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Extramural Research

2002 Progress Report: Inner City Toxicants and Neurodevelopmental Impairment

EPA Grant Number: R827039
Center: Mount Sinai Center for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research
Center Director: Wolff, Mary S.
Title: Inner City Toxicants and Neurodevelopmental Impairment
Investigators: Wolff, Mary S.
Institution: Mount Sinai School of Medicine
EPA Project Officer: Callan, Richard
Project Period: August 1, 1998 through July 31, 2003 (Extended to July 31, 2004)
Project Period Covered by this Report: August 1, 2001 through July 31, 2002
Project Amount: $3,136,392
RFA: Centers for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research (1998)
Research Category: Children's Health , Health Effects , Human Health

Description:

Objective:

Environmental Toxicants and Neuro-Developmental Impairment in Inner City Children is the unifying scientific theme of the Mount Sinai Center for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research. This Center resides within the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, in the Division of Environmental Health Science.

Children living in poverty in inner-city communities suffer some of the heaviest exposures to environmental toxicants in the United States. The goals of the Mount Sinai Center for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research are (1) to identify linkages between environmental toxicants and neuro-developmental dysfunction in inner-city children; (2) to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms by which environmental toxicants can cause developmental impairment; and (3) to prevent neuro-developmental dysfunction of environmental origin in urban children.

The research and prevention programs of the Center will focus on a range of neurodevelopmental toxicants encountered in the inner city: (1) pesticides-legal insecticides such as chlorpyrifos, and illegal "street" pesticides such as methyl Darathion. tres pasitos and tiza china; (2) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); and (3) lead. Patterns of exposure to these toxicants will be assessed. Adverse developmental outcomes will be examined through epidemiological studies and will include loss of intelligence, delayed attainment of developmental milestones, alteration of behavior and diminished life achievement; potential linkages of these problems to environmental exposures will be studied and etiologic mechanisms elucidated. New aDDroaches to prevention will be evaluated.

The Center includes five interdisciplinary research projects that link epidemiological and basic biological research at the Mount Sinai Medical Center and the New York Academy of Medicine's Center of Urban Epidemiologic Studies with the Boriken Neighborhood Health Center, with the East Harlem Community Health Committee and with an extensive network of community-based organizations in East Harlem.

Progress Summary:

Children in America’s cities are at risk of exposure to multiple known and potential developmental toxicants-- pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and lead. The goal of the Mount Sinai Center for Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention will be to identify, elucidate and prevent developmental deficits that result from exposures to environmental toxicants in the inner city.

Project 1, Barbara Brenner PI, a community-based prevention program, is being undertaken in East Harlem, New York City, in partnership with Boriken Health Center. At Boriken, we are recruiting expectant mothers and implementing an intervention to reduce exposures to pesticides and other developmental toxicants in their homes. Two non-intervention comparison groups consist of expectant mothers in similar housing enrolled in Project 2 and at Settlement Health, a nearby community health center. Environmental assessments are being conducted longitudinally over three years by measuring pesticide ambient levels and roach infestation. To date, 236 expectant mothers have joined the study. Preliminary data show a significant reduction in infestation which we attribute to the detailed individually tailored integrated pest management program that has been developed for each intervention home.

Project 2, Trudy Berkowitz PI, is a prospective epidemiologic study of an ethnically diverse birth cohort of infants born at Mount Sinai. Over 470 mothers have been recruited so far, with 432 births. The ultimate aim is to assess whether in utero exposures to pesticides and other toxicants are associated with developmental delays in children in New York City. Exposures to pesticides are common in this group of mothers. An apparent gene-environment effect has been found for pesticides and infant birth size measures.

Project 3, Jim Wetmur PI, is studying seven genetic polymorphisms in the enzymes that activate and detoxify organophosphates and other pesticides in the population of mothers and infants enrolled in Project 2. Genotypes and phenotypes have been assessed in 656 samples, including maternal and cord bloods. Genotype-phenotype associations of PON1 vary by allele, are independent of race/ethnicity, and are stronger for infants than mothers. Results suggest that infants may be more susceptible to toxic effects of PON1 substrates. High throughput technology has been developed and used in this project.

Project 4, Ezra Susser PI, Tom Matte Co-PI, is a retrospective study of African-American men enrolled in the Collaborative Perinatal Project. A manuscript has been submitted that describes associations between maternal PCB level and neurodevelopmental at age 4, 7, and 17 years. Other analyses are underway. Adult followup has begun to reassess neurologic function.

Project 5, supports Dr. Andrea Gore as a newly recruited Center scientist. She is examining GnRH mechanisms that may control effects of environmental toxicants on neuroendocrine development using GT1-7 neuronal cell lines and a rat model. Consistent results have been found in both systems, such that chemicals may stimulate (Aroclor 1221, chlorpyrifos methoxychlor) or inhibit (Aroclor 1254) GnRH expression in GT1-7 cells. Analogous effects have been found in the rat model for PCBs, while with chlorpyrifos exposure, rats pups exhibit delayed growth.

The Center contains Facilities Cores in Exposure Assessment and Biostatistics/Data Management as well as an Administration Core.


Journal Articles: 25 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other center views: All 32 publications 26 publications in selected types All 25 journal articles

Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Berkowitz GS, Wolff MS, Matte T, Susser E, Landrigan PJ. The rationale for a national prospective cohort study of environmental exposure and childhood development. Environmental Research 2001;85(2):59-68.
abstract available   full text available
R827039 (2002)
R827039C004 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Environmental Research Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: Science Direct PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Berkowitz GS, Obel J, Deych E, Lapinski R, Godbold J, Liu Z, Landrigan PJ, Wolff MS. Exposure to indoor pesticides during pregnancy in a multiethnic, urban cohort. Environmental Health Perspectives 2003;111(1):79-84.
    abstract available   full text available
    R827039 (2002)
    R827039C004 (2002)
    R831711 (2004)
    R831711 (2005)
    R831711 (2006)
    R831711 (2007)
    R831711 (Final)
    R831711C001 (2006)
    R831711C002 (2006)
    R831711C003 (2006)
  • Full-text from PubMed
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Other: EBSCO Host Connection - Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Brenner B. Implementing a community intervention program for health promotion. Social Work in Health Care 2002;35(1-2):359-379.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Other: Informaworld-PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Carpenter DO, Chew FT, Damstra T, Lam LH, Landrigan PJ, Makalinao I, Peralta GL, Suk WA. Environmental threats to the health of children:the Asian perspective. Environmental Health Perspectives 2000;108(10):989-992.
    full text available
    R827039 (2002)
  • Full-text: Environmental Health Perspectives-Full Text
  • Other: Environmental Health Perspectives PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Chen J, Germer S, Higuchi R, Berkowitz G, Godbold J, Wetmur JG. Kinetic polymerase chain reaction on pooled DNA:a high-throughput, high-efficiency alternative in genetic epidemiological studies. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 2002;11(1):131-136.
    abstract available   full text available
    R827039 (2002)
    R827039C001 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: AACR Journals Full Text
    Exit
  • Other: AACR Journals PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Claudio L, Torres T, Sanjurjo E, Sherman L, Landrigan PJ. Environmental health sciences education-a tool for achieving environmental equity and protecting children. Environmental Health Perspectives 1998;106(Supplement 3):849-855.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Associated PubMed link
  • Full-text: Environmental Health Perspectives-Full Text
  • Journal Article Erichsen HC, Engel SAM, Eck PK, Welch R, Yeager M, Levine M, Siega-Riz AM, Olshan AF, Chanock SJ. Genetic variation in the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters, SLC23A1, and SLC23A2 and risk for preterm delivery. American Journal of Epidemiology 2006;163(3):245-254.
    abstract available   full text available
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: American Journal of Epidemiology-Full Text
    Exit
  • Abstract: American Journal of Epidemiology
    Exit
  • Other: American Journal of Epidemiology-PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Flores G, Fuentes-Afflick E, Barbot O, Carter-Pokras O, Claudio L. The health of Latino children: urgent priorities, unanswered questions, and a research agenda. Journal of the American Medical Association 2002;288(1):82-90.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: JAMA-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Forman J, Moline J, Cernichiari E, Sayegh S, Torres J, Landrigan M, Hudson J, Adel H, Landrigan P. A cluster of pediatric metallic mercury cases tracked with meso-2,3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Environmental Health Perspectives 2000;108(6):575-577.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Environmental Health Perspectives-Full Text
  • Other: Environmental Health Perspectives-PDF
  • Journal Article Gore AC. Environmental toxicant effects on neuroendocrine function. Endocrine 2001;14(2):235-246.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
    R827039C002 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Journal Article Gore AC. Organochlorine pesticides directly regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression and biosynthesis in the GT1-7 hypothalamic cell line. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 2002;192(1-2):157-170.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
    R827039C002 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Journal Article Gore AC, Wu TJ, Oung T, Lee JB, Woller MJ. A novel mechanism for endocrine-disrupting effects of polychlorinated biphenyls: direct effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurones. Journal of Neuroendocrinology 2002;14(10):814-823.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
    R827039C002 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Journal Article Landrigan PJ, Suk WA, Amler RW. Chemical wastes, children's health, and the Superfund Basic Research Program. Environmental Health Perspectives 1999;107(6):423-427.
    abstract available   full text available
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Associated PubMed link
  • Other: Environmental Health Perspectives-Access to PDF Download
  • Journal Article Landrigan PJ, Claudio L, Markowitz SB, Berkowitz GS, Brenner BL, Romero H, Wetmur JG, Matte TD, Gore AC, Godbold JH, Wolff MS. Pesticides and inner-city children:exposures, risks, and prevention. Environmental Health Perspectives 1999;107(Supplement 3):431-437.
    abstract available   full text available
    R827039 (2002)
    R827039C002 (2002)
    R827039C003 (2000)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Environmental Health Perspectives Full Text
    Exit
  • Journal Article Landrigan PJ. Pediatric lead poisoning: is there a threshold? (Commentary). Public Health Reports 2000;115(6):530-531. R827039 (2002)
    not available
    Journal Article Landrigan PJ. Children's environmental health. Lessons from the past and prospects for the future. Pediatric Clinics of North America 2001;48(5):1319-1330.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Pediatric Clinics of North America-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Landrigan PJ, Schechter CB, Lipton JM, Fahs MC, Schwartz J. Environmental pollutants and disease in American children:estimates of morbidity, mortality, and costs for lead poisoning, asthma, cancer, and developmental disabilities. Environmental Health Perspectives 2002;110(7):721-728.
    abstract available   full text available
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Environmental Health Perspectives-Full Text
  • Other: Environmental Health Perspectives PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Landrigan PJ. The worldwide problem of lead in petrol. (Editorial). Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2002;80(10):768. R827039 (2002)
  • Full-text: Bulletin of the World Health Organization-Full Text
    Exit
  • Journal Article Landrigan P. Pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs):an analysis of the evidence that they impair children’s neurobehavioral development. Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 2001;73(1):11-17. R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Journal Article Salama J, Chakraborty TR, Ng L, Gore AC. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyls on estrogen receptor-β expression in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus. Environmental Health Perspectives 2003;111(10):1278-1282.
    abstract available   full text available
    R827039 (2002)
    R827039C002 (2002)
    R831711 (2005)
    R831711 (2006)
    R831711 (2007)
    R831711 (Final)
    R831711C001 (2006)
    R831711C002 (2006)
    R831711C003 (2006)
  • Full-text from PubMed
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Associated PubMed link
  • Journal Article Savitz DA, Ananth CV, Berkowitz GS, Lapinski R. Concordance among measures of pregnancy outcome based on fetal size and duration of gestation. American Journal of Epidemiology 2000;151(6):627-633.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Other: American Journal of Epidemiology-PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Susser EB, Brown A, Matte TD. Prenatal factors and adult mental and physical health. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 1999;44(4):326-334.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Canadian Journal of Psychiatry-Full Text
    Exit
  • Journal Article Susser E, Matte TD. Early antecedents of adult health. Journal of Urban Health 1998;75(2):236-241. R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Springer-Link Full Text Preview
    Exit
  • Journal Article Weiss B, Landrigan P. The developing brain and the environment: an introduction. Environmental Health Perspectives 2000;108(Supplement 3):373-374.
    abstract available  
    R827039 (2002)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Environmental Health Perspectives-Full Text
  • Journal Article Wolff MS, Landrigan PJ. Organochlorine chemicals and children’s health (editorial). Journal of Pediatrics 2002;140(1):10-13.
    full text available
    R827039 (2002)
  • Full-text: Journal of Pediatrics-Full Text
    Exit
  • Other: Elsevier PDF
    Exit
  • Supplemental Keywords:

    RFA, Health, Scientific Discipline, Toxics, Epidemiology, pesticides, Risk Assessments, Susceptibility/Sensitive Population/Genetic Susceptibility, Children's Health, genetic susceptability, pesticide exposure, urban air, environmental health, health risks, developmental neurotoxicity, airway disease, environmental risks, lead, PCBs, respiratory problems, developmental lead exposure, children, Human Health Risk Assessment, neurotoxicity, childhood lead exposure, human exposure, susceptibility, children's vulnerablity, assessment of exposure, childhood respiratory disease, neurodevelopmental toxicity, environmentally caused disease, lead exposure, children's environmental health, growth & development, age dependent response, human health risk

    Progress and Final Reports:
    Original Abstract
    2000 Progress Report

    Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R827039C001 Growing Up Healthy in East Harlem
    R827039C002 Exposure to Indoor Pesticides and PCBs and their Effects on Growth and Neurodevelopment in Urban Children
    R827039C003 Genetics of Chlorpyrifos Risk in Minority Populations
    R827039C004 Prenatal PCB Exposure and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Adolescence and Adulthood
    R827039C005 Neuroendocrine Mechanisms of Environmental Toxicants: PCBs and Pesticides

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    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Conclusions drawn by the principal investigators have not been reviewed by the Agency.

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