or electrostatically augmented filtration. Organic vapors are usually adsorbed by activated carbon filters which can be installed in either type of cleaner. Although many comments in the paper apply to both types of cleaners, it focuses on in-duct units. The rest of the paper discusses factors that affect air cleaner effectiveness, data on particulate and organic cleaners, and measurement techniques.
Notes
"Contract no. CR814169-01." "Journal article." "EPA/600/J-88/286." "Published in ASHRAE Journal, July 1988, p. 45."
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