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Extramural Research

Grantee Research Project Results

NCER Grantee Research Project Results

Accumulation of 4-Nonylphenol (NP) in Short Estuarine Food Chains Potentially Leading to Endocrine Disruption in Chinook Salmon Fry

EPA Grant Number: U915638
Title: Accumulation of 4-Nonylphenol (NP) in Short Estuarine Food Chains Potentially Leading to Endocrine Disruption in Chinook Salmon Fry
Investigators: Hecht, Scott A.
Institution: Oregon State University
EPA Project Officer: Just, Theodore J.
Project Period: August 1, 1999 through August 1, 2002
Project Amount: $95,217
RFA: STAR Graduate Fellowships (1999)
Research Category: Academic Fellowships , Fellowship - Life Sciences , Biology/Life Sciences

Description:

Objective:

The objective of this research project is to investigate the potential for 4-nonylphenol (NP) to move up through estuarine food chains, resulting in endocrine disruption in salmon fry. The overall hypothesis of this research is that transmission of NP will take place through short grazer/consumer food chains in estuarine systems, and this will be sufficient to trigger endocrine disruption in chinook salmon fry.

Approach:

Standard laboratory, sediment, toxicity bioassays were used to investigate bioaccumulation from sediments to amphipods and toxicity to amphipods. Three sets of experiments were conducted to determine these objectives. In the first set, two experiments were run in parallel, one with sediments spiked with 14C-NP and one with sediments spiked with 14C-PCB. Uptake of NP by amphipods was compared to PCB uptake across three treatments, consisting of sediments enriched with organic carbon of different nutritional qualities. In the second set, sensitivity of amphipods and phytoplankton to NP was investigated. The third set of experiments determined if induction of vitellogenin can occur from salmon fry feeding on amphipods that have bioaccumulated NP from contaminated sediments or algae.

Expected Results:

Transmission of NP will take place through short grazer/consumer food chains in estuarine systems sufficient to trigger endocrine disruption in chinook salmon fry.

Supplemental Keywords:

fellowship, sediments, effects, bioavailability, chemicals, environmental chemistry, northwest, Region 10., RFA, Health, Scientific Discipline, Environmental Chemistry, Health Risk Assessment, Endocrine Disruptors - Environmental Exposure & Risk, endocrine disruptors, Biochemistry, Ecological Risk Assessment, Endocrine Disruptors - Human Health, marine food web, aquatic ecosystem, 4-nonylphenol, bioavailability, endocrine disrupting chemicals, exposure studies

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The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Conclusions drawn by the principal investigators have not been reviewed by the Agency.

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