Research Grants/Fellowships/SBIR

Creation of a Multidisciplinary Project Platform for Water Systems in Developing Countries

EPA Grant Number: SU833943
Title: Creation of a Multidisciplinary Project Platform for Water Systems in Developing Countries
Investigators: Jellison, Kristen L. , Kastango, Nicholas E. , Putnam, Eric D. , Smith, Natalie L. , Weisman, Richard N.
Current Investigators: Jellison, Kristen L. , Canada, Holly , Coull, Tim , Hunter, Kelsey , Kastango, Nick , Kramer, Jason , Moon, Bruce , Putnam, Eric D. , Schweitzer, Andrew , Smith, Natalie L. , Weisman, Richard N.
Institution: Lehigh University
EPA Project Officer: Nolt-Helms, Cynthia
Project Period: August 15, 2008 through August 14, 2009
Project Amount: $9,700
RFA: P3 Awards: A National Student Design Competition for Sustainability Focusing on People, Prosperity and the Planet (2008) RFA Text |  Recipients Lists
Research Category: P3 Challenge Area - Built Environment , P3 Challenge Area - Water , Pollution Prevention/Sustainable Development , P3 Awards , Sustainability

Description:

The Lehigh University chapter of Engineers Without Borders-USA will design and construct a sustainable, multi-phase system for the treatment and distribution of drinking water in Pueblo Nuevo, Honduras. The new system will include a slow sand filter, hypochlorinator, water storage tank, and piping system upgrades. System design and implementation will be approached from a multidisciplinary standpoint, engaging students, faculty, and professionals from a variety of backgrounds to address the technical, social, environmental, and economic concerns associated with water projects in developing countries.

Objective:

The project goals are two-fold: (i) to provide an adequate supply of safe drinking water for the rural village of Pueblo Nuevo, Honduras, and (ii) to develop a multidisciplinary project platform, or holistic framework, which can be adopted by other organizations working on water system improvements in developing countries.

Approach:

System design will fulfill several criteria. The new system will be (i) engineered to provide the quantity and quality of drinking water needed by the community; (ii) culturally appropriate, taking into account end-user lifestyles, water use patterns, preferences (assessed through personal communication and surveys), and local construction techniques; (iii) environmentally sound, using locally-available building materials, and avoiding the use of harsh chemicals or reliance on unsustainable energy sources; and (iv) locally sustainable, involving education programs to transfer system ownership, including all operation and maintenance responsibilities, to the Honduran community. Students, faculty, and professionals from a variety of disciplines, e.g., engineering, political science, environmental science, education, sociology, and economics, will be engaged in the design and implementation process to ensure project sustainability.

Expected Results:

Successful completion of this project will result in (i) an improved drinking water supply for Pueblo Nuevo, Honduras, and (ii) the development of a multidisciplinary project platform to ensure the technical, environmental, social, and economic sustainability of future water supply projects in developing countries.

Publications and Presentations:

Publications have been submitted on this project: View all 8 publications for this project

Supplemental Keywords:

treatment technologies, sustainable infrastructure design, environmental policy, global considerations, holistic design, model for sustainability, international development,

Progress and Final Reports:
Final Report