Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Extramural Research

Grantee Research Project Results

Grantee Research Project Results

Abiotic Fate of Disinfection By-Products in the Drinking Water Distribution System

EPA Grant Number: FP916393
Title: Abiotic Fate of Disinfection By-Products in the Drinking Water Distribution System
Investigators: Pearson, Carrie R.
Institution: University of Minnesota
EPA Project Officer: Zambrana, Jose
Project Period: January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2006
Project Amount: $106,250
RFA: STAR Graduate Fellowships (2004)
Research Category: Academic Fellowships , Engineering and Environmental Chemistry , Fellowship - Environmental Chemistry and Environmental Material Science

Description:

Objective:

The objective of this research is to examine the abiotic degradation pathways and kinetics of selected disinfection by-products (DBPs) in the presence of iron metal and iron corrosion products obtained from drinking water distribution systems.

Approach:

The kinetics and degradation pathways for selected DBPs with iron and iron corrosion products will be determined to facilitate the development of models for predicting the fate of these compounds in distribution systems. Six classes of commonly formed DBPs, including trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloaldehydes, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, and halonitromethanes, will be studied. More specifically, the approach is to: (1) measure the degradation rates of DBPs in the presence of cast iron pipe and its corrosion products; (2) determine the degradation pathways of DBPs in the presence of cast iron pipe and its corrosion products; and (3) assess the effects of iron corrosion mineralogy and water quality (pH, temperature, chlorine residual, and dissolved oxygen concentration) on DBP degradation pathways and kinetics.

DBPs will be degraded in the presence of cast iron pipe and its corrosion products, with degradation rates being related to the Fe(II) content of the minerals. Oxidants, such as chlorine and dissolved oxygen, will compete with the DBPs for reaction sites at the iron surface, thus slowing the DBP degradation rate.

Supplemental Keywords:

fellowship, disinfection by-products, drinking water, trihalomethanes, THMs, haloacetic acids, HAAs, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, halonitromethanes, iron corrosion products, drinking water distribution systems, reduction reactions, degradation kinetics, abiotic degradation, oxidants,, RFA, Scientific Discipline, Water, Chemical Engineering, Environmental Chemistry, Chemistry, Drinking Water, public water systems, degradation, trihalomethanes, disinfection byproducts (DPBs), community water system, treatment, iron, drinking water distribution system, microbial risk management, DBP risk management, drinking water contaminants, abiotic fate, drinking water system

Relevant Websites:

2004 STAR Graduate Fellowship Conference Poster (PDF, 1p., 121KB, about PDF)

Top of Page

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Conclusions drawn by the principal investigators have not been reviewed by the Agency.

Jump to main content.